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How to Say “I’m Sorry” in Russian: 20 Best Apologies

Have you ever tormented yourself about how to apologize and have your apology accepted? It’s hard even in your mother tongue. But when it comes to a foreign language, you need to be even more considerate and attentive. Just learning to say “sorry” in Russian culture isn’t enough; even your gestures and behavior matter when it comes to apologizing, in any language. So, let’s learn how to say “Please, forgive me” in Russian and be on top in any situation. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Russian Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

  1. Body Language for Apology
  2. The Main Words to Say “I am Sorry” in the Russian Language
  3. Formal Apologies
  4. Informal Apologies
  5. Peculiar Apologies
  6. How to Reply to an Apology in Russian
  7. Conclusion

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1. Body Language for Apology

Russian people don’t differ that much from European people when it comes to body language during an apology. So once you’ve found the best way to say “sorry” in Russian for your situation, you can apply the following body language tips to add sincerity and depth to your apology.

If the situation isn’t very formal or serious, you can look into the other person’s eyes. However, this may not be the best approach if you’re late for a job interview.

Looking down during the apology will make it deeper and more sincere.

Child Kneeling


2. The Main Words to Say “I am Sorry” in the Russian Language

3 Ways to Say Sorry

There are two commonly used verbs for an apology in the Russian language: Извинить (Izvinit’) and Простить (Prostit’). Please, note that here these apology verbs are in the infinitive form, and to ask for forgiveness you’ll need to change it according to the situation, whether formal or informal. We’ll learn more about this later on in the article. Both of these words can be used in both kinds of situations. You can choose either one for your apology. The difference is very vague, and not every Russian can define it.

  • Извинить (Izvinit’) comes from the noun Вина (Vina) which means “fault.” By adding the prefix из- (iz-) meaning “out” it’s like asking another person “to take you out of fault.” This word is typically used to apologize for a small fault or in formal situations. People often say it when they don’t feel any fault and apologize just to follow social etiquette. Use this word if you’re not sure if the person is offended or not.
  • Простить (Prostit’) is used when you’ve really offended someone and know that for sure. It means “I understand my fault, I shouldn’t have done that.” This word is used when your conscience is tormenting you and you sincerely want to change that situation.

Let’s try to feel the difference between these two words for the official phrase “Sorry to trouble you.” If you use the verb Извинить (Izvinit’) then the formal phrase will be: Извините за беспокойство (Izvinite za bespokoystvo). You can use it during a call when you formally apologize that you’re distracting another person from his work.

If you use the verb Простить (Prostit’) then the formal phrase will be: Простите за беспокойство (Prostite za bespokoystvo). It sounds more sincere, such as when you really understand that you’ve distracted the person from doing some important job and feel sorry for that.


3. Formal Apologies

Woman Refusing a Handshake

So, as said, Извинить (Izvinit’) and Простить (Prostit’) are the main apology words. This is how they’re transformed for an apology in a formal situation:

  • Извините (Izvinite)—“Excuse me, sorry.”
  • Простите (Prostite)—“Sorry.”
  • You can use these words just like that. But if you add the reason why you’re sorry, it’ll sound more polite and sincere.

    • …, что… (…, chto…) meaning “…, that…” Though it’s enough just so say that you’re sorry, in the Russian language it sounds more polite and sincere if you explain for what you are sorry. For example, “Sorry, I’m late” in Russian is Извините, что опоздал (Izvinite, chto opozdal).
    • … за… (…za…) meaning “…for…” That’s another way to add a reason. For example, Простите за беспокойство (Prostite za bespokoystvo) means “Sorry for troubling you.”

    Also, your apology will sound more polite if you add Пожалуйста (Pozhaluysta) or “Please” to it. For example, Извините, пожалуйста, что отвлекаю, но вас вызывает начальник (Izvinite, pozhaluysta, chto otvlekayu, no vas vyzyvayet nachal’nik) means “I’m sorry to interrupt, but the boss is calling for you.”

  • Прошу прощения (Proshu proshcheniya)—“I apologize”. This apology is very official and can be used in a public speech. Note that if you’re apologizing on behalf of a whole company, use Просим прощения (Prosim proshcheniya) meaning “We apologize.” Don’t forget to add …, что… (…, chto…) meaning “…, for…”. For example, Прошу прощения, что отвлекаю (Proshu proshcheniya, chto otvlekayu) means “Sorry for distracting you.”
    • Я бы хотел попросить прощения за… (Ya by khotel poprosit’ proshcheniya za…)—“I want to apologize for” (for a male). This is another apology phrase with the same meaning.
    • Я бы хотела попросить прощения за… (Ya by khotela poprosit’ proshcheniya za…)—“I want to apologize for” (for a female).
  • Я извиняюсь, что (Ya izvinyayus’, chto…)—“I apologize for…” This is another form of the formal apology. It’s usually used when you don’t expect an answer or reply to your apology and apologize just to keep social etiquette. For example, Я извиняюсь, что так получилось (Ya izvinyayus’, chto tak poluchilos’) meaning “I am sorry that it happened that way.” If you want to make a deep apology and say “I’m very sorry” in Russian, use the phrase Я сильно извиняюсь, что (Ya sil’no izvinyayus’, chto…).
    • Я бы хотел извиниться за… (Ya by khotel izvinit’sya za…)—“I want to apologize for” (for a male). Another form of the same apology. It’s a bit longer, so it feels more profound.
    • Я бы хотела извиниться за… (Ya by khotela izvinit’sya za…)—“I want to apologize for” (for a female).
  • Приносим свои извинения (Prinosim svoi izvineniya)—“We apologize.” The phrase is usually used for an official announcement from a company. The phrase Приносим свои извинения за доставленные неудобства (Prinosim svoi izvineniya za dostavlennyye neudobstva), meaning “We apologize for any inconvenience,” is often used for official announcements. For example, if one of the metro lines or metro stations is closed for reconstruction, the company in charge may make a similar announcement.
  • Мне очень жаль (Mne ochen’ zhal’)—“I feel so sorry.” This phrase emphasizes the regrets that you have about something. Note that it may be not only an apology, but also a way of showing compassion about some negative event. If you’re wondering how to say “I’m sorry for your loss,” or “I’m sorry to hear that,” in Russian, this is a good place to start. For example:
    • Мне очень жаль, что так получилось (Mne ochen’ zhal’, chto tak poluchilos’)—“I feel so sorry that it happened that way.”
    • Мне очень жаль, что так вышло (Mne ochen’ zhal’, chto tak vyshlo)—“I feel so sorry that it happened that way.”


