RussianPod101.com Blog

Learn Russian with Free Daily
Audio and Video Lessons!
Start Your Free Trial 6 FREE Features

How to Find a Job in Russia: The Best Tips

Are you wondering what kind of job you could get in Russia and how easily you could get it? Your timing couldn’t be more perfect. The Olympic Games in Sochi 2014 and 2018 FIFA World Cup had a big impact on the job field in Russia. The number of foreigners-friendly jobs in Russia started to grow, giving these foreigners a chance to enjoy Russian life and to earn some money.

Russia’s growing economy also provides a lot of opportunities for starting or expanding a business, especially in the biggest Russian cities—Moscow and Saint-Petersburg.

So, let’s explore the Russian job market for foreigners and help you find the best job. Before you know it, you’ll be working and living in Russia with ease.

Start with a bonus, and download the Business Words & Phrases PDF for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Russian

Without further ado, here’s our guide on how to find a job in Russia.

Table of Contents

  1. Russian Job Market for Foreigners
  2. How to Search for a Job
  3. Jobs in Russia for English Speakers
  4. Tips on CVs and Interviews
  5. How to Say “Get a Job” in Russian
  6. Conclusion

1. Russian Job Market for Foreigners

1- The Best Cities to Work in Russia

There are a lot of beautiful places to see if you travel around Russia. But for a job, you need to come to the most crowded cities, such as Moscow and Saint-Petersburg.

Moscow

This is the capital of Russia and the biggest job market for foreigners. There’s a huge amount of big foreign companies that placed their Russian headquarters here, along with many foreign startups. When trying to find employment in Russia, Moscow should definitely be your go-to city.

Pros:

  • A huge international community
  • The biggest job market in Russia for foreigners
  • A lot of expat-oriented restaurants and bars
  • Most of the people know English
  • Impressive modern architecture and huge Soviet buildings

Cons:

  • A very crowded city with traffic jams and crowds in the underground in the rush-hour
  • Huge city territory; you’re most likely to live far from your work and spend from two to four hours for transportation per day

Saint-Petersburg

Russians call this the cultural capital of Russia as it has preserved the historical look from the XIX century. It also has a big job market for foreigners, but comparatively smaller than in Moscow.

Pros:

  • Beautiful and inspiring atmosphere
  • Lower living cost compared to Moscow

Cons:

  • Comparatively smaller salaries for the same position (than in Moscow)
  • Windy and rainy weather most of the time
  • Fewer people know English (compared to Moscow)

Other Cities (Sochi, Vladivostok, Irkutsk, Krasnodar, Rostov-na-Donu)

Of course, every city has its own beauty and provides specific opportunities. For example, Vladivostok is well-known among Asian countries, as it’s located next to the Eastern Russian border. So, Asian people are more likely to find a good job here. But basically, all the cities besides Moscow and Saint-Petersburg have several things in common.

Pros:

  • Clean air and lots of wild nature around
  • Low living cost

Cons:

  • Small salaries
  • Most people don’t know English
  • Small international community

2- Why Work in Russia?

No matter what city you choose to work in, you should know the main advantages of Russia for expanding your business or finding a working place. Here are some of the great benefits of working and living in Russia.

  1. Russia is the biggest consumer market in Europe. So, opening an office right here will bring you a lot of new customers.
  2. Highly educated but cheap manpower. This will also be great for your business expenses.
  3. Great ecology. As Russia is mostly covered with forests, the air is really fresh. You can enjoy all four seasons—relatively hot summer, gold autumn, white winter, and fresh spring.
  4. Cultural experience. There are a lot of perky cultural experiences that you’ll certainly enjoy while working in Russia—Russian saunas, fishing, hunting, and the list goes on.
  5. Cheap extreme experiences. You’ll find a lot of opportunities for extreme sport experiences—parachuting, paragliding, horse riding, skiing, snowboarding, etc.
  6. Spacy. You’ll be surprised by Russia’s extremely wide streets and high buildings, especially in Moscow. Several expats even say that everything in Russia is huge—well, the territory is big, so Russians aren’t shy in using it.

Documents

3- What Documents do Foreigners Need for a Russian Job?

In order to legally work in Russia, you need to have a working visa. To help you out, we’ve provided a rundown of the visa requirements to work in Russia.