4. Informal Apologies

Woman Apologizing

This is how the main apology words Извинить (Izvinit’) and Простить (Prostit’) look like in an informal situation:

  • Извини (Izvini)—“Sorry”
  • Прости (Prosti)—“Sorry”

So, “Sorry, comrade” in Russian translates to Прости, друг (Prosti, drug).

You can also add Пожалуйста (Pozhaluysta) meaning “Please,” or the reason, or even address the person. For example:

  • Прости, пожалуйста, что не позвонил раньше (Prosti, pozhaluysta, chto ne pozvonil ran’she)—“I’m sorry that I didn’t call earlier.”
  • Извини, что звоню так поздно (Izvini, chto zvonyu tak pozdno)—“I’m sorry that I’m calling so late at night.”

There’s an interesting informal apology when you refer to yourself in the third person. Though it’s rarely used nowadays, you can find it a lot in books, films, and series:

  • Прости дурака (Prosti duraka)—“Forgive me for being such a fool.”
  • Прости идиота (Prosti idiota)—“Forgive me for being such an idiot.”

You can add some phrases after the main apology to make it stronger:

  • Я не хотел тебя обидеть (Ya ne khotel tebya obidet’)—“I didn’t want to offend you.” For a male.
  • Я не хотела тебя обидеть (Ya ne khotela tebya obidet’)—“I didn’t want to offend you.” For a female.
  • Я больше так не буду (Ya bol’she tak ne budu)—“I won’t do it again.”


5. Peculiar Apologies

Say Sorry

Of course, some people get bored with the more popular apologies and find ways to sound more original when apologizing. Most of these should be used in informal situations:

  • Тысяча извинений (Tysyacha izvineniy)—“Thousands of my apologies to you.” This apology is used a lot in old books and stories. It gives a slight feeling of the time of knights and kings.
  • Пардон (Pardon)—“Pardon.” This apology comes from French and is often used in Russia. However, use it carefully as it gives off a feeling of insincerity. Also, a lot of Russian guys use it when they’re drunk. You can also use Пардоньте (Pardon’te) meaning “Pardon” when you ask someone for an apology in a casual way.
  • Виноват (Vinovat)—“I’m guilty.” This apology comes from the military world.
    • Виноват, исправлюсь (Vinovat, ispravlyus’)—“I’m guilty, I will not do that again.” This is another military apology. You show that you understand that you did something wrong and that you’re ready to make amends or behave better.
    • Виноват, каюсь (Vinovat, kayus’)—“I’m guilty, I confess that.” This apology is a bit on the religious side. You emphasize that you confess the sin you’ve committed. This apology is also used only in books now, or you can sometimes hear it used in casual situations.
  • Ну, извиняйте (Nu, izvinyayte)—“Sorry.” This is a very informal apology in front of friends. You accept that you did something wrong, but you arrogantly show that you’re higher than that.
  • Сорри (Sorri)—“Sorry.” This informal apology comes from English.
    • Сорян (Soryan)—“Sorry.” This one is even more informal than the previous one. It’s used among millennials.
    • Сорян, чё (Soryan, cho)—“Sorry.” This is another version of the previous one. By adding чё (cho) which is the informal abbreviation of что (chto) meaning “what,” it’s sort of like asking “So, what? So what can you do about that?”
  • Я сожалею, что… (Ya sozhaleyu, chto…)—“I feel sorry for…”. This is a formal but outdated apology. You’ll find it a lot in books, but rarely in real life. For example, Я сожалею, что заставил вас ждать (Ya sozhaleyu, chto zastavil vas zhdat’)—“I feel sorry for keeping you waiting.”


6. How to Reply to an Apology in Russian

1- General Answers

People Shaking Hands

  • Ничего страшного (Nichego strashnogo)—“Nothing bad happened.” This is a frequently used answer both in formal and informal situations. For example, if you’re late for a job interview and apologize, you’ll probably get this phrase as a reply.
  • Всё в порядке (Vsyo v poryadke)—“Everything is okay.” This is another answer to an apology in formal and informal situations. You can even combine both phrases: Ничего страшного, всё в порядке (Nichego strashnogo, vsyo v poryadke) meaning “Nothing bad happened, everything is okay,” to emphasize that the apology was accepted.

2- Informal Answers

Child Leaning on a Shoulder

  • Проехали (Proyekhali)—“Already forgotten.” The word Проехать (Proyekhat’) means to pass by on a car or some other vehicle. So, this answer means that you passed that uncomfortable situation quickly and it’s not worth even noticing.
  • Бывает (Byvayet)—“It happens.” You express to the person apologizing that it’s not that much of a fault. By using this phrase, you even support the person a little bit, so he won’t worry too much about what happened.
  • Ладно, забыли (Ladno, zabyli)—“It’s okay, let’s forget about it.” By using this phrase, you show that you’re not interested in listening to any further apologies. Be careful when using this phrase. It can mean that you still feel angry about what the other person did, but want to stop the conflict and swallow your grudge.
  • Ничего (Nichego)—“It’s nothing.” This is a really light and frequently used reply to an apology. It’s a short version of Ничего страшного (Nichego strashnogo) which means “Nothing bad happened.”
  • Ничего-ничего (Nichego-nichego)—“It’s okay.” This is another version of Ничего (Nichego) meaning “It’s nothing.” Use it when you want to quickly switch the topic to other things.


7. Conclusion

As you can see, there are a lot of ways to say “I apologize” in Russian, but 90% of all apologies include either the word Извинить (Izvinit’) or the word Простить (Prostit’). Make sure to remember how these infinitives change in formal and informal apologies. For formal ones, use Извините (Izvinite)—“Sorry” and Простите (Prostite)—“Sorry.” For informal ones, use Извини (Izvini)—“Sorry” and Прости (Prosti)—“Sorry.” Once you feel comfortable using these common Russian “Sorry” words, choose some other apologies and learn them to expand your vocabulary and impress your Russian partners and friends.

The wide range of Russian apologies can be confusing at first, especially if you’ve just started to learn the language. Consider taking some lessons in our MyTeacher program for Russian-learners to get a great head start and save time by minimizing study efforts. With the help of our teachers, you’ll improve your Russian language skills in no time and start to sound like a real Russian very soon.

Увидимся! (Uvidimsya!)—“See you!”

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How to Say I Love You in Russian - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Russian could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Russian partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At RussianPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Russian lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Russian dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Russian Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Russian Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Russian Faster?

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1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Russian love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Russian word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Russian date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Russian Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • Не хочешь сходить со мной куда-нибудь поужинать?
  • Ne khochesh skhadit’ sa mnoy kuda-nibut’ pauzhinat’?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Russian is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • Ты свободна в эти выходные?
  • Ty svabodna v eti vykhadnyye?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • Сходим куда-нибудь?
  • Skhodim kuda-nibut’?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • Во сколько встретимся завтра?
  • Va skol’ka fstretimsya zavtra?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • Где встретимся?
  • Gde fstretimsya?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • Отлично выглядишь.
  • Atlichna vyglyadish.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • Ты такой милый.
  • Ty takoy milyy.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • Как тебе это место?
  • Kak tebe eta mesta?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Russian language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • Мы можем увидеться снова?
  • My mozhem uvidetsa snova?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • Пойдём куда-нибудь еще?
  • Paydyom kuda-nibut’ eshcho?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • Я знаю хорошее место.
  • Ya znayu kharosheye mesta.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • Я отвезу тебя домой.
  • Ya atvezu tebya damoy.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • Это был чудесный вечер.
  • Eta byl chudesnyy vecher.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • Когда мы увидимся снова?
  • Kagda my uvidimsya snova?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • Я тебе позвоню.
  • Ya tebe pazvanyu.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Russian phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Russian below!

Date Ideas in Russian

museum

  • музей
  • muzey

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • ужин при свечах
  • uzhin pri svechakh

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • сходить в зоопарк
  • skhadit’ v zaapark

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • устроить долгую прогулку
  • ustroit’ dolguyu pragulku

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • сходить в оперу
  • skhadit’ v operu

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • сходить в океанариум
  • skhadit’ v akeanarium

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • гулять по пляжу
  • gulyat’ pa plyazhu

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • устроить пикник
  • ustroit’ piknik

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • готовить еду вместе
  • gatovit’ edu vmeste

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • поужинать и посмотреть фильм
  • pauzhinat’ i pasmatret’ fil’m

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Russian

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Russian - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Russian Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Russian yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Russian? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Russian love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Russian

You mean so much to me.

  • Ты так много значишь для меня.
  • Ty tak mnoga znachish` dlya menya

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • Будешь ли ты моим Валентином?
  • Budesh` li ty maim Valentinom?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • Ты такая красивая.
  • Ty takaya krasivaya.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Russian, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • Ты для меня больше чем друг
  • Ty dlya menya bol`she chem drug

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Russian dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • Даже 100 сердец будет слишком мало чтобы выразить всю мою любовь к тебя.
  • Dazhe 100 serdets budet slishkam malo chtoby vyrazit` vsyu mayu lyubov` k tebe.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • Любовь, это просто любовь. Её никогда нельзя объяснить.
  • Lyubov’, eto prosto lyubov’. Yeyo nikagda nel`zya ob`yasnit`

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • Ты так красив.
  • Ty tak krasiv.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Russian love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • Ты мне нравишься.
  • Ty mne nravish`say.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • Ты заставляешь меня быть лучшим мужчиной.
  • ty zastavlyaesh` menya byt` luchshim muzhchinai.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Russian girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • Пусть всё что ты делаешь, будет сделано в любви.
  • Pust` vsyo chto ty delaesh`, budet sdelana v lyubvi.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • Ты моё солнце, моя любовь.
  • Ty mayo solntse, maya lubov`.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • Слова не могут описать мою любовь к тебе.
  • Slava ne mogut apisat’ mayu lyubov’ k tebe.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • Мы встретились чтобы быть вместе.
  • My vstretilis` chtoby byt` vmeste.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • Если вы думаете о ком-то, читая это, Вы определённо влюблены.
  • Yesli vy dumaete a kom-to chitaya eta, vy apredelyona vlyubleny.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

I love you.

  • Я люблю тебя.
  • Ya lyublyu tebya.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Russian carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

5. Russian Quotes about Love

Russian Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Russian lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Russian that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Russian Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Russian lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Russian custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Russian Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Нам нужно поговорить.
    • Nam nuzhna pagavarit’.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Дело не в тебе, а во мне
    • Delo ne v tebe, a va mne

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Russian lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Я просто не готов к такого рода отношениям.
    • Ya prosta ne gatov k takova roda atnasheniyam.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Давай останемся друзьями
    • Davay astanemsya druz`yami

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Russian, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Я думаю, нам стоит сделать перерыв.
    • Ya dumayu, nam stoit sdelat’ pereryv.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Ты заслуживаешь лучшего.
    • Ty zasluzhivayesh’ luchshego.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Мы должны начать встречаться с другими людьми.
    • My dolzhny nachat’ vstrechatsyas s drugimi lyud`mi.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Мне нужно больше свободы.
    • Mne nuzhno bol`she svabody

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Я думаю, что мы слишком спешим.
    • Ya dumayu, chto my slishkam speshim

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Мне нужно сосредоточиться на своей карьере.
    • Mne nuzhno sasredatochit’sya na svoyey kar’yere.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Я не достаточно хорош для тебя.
    • Ya ne dastatachno khorosh dlya tebya.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Я больше не люблю тебя.
    • Ya bol`she ne lyublyu tebya.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Мы просто не подходим друг другу.
    • My prosta ne padkhodim drug drugu.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Так будет лучше
    • Tak budet luch`she

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Мы отдалились друг от друга.
    • My atdalilis’ drug ot druga.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Russian faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. RussianPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Russian language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Russian Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Russian speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    RussianPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Russian, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Russian even faster.