Usually, the hiring company sends an official job offer to your native country. If you’re already in Russia, you’ll need to go back to your country in order to re-do the process of visa preparation. Remember that this visa gives you the right to work only at the company that initially sent you the offer.

You won’t need a work permit if you already hold a temporal Russian residence, for example if you officially study there or are acknowledged as a reporter or teacher.

Also, once you’ve found a job in Russia, make sure that you sign two contracts—one in Russian and one in your native language. This is a legal requirement in Russia in case you have any problems later and get sent to the court.

Researching

2. How to Search for a Job

1- How do Russians Search for a Job?

In the biggest Russian cities, people usually find jobs through Russian job search websites.

HeadHunter
This is the most popular Russian job hunting website, with more than eighteen-million visitors per month. There are a lot of vacancies for English speakers which you can check out right now. Some of the vacancies require other language speakers (e.g. French, German, etc.).

SuperJob
This is a less-popular website with no English interface or next to none English-speaking jobs. However, if you know Russian, you can find a good job here.

VK
This is the main Russian social network. Like Facebook, it has theme groups and communities. If you show a bit of creativity in your search, you can find some really good jobs or part-time jobs related to your native language. Search for groups with people who learn your native language. In almost every group there are public discussions which may have a job thread. If you’d like to teach a language, you can write to the owner of the group to put your ad post on the wall.

For example, if you’re an English native speaker you can search for английский язык (angliyskiy yazyk)—“English language.” The search will suggest a lot of groups for you. This would be the first one. Then open the list with discussions and search for a thread for private tutors. In Russian they’re called репетиторы (repetitory). In that group, this is the right thread. Leave your ad there and wait for students to contact you. Don’t forget to mention that you’re native speaker!

job hunting

2- Popular Russian Job Hunting Sites for Foreigners

LinkedIn
As Russia is getting more international, the use of this website is growing. Though the website’s blocked on the Russian territory, you can still use it by switching on any proxy app (e.g. friGate). Both employees and employers continue to use this job searching website.

Craigslist
This isn’t a very popular resource in Russia, as most of the Russian people don’t know about it and therefore don’t publish vacancies here. However, foreigners that already live in Russia sometimes publish part-time jobs here.

XpatJobs
This Russian job seeking website offers a lot of jobs for educated professionals.

Facebook
Don’t forget to search for a job in FB communities.

3. Jobs in Russia for English Speakers

Russia is a huge country with several job fields that are ready to get a hand from foreign specialists. Let’s see where else—besides the websites mentioned above—you can find a job in Russia, in the most popular sectors:

  • Russia Oil and Gas Jobs
    • As Russia is a big exporter of oil and gas, there are a lot of opportunities to find a job in this sector. Check the current vacancies.
  • Civil Engineering Jobs in Russia
  • Farm Manager Jobs in Russia
    • This isn’t a very popular job field for foreign specialists as it requires strong Russian language skills and provides poor salary. You can search for vacancies in this field on HeadHunter.
  • Nanny Jobs in Russia
    • As this kind of job isn’t well-paid and native Russian speakers are preferred over foreigners, there aren’t a lot of vacancies. You can still check them out on Expat.
  • Russia Hotel Jobs
    • As all hotels are both for Russians and for foreigners, you’ll need to have strong Russian-speaking skills. You can find vacancies on HeadHunter.
  • Restaurant Job in Russia
    • Similar to the hotel jobs, you’ll need good Russian language skills that you can master with RussianPod101. After that, find a fitting job on HeadHunter.
  • Teaching and Academics
    • This is probably the most popular field when finding employment in Russia, especially in Moscow. Find vacancies on HeadHunter, Gooverseas, or Learn4good.

4. Tips on CVs and Interviews

1- Russian Resume Tips

The resume doesn’t differ from the American and European ones. But here’s a lifehack. If you create a profile on HeadHunter, you can save the profile CV as a document and send it to potential employers. This will save you a lot of time!

Interview

2- Common Interview Questions in Russia and Other Tips

Be prepared to have several interviews for one position. First, you’ll talk with HR probably by phone and then in person. Only after that, HR will approve you for an interview with your future supervisor.

Be prepared to talk about your professional and personal goals, your strengths and weaknesses, and your plans for the next five years. Find the general information about the company and remember it. Feel free to use any English interview preparation material as Russian HRs usually use European and American experience. Here’s a nice video to get prepared.