    2- Having your Russian romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Russian language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Russian lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Russian partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why RussianPod101 helps you learn Russian Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Russian

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Russian is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at RussianPod101 is translated into both English and Russian. So, while your partner can help you learn Russian faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Russian Culture
    At RussianPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Russia. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Russian partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Russian Phrases
    You now have access to RussianPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Russian soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    How to Say Hello in Russian: 30 Unique Greetings

    How to Say Hello in Russian

    Have you ever thought about how the choice of words when greeting sets the mood for the whole conversation? Hello. Howdy. What’s up. Yo. Aloha. Salute. Do you feel the difference between how these words affect the situations they’re used in? The same concept is true for the Russian language. There are a lot of different greeting words in there and you should try to understand and imagine every situation in which they could be used. That said, here are some Russian greetings for beginners.

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    1. Russian Greetings for Beginners

    There are two basic ways to say “Hello” in Russian.

    • Здравствуйте (zdravstvuyte) — This is a formal Russian greeting for “Hello.” If you ask a local: “How do you say ‘Hello’ in Russian?” he’ll teach you this word. Use it when you meet elder people, people you have a great respect for, and people you have the intention to become buddies with.
      • Another version of this Russian greeting is Здравствуй (zdravstvuy)—“Hello.” Don’t confuse it with the previous one. This is a much less formal greeting and is usually addressed to younger people or people of the same age, who are not close friends. For example, a teacher could use it to greet a new student in the class.
    • Привет (privet)—“Hi” in Russian. If you ask a local: “How do you say ‘Hi’ in Russian?” he’ll most definitely tell you this greeting. This is the most common Russian informal greeting. It’s great to use in every informal situation.

    2. Formal Hello in Russian

    • Доброе утро (dobroe utro)—this is essentially how to say “Good morning” in Russian. If you ask a local: “How do you say ‘Good morning’ in Russian?” without a doubt, he’ll tell you this translation. It could be used both in formal and informal situations—just as it can be in English. Доброе (dobroe) means “Kind,” so this is sort of like wishing a person to have “a kind morning.” But the meaning is still similar to the English greeting.
    • Добрый день (dobryy den`)—“Good day” or “Good afternoon” in Russian translation. This greeting is used mostly in formal situations.
    • Добрый вечер (dobryy vecher)—“Good evening” in Russian. This greeting is also used mostly in formal situations.
    • Shake Hands

    • Приветствую (privetstvuyu)—“Hello” in Russian. This is between formal and informal when it comes to Russian greetings. Men could address friends with this greeting in order to appear more “manly.” Feel free to use this during friendly gatherings when you take a word and address everyone. For example, “Hello comrade” in Russian is Приветствую вас, товарищи! (Privetstvuyu vas, tovarishchi!).
    • Добро пожаловать! (Dobro pozhalovat`!)—“Welcome” in Russian. This is rarely used in everyday life. But it’s often used on TV shows or official events to greet guests. So, if you’re wondering “How do you say ‘Welcome to Russia’ in Russian?” then the answer is Добро пожаловать в Россию! (Dobro pozhalovat` v Rossiyu!).
    • Алло (allo)—is the Russian word for “Hello” when answering the phone in Russian in both formal and informal situations. However, if you want to be even more official and respectful—e.g. to a higher-ranked person—use Да, здравствуйте (Da, zdravstvuyte) which means “Yes, hello.”
      • Алё (alyo)—“Hello.” This is another way to say Алло (allo) when you answer the phone in Russian, if you’re going for a less formal approach. A lot of people use both of them.
      • Але (ale)—“Hello.” This is also an option to answer a phone call. It’s used mostly by young people who want to look original.
    • Доброго времени суток (dobrogo vremeni sutok)—“Good time of the day.” This phrase is popular in correspondence situations where the sender doesn’t know when the receiver opens the email and reads it. But be careful, as some people hate this greeting because it feels too original and appears to be just temporal fashion.

    Russian Greetings

    3. Informal “Hi” in Russian

    • Приветик (privetik); приветики (privetiki)—“Hello” in Russian informal language. These greetings are formed from the basic Привет (privet)—“Hi” and are used by girls when trying to be cute. Guys rarely use them, but when they do they mean to flirt.
    • Здорово (zdorovo); здарова (zdarova); здаров (zdarov); здоров (zdorov); даров (darov)—“Hi.” This popular and cool way to greet in Russian is usually used by millennials. You need to already be good friends with the person to say it.
    • Дратути (dratuti)—“Hi.” This is an original greeting that comes from Internet memes and chats. This is usually used by computer geeks.

    1- Phrasal Informal Greetings

    • О, какие люди! (O, kakie lyudi!)—“Oh, that’s you!” This phrase is how Russians greet when they unexpectedly meet one or several friends/family members.
    • Сколько лет, сколько зим! (Skol`ko let, skol`ko zim)—“Long time, no see.” Literally, it means “How many winters, how many summers (we haven’t seen each other)” and is used when you haven’t seen a person for a really long time.
    • Здравия желаю! (Zdraviya zhelayu!)—“Hello” in Russian formal military style.
    • С приездом! (S priezdom!)—“Welcome!” It’s used when the person just arrived somewhere.
      • С прилётом! (S prilyotom!)—“Welcome!” This one is used when the person just arrived somewhere by plane.

    2- Greetings from Other Languages

    • Аллоха (Allokha)—“Aloha.” This is the original way to greet used by modern millennials and young bloggers.
    • Салют (Salyut)—“Salute.” This is another original way to say “Hi.”
    • Хэллоу (Khellou)—“Hello.” It’s usually used by people who know English and try to look modern and original. There are a lot of other greetings that were taken from the English language and mean the same:
      • Хай (Khay)—“Hi” in Russian.
      • Хей (Khey)—“Hey” in Russian. So, if you’re wondering how to say “Hey” in Russian, the answer is easy—Хей (Khey).
      • Хэлло (Khello)—“Hello” in Russian.
      • Хаюшки (Khayushki)—cute form of “Hi” in Russian.
      • Йоу (You) —“Yo” in Russian.

    3- Russian Greeting Slang Words and Interesting Greetings for Advanced Learners

    Greeting

    • Моё почтение (Moyo pochtenie); наше почтение (nashe pochtenie)—“Hello.” This is an old way to say “hello” among high society members. It can be used today to bring in the atmosphere from that time.
    • Здрасти-мордасти (Zdrasti-mordasti)—“Hi.” It’s usually used by very old people, and is considered an outdated Russian greeting.
    • Мир вам (Mir vam)—“Let the peace be with you.” This greeting is basically used by churchmen and religious people, and also comes from the old times.
    • Наше вам почтение (Nashe vam pochtenie)—“We express our respect to you.” This is yet another Russian greeting that comes from old times. Nowadays, it may be used by old people.
    • Ку! (Ku!)—“Hi” from the film “Кин-дза-дза!” (kin-dza-dza). This is usually used by people who have watched this film.
    • Физкульт-привет! (Fizkul`t-privet!)—“Hi” from the film “Джентльмены удачи” (Dzhentl`meny udachi). This is how Russians greet people who are training. As the film is a Soviet one, this greeting is used mostly by older people.

    4. Following Questions

    Wanna know how to say “How are you?” in Russian? All these questions may follow the informal greeting, and most of them—except one—have this meaning.

    • Как дела? (Kak dela?)—“How are you doing?” in Russian. This is the most common question to start a conversation. This is used by everyone.
      • Как ты? (Kak ty?)—“How are you?” This one is another, more personal way to ask Как дела? (Kak dela?).
      • Как оно? (Kak ono?)—“How is it? How are you doing?” This Russian greeting is very popular nowadays, especially among millennials.
    • Как жизнь? (Kak zhizn`?)—“How is your life?” Essentially, this means the same as Как дела? (Kak dela?) but is used less often by older people.
      • Как жизнь молодая? (Kak zhizn` molodaya?)—“How is your young life going?” This is used by older people to the younger generation when they haven’t seen each other for a long time.
    • Рад тебя видеть (Rad tebya videt`)—“Glad to see you.” This is one of the more popular Russian greetings between friends, and is typically used to address good friends.
    • Как поживаешь? (Kak pozhivayesh’?)—“How are you doing?” This is usually used by older people and mostly in letters and emails.
    • Что нового? (Shto novogo?)—“What’s new?” This means the same as Как дела? (Kak dela?) but is less general. Ask it if you want to know what new things happened with the person during the time you were apart.
      • Что новенького? (Shto noven`kogo?)—“What’s new?” This is a cuter way of saying Что нового? (Chto novogo?).
      • Какие новости? (Kakie novosti?)—“What is the news?” This means the same as Как дела? (Kak dela?) but is used to greet more distant friends.
    • Чем занимаешься? (Chem zanimaesh’sya?)—“What are you doing?” in Russian. For the same meaning, you can also use Что делаешь? (Chto delayesh’?).

    So, if you wanna say: “Hello. How are you?” in Russian, you can say: Привет. Как ты? (Privet. Kak ty?).

    5. Fun Exercise: Check Yourself and Choose the Right Greeting

    Greeting

    Read a dialogue between two people and choose a greeting that fits.

    1. Лена: _______ Что делаешь вечером? Го гулять. (Lena: ______ Chto delaesh’ vecherom? Go gulyat’.)
    Антон: Сорян, занят. Давай завтра? (Anton: Soryan, zanyat. Davay zavtra?)
    Лена: Ок. Спишемся тогда. (Lena: Ok. spishemsya togda.)

    Choose the right answer:
    1. Физкульт-привет!
    2. С приездом!
    3. Здаров.
    4. Здравствуйте.

    Lena: “_______ Any plans for the evening? Let’s have a walk.”
    Anton: “Sorry, busy. Tomorrow?”
    Lena: “Sure. Let’s get in touch later then.”

    2. Вадим: Здравствуйте. К сожалению, не успеваю выслать дизайн сайта на просмотр сегодня. Если вышлю завтра утром - будет нормально? (Vadim: Zdravstvuyte. K sozhaleniyu, ne uspevayu vyslat` dizayn sayta segodnya. Yesli vyshlyu zavtra utrom - budet normal`no?)
    Толя: ________. Да, хорошо. Буду ждать (Tolya: ________. Da, khorosho. Budu zhdat`.)
    Вадим: Благодарю. (Vadim: Blagodaryu.)

    Choose the right answer:
    1. Мир вам.
    2. Добрый день.
    3. Приветики.
    4. Дратути.

    Vadim: “Hello. Unfortunately, I can’t send you the website design today. Will tomorrow morning be okay?”
    Tolya: “________. Sure. Will be waiting for it.”
    Vadim: “Thank you.”

    6. Conclusion

    So, now you can say “Hi. How are you?” in Russian in many different ways and are able to choose a proper greeting according to the situation. Don’t hesitate to use some of the uncommon greetings that we described above while you’re learning. But in any important situation, just stick to the most regular ones—Привет (Privet) and Здравствуйте (Zdravstvuyte).

    Official “Hello” in Russian English spelling could be tricky, as the Russian letter в (v) is quiet, so check Здравствуйте (Zdravstvuyte) several times before sending it to your Russian partner or colleague.

    Keep reading RussianPod101 and learn interesting Russian words and expressions that you can start using right away. For example, learn how to say “Good night” in Russian or how to say “Goodbye” in Russian translation in our next articles!

    For now, keep practicing these Russian greetings and introductions so that you can be a pro in no time! We hope this Russian greeting guide has helped you to learn all about Russian greetings. Best of luck with your continued learning!

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    My 5 Tips for Getting the Most Out of RussianPod101

    My 5 Tips for Getting the Most Out of RussianPod101

    We are so lucky. Think about it: if you wanted to learn Russian (or any other skill) even 25 years ago, you would’ve needed to go to the library, take expensive classes and hunt down the right information. Instead of spending your time practicing, you would be busy doing other things. Now, with a quick Google search you can find literally anything you need for learning Russian on the internet:

    • Forgot the genitive plural of female nouns? Wikipedia has a detailed page explaining those.
    • Want to watch Russian movies with subtitles? Check out Youtube (Mosfilm in particular).
    • Or like to put your Russian to the test with a one-on-one lesson with a native Russian speaker? Tons of online platforms where you can have Skype lessons.

    So it’s no longer a lack of materials or resources that holds you back. But rather finding the time and motivation to put them into practice.