3- Cultural Tips for an Interview

  1. Don’t be late. In Russia, it will portray you as a bad worker. Better to arrive earlier and wait for an arranged time.
  2. Wear professional clothes. For men it’s a suit and tie; for women it can be a professional skirt and blouse.
  3. When they offer you coffee or tea, feel free to refuse or accept it. In Russian culture, it’s just a welcome gesture that’s not really important.
  4. Be polite and calm.

5. How to Say “Get a Job” in Russian

Here’s a vocabulary list with the most useful job seeking terms in Russian.

  • Работа (rabota)—“work”
  • Вакансия (vakansiya)—“vacancy”
  • Подработка (podrabotka)—“part-time job”
  • Зарплата (zarplata)—“monthly salary” (please note that salaries in Russia are usually shown for one month)
  • ЗП (ZP)—“salary”; the abbreviation from Зарплата (zarplata)
  • Белая зарплата (belaya zarplata)—literally translated as “white salary” and means a legal salary. The thing is that a lot of the companies pay “black salary” (without notifying the authorities) or “gray salary” (half white, half black). So, white salary is a big “pro” in a job.
  • График работы (grafik raboty)—“work schedule”
  • Найти работу в Москве (nayti rabotu v Moskve)—“to find a job in Moscow”
  • Найти работу в Санкт-Петербурге (nayti rabotu v Sankt-Peterburge)—“to find a job in Saint-Petersburg”
  • Два через два (dva cherez dva)—a work schedule when you work two days in a row and then rest two days in a row, without any regard to the official weekends
  • Обязанности (obyazannosti)—“responsibilities”
  • Требования (trebovaniya)—“requirements”
  • Опыт (opyt)—“experience”
  • Стажёр (stazher)—“intern”

6. Conclusion

As you see, there are a lot of job possibilities for a foreigner in Russia. But you’ll definitely multiply your chances of getting a good position if you study Russian. We have the MyTeacher program for Russian-learners, which is sure to help you out here. Our teachers can help you to improve your Russian language skills to find a job in Russia and prepare you for the interview. With both Russian and your native language, you’ll have a huge advantage and get a great job offer. Keep reading RussianPod101 to improve your language skills.

We hope this article on finding a job in Russia was helpful to you, and that you found our suggested ways to find jobs in Russia practical. Thanks for reading, and best luck in your future Russian endeavors!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Russian

International Women’s Day in Russia: Happy Women’s Day!

Do you know what is the favorite holiday of all members of the fairer sex in Russia is? Naturally, it is March 8, the International Women’s Day, when men lavish care and attention on all women and give them presents to get them in a good mood. (Though this is also the day of the International Women’s Day protest in Russia!) In this lesson, we’ll tell you exactly how this spring holiday is celebrated in Russia here at RussianPod101.com!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

1. What is International Women’s Day in Russia?

International Women’s Day in Russia was celebrated for the first time on March 3, 1913. On March 8, 1917, striking workers and ordinary women took to the streets of Petrograd, marking in this way the actual start of the February revolution. In memory of that day, in 1921, the Soviet Union established the holiday of March 8 as an International Women’s Day. Since 1965, March 8 has been a non-working day as well.

2. When is International Women’s Day?

March 8 is International Women's Day

On March 8th, Women’s Day is celebrated throughout Russia as it is around the world.

3. Reading Practice: Women’s Day Celebrations

Read the Russian text below to find out about Women’s Day Russian traditions. You can find the English translation directly below it.

—–

В этот день все мужчины поздравляют женщин и дарят им подарки и цветы. При чем поздравлять можно не только своих любимых, но так же друзей, коллег, да и просто незнакомых женщин. 8 марта проходят различные мероприятия и концерты, а по телевидению традиционно показывают фильм “Служебный роман”. В качестве подарков дарят цветы, шоколад, ювелирные украшения и даже романтические поездки.

Так как 8 марта является выходным днём, то поздравлять и праздновать его начинают уже с 7 марта. На работе мужчины-коллеги поздравляют и дарят женщинам цветы, и, как правило, после работы накрывают небольшой праздничный стол. В некоторых компаниях даже устраивают корпоратив.

В России количество цветов в букете всегда должно быть нечетным. Четное количество цветов приносят только на похороны. Поэтому мужчинам следует быть очень внимательными, если они самостоятельно составляют букет.