    If you’re already listening to the podcasts of RussianPod101, and find that you’re lacking this time or motivation – then here are some of my tips and tricks that I’ve used over the last couple of years to get the most out RussianPod101:

    Podcast

    1. Aim for 1 podcast every day

    It’s easy to set the bar high and want to put 2 hours of Russian practice in every day. But for most of us that’s not realistic. Do you want to sit behind your desk to practice Russian – even after a long day at work? Probably not.

    But if you take it easy, and do a small thing consistently, you’ll find that you’ll make progress almost without noticing it.

    Listen to 1 podcast every day. They’re only 10-15 minutes and everyone can make time for that. Even on your worst day, you’ve got 15 minutes, right? Listening to 1 podcast per day will ensure that your brain gets the time off to digest everything you’ve learned. And that you can come back the next day fresh and ready for a new lesson.

    Tip: get some sort of habit tracker app on your phone and every day that you listen to a Russian podcast, add a checkmark.

    Lesson Review Tool

    2. Use the lesson review tools

    If you want to go the extra mile after listening to the podcast, then use the lesson review tools. A quick review of what you’ve learned will ‘cement’ the information in your brain. And it will make it 10X more effective. Repetition is key when learning Russian – so the more you see/practice a specific word or phrase, the better you’ll remember it.

    Tip: make sure to get 8 hours of sleep every night. Sleep is crucial for memory retention and learning new things.

    3. Take the 2000 most common words and put them in a spaced repetition app

    It’s said that around 600 words make up 80% of all the words in major newspapers. So why not apply this principle in your Russian studies? Take it a step further: if you learn the 2000 most common words, I’m sure you’ll have no problem getting around in Russia.

    The list from RussianPod101 is a great tool for this. It has example phrases with the word and you can listen to the correct pronunciation (which is perfect, because of the random nature of stresses in Russian words).

    It works even better when you get a spaced repetition program and create your own flashcard deck. This is especially effective if you have it on your phone. So you can practice a couple of words whenever you’re standing in line at the grocery store, waiting for someone or when travelling.

    Tip: use the built-in flashcards from RussianPod101. Or download the free app Anki on your phone and manually enter every word that you find difficult.

    Dead Time

    4. Make use of ‘dead’ time

    How much time do you spend every week doing the following tasks:

    • Commuting to work/school
    • Doing groceries
    • Walking
    • Cleaning

    It’s probably more than a couple of hours, right? Don’t waste this time. Use it instead to listen to Russian podcasts. You’ll free up time for other activities. And you’ll get better at Russian without specifically scheduling time to practice.

    This is one of the ‘secrets’ that separates successful Russian learners from others. They take every opportunity they can get to practice.

    You can download all the RussianPod101 lessons to your phone. Each season of podcasts will be stored as an album, so it’s easy to put on your headphones and listen to a quick lesson whenever you’ve got the time.

    Tip: delete every lesson directly after you’ve listened to it. That way you won’t have to keep track of which lesson you’re at.

    5. Have the right expectations

    On the internet you’ll find all sorts of wacky language learning systems and secret tricks that promise fluency in several months (or even weeks). While they often have some merit, most of the time the claims are not based on reality.

    The problem is when you measure your own progress to these standards. It can be very demotivating if you’ve been promised that you could learn Russian in 3 months - and you’re only having basic conversations at that time (which is actually very good).

    I’ve been seriously studying Russian for around 2.5 years now, and I’ve only recently got to the point where I can talk about a wide variety of topics in Russian. I don’t consider myself fluent, but I’m at the point where I can freely speak with native Russian speakers and understand movies without subtitles.

    That’s not to say that it will take you that long. Fluency isn’t an on/off switch. With daily practice you can already have basic conversations after several weeks of practice. You’ll get better every day and it’s this exact sense of progress that will motivate you.

    Just don’t expect to speak like a native and read Dostoyevsky after 6 months.

    Tip: talk to other people that are learning Russian (who are further than you) and ask them how long they’ve been practicing. You’ll get a good sense of how long it takes to get to a specific level.

    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Russian

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Russian!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Russian Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can RussianPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Russian - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Russian? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Russian words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. funny - смешной - smeshnoy
    2. joke - шутить - shutit’
    3. prank - шалость - shalast’
    4. lie - лгать - lgat`
    5. humor - юмор - yumar
    6. fool - дурак - durak
    7. deceptive - обманчивый - abmanchivyy
    8. surprise - удивлять - udivlyat`
    9. sneaky - подлый - podlyy
    10. prankster - проказник - prakaznik
    11. April 1st - Первое апреля - Pervaye aprelya
    12. play a joke - разыгрывать - razygryvat’

    2. Russian Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Russian Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Russian to prank your favorite Russian friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Russian in 1 month.
      • Я выучил русский язык за 1 месяц.
      • Ya vyuchil russiy yazyk za odin mesyats.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Все занятия сегодня были отменены.
      • Vse zanyatiya sevodnya byli atmeneny.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Мне очень жаль, но я сломал Ваши любимые очки.
      • Mne ochen’ zhal’, no ya slamal vashi lyubimye ochki.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • Кто-то только что врезался в твою машину.
      • Kto-to tol`ko shto vrezalsya v tvoyu mashinu
    5. I’m getting married.
      • Я выхожу замуж
      • Ya vykhazhu zamuzh
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • Вы выиграли бесплатный билет.
      • Vy vyigrali besplatnyy bilet.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • Я видел как буксировали ваш автомобиль.
      • Ya videl kak buksiravali vash avtamabil`.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Они раздают бесплатные подарочные карты перед зданием.
      • Oni razdayut besplatnye padarachnyye karty pered zdaniyem.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • Красивый парень ждет тебя на улице.
      • Krasivyy paren’ zhdet tebya na ulitse.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • Красивая девушка попросила меня передать этот телефонный номер вам.
      • Krasivaya devushka paprasila menya peredat` etot telefonnyy nomer vam.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • Можешь спуститься вниз? У меня есть что-то особенное для тебя.
      • Mozhesh spustit’sya vniz? U menya yest’ chto-to osobennoye dlya tebya.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Спасибо за любовное письмо этим утром. Я и не догадывалась о твоих чувствах.
      • Spasibo za lyubovnoye pis`mo etim utrom. Ya i ne dogadivalas` o tvoih chuvstavah.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Russian, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can RussianPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Russia, or if you work for any Russian company, knowing the above Russian prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Russian words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Russian - bone up your Russian language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, RussianPod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Russian below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at RussianPod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Russian - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

    Thank you for helping RussianPod101! We’re serious about making learning Russian fun.