—–

On this day, all men congratulate women and give them presents and flowers. Notably, congratulations can be given not only to your beloveds but also to friends, coworkers, and to unknown women as well. Many events and concerts take place on March 8, and the movie Office Romance (“Sluzhebny Roman”) is traditionally shown on TV. The presents can be flowers, chocolates, jewelry, and even romantic trips.

As March 8 is a non-working day, congratulations and celebrations begin as early as March 7. At the office, men congratulate their female coworkers and give them flowers; as a rule, after work, they lay a small festive table. Some companies even arrange a company party.

Bouquets in Russia should always be composed of an odd number of flowers. Even numbers of flowers are brought only to funerals. For that reason, men need to be very careful if they arrange a bouquet themselves.

4. Additional Information: Flowers

Breakfast Tray and Flower

What kind of flowers do you think women are given most often on March 8?

The undisputed leaders among the flowers most commonly given on March 8 are tulips or roses. It has recently become popular to give live flowers in pots.

5. Must-know Vocab

Male and Female Colleagues

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for International Women’s Day in Russia!

  • Завтрак (zaftrak) — “Breakfast
  • Женщина (zhenschina) — “Woman”
  • Мужчина (muschina) — “Man”
  • Девушка (devushka) — “Girlfriend”
  • Цветок (tsvetok) — “Flower”
  • Конфета (konfeta) — “Candy
  • Коллега (kollega) — “Colleague”
  • Подарок (podarok) — “Present”
  • Девочка (devochka) — “Girl”
  • Международный женский день (Mezhdunarodnyy zhenskiy den’) — “International Women’s Day”
  • Восьмое марта (Vas’moye marta) — “March 8th”
  • Букет (buket) — “Bouquet”
  • Внимание (vnimaniye) — “Attention”

If you want to hear each vocabulary word pronounced, visit our Russian International Women’s Day vocabulary list. Here you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio with its pronunciation.

Conclusion

Now you know more about International Women’s Day in Russia. Does your country celebrate International Women’s Day as well, or a similar holiday that honors and celebrates women? Let us know in the comments!

To learn more about Russian culture and the language, visit us at RussianPod101.com! We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Russian learners. You can also check out our MyTeacher program if you’re interested in a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal Russian teacher!

We hope you enjoyed learning about International Women’s Day in Russia with us! Know that all of your hard work and practice will pay off, and you’ll be speaking Russian like a pro before you know it! Until next time, we wish you much success!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

Russian Men’s Day: Defender of the Fatherland Day in Russia

Defender of the Fatherland Day (or День защитника Отечества) is a significant celebration to the Russian people. Formerly known as Red Army Day, Defender of the Fatherland Day is set aside to honor and celebrate those who serve (or have served) in the Russian army.

Learn the Russian language in context by exploring the country’s various holidays. By learning about Defender’s Day in Russia, you’re also allowing yourself to better understand the Russian culture and showing respect for its defenders as well.

Let RussianPod101.com guide you through the various aspects of Russian Army Day, including Defender of the Fatherland Day traditions.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

1. What is Russian Defender of the Fatherland Day?

Defender of the Fatherland Day, or in Russian, День защитника Отечества (Den’ zashchitnika atechestva), is the day reserved to celebrate those who defend the peace of Russia.

This holiday emerged after the 1918 Revolution and was initially called “Red Army Day” or in Russian День красной армии (Den’ krasnay armii). In the 1940s it was renamed “the Day of the Soviet Army,” or День советской армии (Den’ savetskay armii), then the holiday received its present name in 1995.

Nowadays most Russians consider this holiday a “men’s day.” This is related to the existence of a conscription law in Russia. Consequently, every young man who has served in the army, or в армии (v armii) in Russian, is already considered “a defender of his Fatherland.” “Fatherland” in Russian is Отечество (Atechestva).

2. When is Defender’s Day in Russia?

Defender of Fatherland Day on February 23

Russia celebrates Defender of the Fatherland Day each year on February 23. The 23 of February was chosen as this holiday’s date simply because it’s the Sunday just after the two events it commemorates:

  • Red Army drafts on February 17, 1918
  • Red Army establishment on February 18, 1918

3. Defender of the Fatherland Day Traditions

Celebrating with Fireworks

The holiday is celebrated at home or at a gathering at someone’s house. On that day, men not only receive presents, but there may also be parties at their places of work. While there’s not really a special Defender of the Fatherland Day food, we’re sure that men enjoy receiving a good home-cooked meal or tasty snack on this day.

On February 23, in many Russian cities, mass public events such as military parades, stunt performances, fairs, and car races take place. In Moskva, or Moscow in English, Sankt-Peterburg, or Saint Petersburg in English, Murmansk, and Smolensk, you can see festive fireworks.

Further, Defender of the Fatherland congratulations take place. This is a way of showing great appreciation and gratitude to those who are serving in the Russian army (or those who have served in the past).

There’s an interesting tradition in Moscow—the President lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which in Russian is called Могила неизвестного солдата (Magila neizvesnava saldata), and this is followed by a minute of silence and the National Anthem.

4. Additional Information

This is considered a masculine holiday in Russia (and is even known as “Men’s Day”), but what about the women who serve in the army? Are they also recognized and celebrated on Defender of the Fatherland Day? Read the Russian text below to find out (you can find the English translation below it).

—–

Оказывается, мужчины ждут своих подарков и внимания на 23 февраля не меньше, чем женщины на 8 марта. По этому поводу в России даже говорят:
“Как встретишь 23 февраля, так 8 марта и проведешь.”
В России женщин, которые служат в вооруженных силах, тоже поздравляют с праздником 23 февраля. Ну а как? Они же тоже, получается, защитницы нашей Родины - России.

—–
As it turns out, men look forward to receiving presents and attention on February 23 no less than women do on March 8, which is International Women’s Day, or in Russian, Международный женский день (Mezhdunarodnyy zhenskiy den’). In Russia there’s even a saying:

“How you celebrate February 23 shows how you’ll celebrate March 8.”

In Russia, the women who serve in the armed forces also receive congratulations on February 23. How else should it be? They are defenders of the Fatherland as well.

5. Must-know Vocab

Russian Army

Now that we’ve gone over holiday information, here’ some vocabulary you should know to better understand the day and celebrate it to the fullest.

  • Мужчина (muschina) — “man”
  • Солдат (soldat) — “soldier”
  • Подарок (podarok) — “present”
  • почтовая открытка (pachtovaya atkrytka) — “postcard”
  • Ветеран (veteran) — “veteran”
  • Салют (salyut) — “firework”
  • Патриотизм (patriatizm) — “patriotism”
  • Армия (armiya) — “army”
  • военный парад (voyennyy parad) — “military parade”
  • Родина (Rodina) — “motherland”
  • воинская служба (voinskaya sluzhba) — “military service”
  • 23 февраля (23 fevralya) — “February 23”
  • Защитник (zashchitnik) — “defender”
  • Поздравление (pazdravleniye) — “congratulation”
  • красная гвоздика (krasnaya gvazdika) — “red carnation”
  • День защитника Отечества (Den’ zashchitnika Otechestva) — “Defender of the Fatherland Day”

If you want to hear each vocabulary word’s pronunciation, check out our Russian Defender of the Fatherland Day vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed learning about Defender’s Day in Russia. What do you think of День защитника Отечества or Russia’s Defender of the Fatherland Day? Is there a similar holiday in your own country? Let us know in the comments!

For more information on Russian culture and the Russian language, visit us at RussianPod101.com. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and an online community to discuss lessons with fellow Russian students! You can even download our MyTeacher app for a one-on-one learning experience with your own personal Russian teacher.

Until next time, keep studying hard and practicing your vocabulary. And stay tuned for more Russian holiday articles. You’ll be a master of the Russian language and the country’s culture before you know it!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

How to Say I Love You in Russian - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Russian could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Russian partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At RussianPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Russian lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Russian dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Russian Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Russian Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Russian Faster?

Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Russian

1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Russian love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Russian word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Russian date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Russian Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • Не хочешь сходить со мной куда-нибудь поужинать?
  • Ne khochesh skhadit’ sa mnoy kuda-nibut’ pauzhinat’?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Russian is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • Ты свободна в эти выходные?
  • Ty svabodna v eti vykhadnyye?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • Сходим куда-нибудь?
  • Skhodim kuda-nibut’?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • Во сколько встретимся завтра?
  • Va skol’ka fstretimsya zavtra?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • Где встретимся?
  • Gde fstretimsya?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • Отлично выглядишь.
  • Atlichna vyglyadish.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • Ты такой милый.
  • Ty takoy milyy.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • Как тебе это место?
  • Kak tebe eta mesta?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Russian language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • Мы можем увидеться снова?
  • My mozhem uvidetsa snova?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • Пойдём куда-нибудь еще?
  • Paydyom kuda-nibut’ eshcho?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • Я знаю хорошее место.
  • Ya znayu kharosheye mesta.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • Я отвезу тебя домой.
  • Ya atvezu tebya damoy.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • Это был чудесный вечер.
  • Eta byl chudesnyy vecher.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • Когда мы увидимся снова?
  • Kagda my uvidimsya snova?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • Я тебе позвоню.
  • Ya tebe pazvanyu.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