    4 Reasons Why Russian Slang Words Will Make You Fluent

    Learn 4 honest reasons you need Russian slang words and why they are so vital to truly learning and mastering the language.

    Teachers may normally cringe at the thought of their students learning Russian slang words. After all, slang words and phrases are typically defined as being grammatically incorrect. So why would your teacher want you to spend time learning the “wrong way” to speak Russian? Here are 4 of the top reasons why you should study slang words and expressions when learning Russian or any new language.

    reasons to learn russian slang words

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole Russian Language from the Beginning!

    1. Native Speakers Use Slang Expressions in Everyday Conversation

    If you are going to study a foreign language and plan to use it to speak with native speakers, then you have to learn slang words and expressions. Otherwise, just using formal expressions and grammar may alienate you from native speakers and make it more difficult to establish a real connection. So it is best to at least learn some common slang words and expressions if you’re planning to meet or speak socially with someone.

    2. Slang Words Are Used All Throughout Russian Culture

    If you turn on any popular Russian TV show, listen to any song, or watch any movie, you are quickly going to see the value of learning Russian slang phrases. Just like everyday conversations between native speakers, Russian culture is filled with slang phrases and expressions. Without at least some knowledge of the more common slang phrases, popular culture and most conversations will be very confusing and potentially alienating.

    Want to Amaze Native Speaker? Be a Good Lover? Our Vocabulary Lists are Made for You!

    3. Slang Expressions Help You Better Express Your True Thoughts and Feelings

    Only relying on formal grammar and vocabulary is very limiting, especially in social situations. Just like in your native language, using the appropriate Russian slang words can help you express a broader range of emotions, thoughts, and feelings.

    4. Proper Use of Slang Makes You Sound More Natural

    We’ve all met foreigners who technically used formal language perfectly but still sounded odd and well….foreign. But when you use the right slang words and expressions, you will sound more natural and like a true native speaker. If you notice, even most politicians include a sprinkling of slang expressions and words throughout their speeches to help them sound more natural and to better connect with the audience.

    The Dark Side of Slang Expressions

    Learning Russian slang words can indeed help you sound more natural, better understand the people and culture, and make integration much easier. However, there is a dark side: using the wrong slang expressions can also make you look foolish, uneducated, and potentially disrespectful.

    But how do you know which slang words or phrases to use and when?

    The truth is that you can’t learn the most modern and appropriate slang words in textbooks or formal classroom settings. By the time the information gets incorporated into a formal curriculum, it’s already outdated and no longer in use by actual Russian people. And while you can learn current slang expressions from Russian TV shows, movies, songs, and games, you may not understand the context. If that happens, you may use the right Russian slang words but in the wrong situation and still look like a fool or possibly even offend someone.

    Step out from the darkness and Get Your FREE PDF eBook to Start Learning Russian!

    So where can you learn current slang expressions and the right context in which to use them?

    At RussianPod101, native speaking instructors create audio and video lessons that can include slang expressions and words. Our instructors provide context and examples for all the Russian slang words used in any lesson to make sure students understand the right time and place to use them.

    Russian slang words and expressions may be grammatically incorrect but they are vital to truly understanding and immersing yourself in the culture. In fact, it will be very difficult to fully understand any movie, TV show, song, game, or even 1-on-1 conversation without knowing a few of the more common slang expressions.

    However, it is important to learn the proper context and use of even popular slang expressions or you may come across as confusing, disrespectful, or uneducated.
    At RussianPod101, you’ll learn how to use slang phrases and words to draw the right attention and avoid these problems.

    Don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on RussianPod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in Russian!

    How to Learn Russian in Your Car?

    How to Learn Russian in Your Car? Learn language in car

    Stuck in traffic? Losing time in your car? Have you ever felt that in all this wasted time, you could have watched the 750 episodes of One Piece, finished the last Super Mario ten times, or even better…you could have learned Russian? Between family, friends and work, in addition to this time-consuming commute, it can become difficult to find time to properly learn Russian.

    Fortunately, every problem has a solution, and what could be a better solution than turning that commute time into learning time? Stop passing the time mindlessly listening to the radio and try some of our best tips for mastering Russian in your car!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/3o6Mb2Qgu6RbzYlByU/giphy.gif

    Click Here To Start Learning Russian Right Now!

    You can learn Russian in your car, hands free
    While driving, it’s important that you keep your focus on the road, so this is why our top tips won’t require you to use your hands!

    Listening to Russian audio content in the car is a good way to learn
    This is because it is a fun and efficient way to learn. With RussianPod101.com podcasts, you will be able to discover Russian culture through topics about everyday life. Instead of the radio, listen to a Russian podcast adapted to your level, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and you will make progress sooner that you would expect!

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    You can listen to Russian music in the car
    Did you know that you can learn Russian by singing while driving? Listen to songs from cartoon or drama and try to identify some words you learned.

    Challenge yourself! Use the Russian you’ve studied up to this point and see how much you understand! Making the jump to real-life Russian is a scary one, but friendly children’s songs are a great place to start!

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    Click Here To Sign Up For A FREE Lifetime Account!

    You can learn alone in your car
    When you’re driving alone, you can be as loud as you want – there is nothing better for remembering your Russian lessons than repeating loudly, again and again. Next time you see a driver who seems to be talking alone, you will know he or she is just learning Russian!

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    You can learn through repetition with your passengers
    If there are passengers in the car, it can be more stimulating to learn together. You can set a role play with Russian dialogues. With RussianPod101.com, you can download all the lessons transcript including the dialogues, as a PDF. Print it out and have some fun speaking in Russian!

    One of the passengers can answer the quiz available on each of our lessons, while another can correct that person. Listening to someone at a more advanced level of Russian or a better accent is positive and helps you improve.