Sneak Peek! Log in to Download this Cheat Sheet!Sneak Peek! Log in to Download this Cheat Sheet!

2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Russian phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Russian below!

Date Ideas in Russian

museum

  • музей
  • muzey

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • ужин при свечах
  • uzhin pri svechakh

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • сходить в зоопарк
  • skhadit’ v zaapark

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • устроить долгую прогулку
  • ustroit’ dolguyu pragulku

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • сходить в оперу
  • skhadit’ v operu

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • сходить в океанариум
  • skhadit’ v akeanarium

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • гулять по пляжу
  • gulyat’ pa plyazhu

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • устроить пикник
  • ustroit’ piknik

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • готовить еду вместе
  • gatovit’ edu vmeste

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • поужинать и посмотреть фильм
  • pauzhinat’ i pasmatret’ fil’m

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Russian

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Russian - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Russian Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Russian yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Russian? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Russian love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Russian

You mean so much to me.

  • Ты так много значишь для меня.
  • Ty tak mnoga znachish` dlya menya

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • Будешь ли ты моим Валентином?
  • Budesh` li ty maim Valentinom?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • Ты такая красивая.
  • Ty takaya krasivaya.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Russian, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • Ты для меня больше чем друг
  • Ty dlya menya bol`she chem drug

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Russian dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • Даже 100 сердец будет слишком мало чтобы выразить всю мою любовь к тебя.
  • Dazhe 100 serdets budet slishkam malo chtoby vyrazit` vsyu mayu lyubov` k tebe.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • Любовь, это просто любовь. Её никогда нельзя объяснить.
  • Lyubov’, eto prosto lyubov’. Yeyo nikagda nel`zya ob`yasnit`

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • Ты так красив.
  • Ty tak krasiv.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Russian love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • Ты мне нравишься.
  • Ty mne nravish`say.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • Ты заставляешь меня быть лучшим мужчиной.
  • ty zastavlyaesh` menya byt` luchshim muzhchinai.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Russian girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • Пусть всё что ты делаешь, будет сделано в любви.
  • Pust` vsyo chto ty delaesh`, budet sdelana v lyubvi.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • Ты моё солнце, моя любовь.
  • Ty mayo solntse, maya lubov`.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • Слова не могут описать мою любовь к тебе.
  • Slava ne mogut apisat’ mayu lyubov’ k tebe.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • Мы встретились чтобы быть вместе.
  • My vstretilis` chtoby byt` vmeste.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • Если вы думаете о ком-то, читая это, Вы определённо влюблены.
  • Yesli vy dumaete a kom-to chitaya eta, vy apredelyona vlyubleny.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

I love you.

  • Я люблю тебя.
  • Ya lyublyu tebya.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Russian carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

5. Russian Quotes about Love

Russian Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Russian lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Russian that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Russian Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Russian lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Russian custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Russian Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Нам нужно поговорить.
    • Nam nuzhna pagavarit’.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Дело не в тебе, а во мне
    • Delo ne v tebe, a va mne

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Russian lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Я просто не готов к такого рода отношениям.
    • Ya prosta ne gatov k takova roda atnasheniyam.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Давай останемся друзьями
    • Davay astanemsya druz`yami

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Russian, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Я думаю, нам стоит сделать перерыв.
    • Ya dumayu, nam stoit sdelat’ pereryv.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Ты заслуживаешь лучшего.
    • Ty zasluzhivayesh’ luchshego.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Мы должны начать встречаться с другими людьми.
    • My dolzhny nachat’ vstrechatsyas s drugimi lyud`mi.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Мне нужно больше свободы.
    • Mne nuzhno bol`she svabody

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Я думаю, что мы слишком спешим.
    • Ya dumayu, chto my slishkam speshim

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Мне нужно сосредоточиться на своей карьере.
    • Mne nuzhno sasredatochit’sya na svoyey kar’yere.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Я не достаточно хорош для тебя.
    • Ya ne dastatachno khorosh dlya tebya.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Я больше не люблю тебя.
    • Ya bol`she ne lyublyu tebya.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Мы просто не подходим друг другу.
    • My prosta ne padkhodim drug drugu.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Так будет лучше
    • Tak budet luch`she

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Мы отдалились друг от друга.
    • My atdalilis’ drug ot druga.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Russian faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. RussianPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Russian language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Russian Faster!

    null

    1- Being in a love relationship with your Russian speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    RussianPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Russian, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Russian even faster.