    You can learn Russian offline
    Do you have a poor connection or are unable to use the Internet? It’s not a problem for learning Russian! Before you start your commute, use our App to download the lessons you want to study and the podcast you want to listen to in your car, and you will be able to enjoy your lessons offline. Entering a tunnel won’t be a problem anymore. What a pleasure to listen to audio content without having the host freezing every 5 seconds!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/yjos61Qgsy17q/giphy.gif

    Click here to download the App and learn offline!

    You can learn every day at your own pace
    One of the best approaches for learning a language is little by little and often. It’s not efficient to take in a huge amount of information at one time. What you need is to study on a regular basis – a little bit of Russian every day. You commute several days a week, and that is all time you can take advantage of!

    You have the freedom to choose the lessons and podcasts you want to focus on, at your own rhythm. You may want to do a little revision or discover how to talk about a new topic. And if you’re wondering what to learn next, you can use the new Learning Paths, which is our customized pathway feature that gives you a step-by-step way to learn Russian without getting lost!

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    Click here to access Learning Paths at RussianPod101!

    If you don’t have a car and commute by another method, these tips are still valid! Learning Russian is no longer limited to the classroom or your house; there are so many benefits to learning in your car or elsewhere. Reaching a conversational level will take you less time than you could ever have imagined! Don’t forget to sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and enjoy our content!

    Five Tips To Avoid Common Mistakes

    The Focus of This Lesson is Tips to Help Russian Students Overcome Common Errors

    Tip 1: Learn Your Cases

      • There are no cases in English. That means that nouns and adjectives always stay the same no matter what their function and position in the sentence is. It’s different in Russian. The endings of nouns and adjectives change depending on their function.
        • Of course, it’s possible for a native speaker to understand someone who speaks like this but…
          • It can be irritating because you are slaughtering their language
          • It can be totally confusing!

            Tip 2: Watch Your Word Stress!

              • Like in English, word stress is extremely important. In Russian, you don’t say all the syllables of the word with the same strength, but accentuate one syllable.
                • If you don’t stress the right syllable, it can lead to confusion, and native speakers will have difficulty understanding you.
                  • Unfortunately, unlike in Italian or French, there are no rules to help you stress a word correctly. It’s just something you have to learn for each word.

                    Tip 3: Don’t Repeat the Verb in the Question

                      • In Russian, you use a different verb ending for “I” and “you” in the present. It is very common for English speakers to forget about it, as in English the verb doesn’t change. Also, they hear the ending -ешь in the question and tend to reply using ешь.

                        Tip 4: Watch Your Gender

                          • In Russian, the ending of the verb in the past tense changes depending on the gender and the plurality.
                          • If the subject is я or ты, use the ending -л if the pronoun refers to a man, and -ла if it refers to a woman.

                            Tip 5: Don’t Try to Translate “It”

                              • In Russian, the pronoun “it” doesn’t exist. We replace “it” with “he” or “she,” depending on their gender. That means, for example, that when you speak, you have to remember that книга (”a book”) is feminine, and that you should refer to it as она (”she”).


                                Russian Grammar is Easy!

                                This blogpost is a brief overview of different tenses and articles found in Russian language.

                                Tenses

                                • The Present
                                  • In English, you use a different tense in the present depending on whether it’s an action that happens regularly or it’s happening now. In Russian, you use just one tense in the present, no matter whether the action happens regularly or is happening now.
                                • The Past
                                  • The past form of regular verbs in English end in -ed. You have to learn irregular verbs individually. In English, there are many irregular verbs. Guess what? In Russian, there are hardly any irregular verbs in the past tense!
                                    • If the subject is masculine, the ending is -л:
                                      Он видел фильм.
                                      “He saw the film.”
                                    • If the subject is feminine, the ending is -лa:
                                      Она видела фильм.
                                      “She saw the film.”
                                    • If the subject is neuter, the ending is -ло:
                                      Письмо было на столе.
                                      “The letter was on the table.”
                                    • If the subject is plural, the ending is -ли:
                                      Они видели фильм.
                                      “They saw the film.”

                                Articles

                                • An article is a word that combines with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun.
                                • The articles in the English language are “the,” “a,” and “an.” In short, it is what you’re referring to (e.g., “the cat”). In Russian, there are no articles!

                                The Verb “To Be”

                                • In English, you have three forms of this verb,”am,” “is,” and “are.” In Russian, you should not use the verb “to be” in the present tense, so you don’t have to worry about it at all.

                                Making Questions

                                • In English, you need a different auxiliary depending on the tense, and you change the word order. In Russian, you just change your intonation. Nothing else changes.

                                Gender

                                • You can tell the gender just by looking at the ending of the word. Masculine nouns usually end in a consonant. Feminine nouns usually end in -а or -я. Neuter nouns usually end in -о or -е.

                                Introduction to Russian and Top 5 Reasons to Study

                                This Lesson Focuses on the history of the Russian languages and the top 5 reasons to study!

                                • Russia is the largest country in the world with a population of over 140 million people. It spans eleven time zones and contains the largest forest reserves in the
                                  world as well as a quarter of the earth’s fresh water within its lakes.
                                • The Russianlanguage has recieved numerous influences throughout history, including influences from Polish, German, and even Slavic.
                                • A lot of academic and intellectual vocabulary was used from languages such as Dutch, French, German, and even Latin. So by learning Russian, you get a sense
                                  of history, and the better you know it, the more familiarities you’ll pick up from other languages too.

                                Other than the amazing history of the Russian language and its huge geographical size we have composed a list of the top 5 reasons you should study Russian!

                                • Romance: Lots of people learn Russian because they either have or want a Russian partner.
                                • Business: Since the former Soviet Union opened its borders to foreigners, many businessmen travel to Russia and particularly the Ukraine.
                                • Travel and tourism: Russia has always attracted tourists by its historical past and culture. Russian theatre, and in particular, ballet, are famous all over the world.
                                • “Exotic”: Even though it’s considered challenging because it has a different alphabet, the Russian writing system makes it perhaps easier to learn than some other languages such as Arabic and Japanese.
                                • Extremely popular: According to estimations, between 144 and 160 million people speak Russian as their first language. It’s the eighth most spoken language in the world, before Japanese, German, French, and Italian. Still, people speak Russian natively in all former Soviet republics, some of which are part of the EU now such as Latvia. In Eastern Ukraine, for example, people speak Russian rather than Ukrainian.