    2- Having your Russian romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Russian language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Russian lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Russian partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why RussianPod101 helps you learn Russian Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Russian

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Russian is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at RussianPod101 is translated into both English and Russian. So, while your partner can help you learn Russian faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Russian Culture
    At RussianPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Russia. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Russian partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Russian Phrases
    You now have access to RussianPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Russian soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

    Learning A Language on Your Own

    Can You Really Learn Russian Alone?

    Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

    Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Russian or any language without traditional classroom instruction: RussianPod101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is RussianPod101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

    Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Russian or any language alone.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

    3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

    Learning Alone

    1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

    In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Russian alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

    2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

    Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Russian alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Russian and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

    3. Learning Russian Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

    Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

    How to Learn a Language on Your Own with RussianPod101

    Learning with RussianPod101

    1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Russian Audio & Video Lessons

    The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Russian conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. RussianPod101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Russian instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Russian actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

    2. “Learning Paths” with Russian Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

    Although RussianPod101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, RussianPod101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

    3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

    When you have the right tools and Russian learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, RussianPod101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

    • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
    • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
    • Review Quizzes
    • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
    • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
    • Russian Dictionary with Pronunciation
    • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
    • And Much More!

    Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Russian alone and reach your goals!

    Conclusion

    Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Russian on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

    RussianPod101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, RussianPod101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

    And the best part is: With RussianPod101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    Language Learning Tips: How to Avoid Awkward Silences

    Avoid Awkward Silences

    Yes, even beginners can quickly learn conversational Russian well enough to carry on real conversations with native speakers. Of course, beginners won’t be able to carry a conversation the same way they could in their native language. But, just knowing a few tips like which questions to ask to keep a conversation going are all you need to speak and interact with real native speakers! But before we get to specific suggestions, let’s first take a closer look at how having real Russian conversations is so vital to your mastery of the language.

    Learning to Carry a Conversation is Vital to Mastery of Any Language

    Communicating with other people is the very point of language and conversation is almost second nature in our native tongue. For beginners or anyone learning a new language, conversations aren’t easy at all and even simple Russian greetings can be intimidating and awkward.

    However, there are 3 vital reasons why you should learn conversational Russian as quickly as possible:

    • Avoid Awkward Silences: Nothing kills a conversation faster than long periods of awkward silence, so you need practice and specific strategies to avoid them.
    • Improve the Flow of Conversation to Make a Better Impression: When you know what to say to keep a conversation going, communication becomes much easier and you make a better impression on your listener.
    • Master the Language Faster: Nothing will help you learn to speak Russian faster and truly master the language than having real conversations with native speakers. Conversations quickly expose you to slang, cultural expressions, and vocabulary that force you to absorb and assimilate information faster than any educational setting—and that’s a great thing!

    But how can you possibly have real conversations with real Russian people if you are just starting out?

    3 Conversation Strategies for Beginners

    Conversation

    1. Ask Questions to Keep a Conversation Going

    For beginners and even more advanced speakers, the key is to learn to ask questions to keep a conversation going. Of course, they can’t be just random questions or else you may confuse the listener. But, by memorizing a few key questions and the appropriate time to use them, you can easily carry a conversation with minimal vocabulary or experience. And remember, the more Russian conversations you have, the quicker you will learn and master the language!

    2. Learn Core Vocabulary Terms as Quickly as Possible

    You don’t need to memorize 10,000’s of words to learn conversational Russian. In fact, with just a couple hundred Russian words you could have a very basic Russian conversation. And by learning maybe 1,000-2,000 words, you could carry a conversation with a native speaker about current events, ordering in restaurants, and even getting directions.

    3. Study Videos or Audio Lessons that You Can Play and Replay Again and Again

    If you want to know how to carry a conversation in Russian, then you need exposure to native speakers—and the more the better. Ideally, studying video or audio lessons is ideal because they provide contextualized learning in your native language and you can play them again and again until mastery.

    RussianPod101 Makes it Easier and More Convenient Than Ever to Learn Conversational Russian

    Learning Russian

    For more than 10 years, RussianPod101 has been helping students learn to speak Russian by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Russian fast using our proven system:

    • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Russian Instructors: RussianPod101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Russian vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Russian and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
    • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
    • 2000 Common Russian Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

    In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

    Conclusion

    Although it may seem intimidating for a beginner, the truth is that it is very easy to learn conversational Russian. By learning a few core vocabulary terms and which questions to ask to keep a conversation going, just a little practice and exposure to real Russian conversations or lessons is all it really takes. RussianPod101 has created the world’s largest online collection of video and audio lessons by real instructors plus loads of advanced tools to help you learn to speak Russian and carry a conversation quickly.

    Act now and we’ll also include a list of the most commonly used questions to keep a conversation going so you can literally get started immediately!

    Tatiana Day: How to Celebrate Russian Students’ Day

    День российского студенчества (Den’ rassiyskava studenchestva) or “Russian Students’ Day,” also called Tatiana Day, is a day of great celebration among Russian youth. Not only does this day mark the end of the first school term (and therefore the end of finals!), it also holds great historical significance and is filled with lavish parties.

    As is true for all Russian holidays, learning about Tatiana Day in Russia will provide you with great insight into Russian culture and history. Find out more about the origins of Russian Students’ Day and how this holiday’s celebrated in Russia with RussianPod101.com!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    1. What is Russian Students’ Day?

    Considering how many Russian holidays and celebrations there are, what makes Tatiana Day so important?

    Students’ Day in Russia seeks to commemorate and celebrate the day in 1775 that Empress Elizabeth officially allowed a petition to go through for the development of a university in Moscow (this was the first-ever Russian university). Ivan Shuvalov initially began this petition, as Russia’s then-Minister of Education.

    Not long after this event, a church (namely the Church of St. Tatiana) was built on the campus of this university, thus giving this Russian holiday its name.

    For this reason, it’s thought that St.Tatiana is a “patron saint” of Russian students, meaning that she fully approves, oversees, and protects them throughout the country.

    This holiday also serves as a reflection of how important both education and religion are to Russia and its people. (Soon we’ll see how partying and fun play into this as well.)

    2. Russia Students’ Day Date

    Russian Students' Day is January 25

    Each year, Russians celebrate Russian Students’ Day on “January 25” or 25 января (25 yanvarya).

    3. How is Tatiana Day in Russia Celebrated?

    Celebrating with a Party

    This Russian holiday’s celebrated all over Russia, though previously it was only celebrated in Moscow. For Russians, this is a Выходной (vykhadnoy) or “day off,” especially for students who worked and studied hard during the first school term. While it’s celebration does resemble other Russian holidays and traditions, it does have its unique facets.

    Russian Students’ Day is celebrated by attending a large ceremony at the St. Tatiana church at the Moscow State University. This ceremony often involves singing by a choir.

    Afterward, however, is when the real fun begins.

    Many Russian students use this day to throw a Вечеринка (vecherinka) or “party,” especially in bars or restaurants. As you can guess, there’s also a lot of drinking; it’s even expected and therefore local authorities let it slide. (Completing finals week is definitely worthy of a few drinks, wouldn’t you agree?)

    Another fascinating aspect of this holiday is the lighting of the symbolic чаша знаний (chasha znaniy) or “cup of knowledge” at the Lomonosov Monument. When evening arrives, Russians celebrate Tatiana Day with a lovely and colorful fireworks display. Nice way to end the occasion, we think!

    4. Additional Information

    This Russian holiday, along with being a celebration for students and regarding education, is a day to honor the St. Tatiana. Due to the greatness of St. Tatiana, many parents name their female children after her, and so this Russian holiday has also become a special day for those named Tatiana. Some people refer to this as a “name day.”

    5. Must-Know Vocab for Russian Students’ Day

    • Ученик (uchenik) — “Student” [masc.]
    • Январь (yanvar‘) — “January”
    • Общежитие (apshchezhytiye) — “Dormitory”
    • Университет (universitet) — “University”
    • Студент (student) — “University student” [masc.]
    • Студентка (studentka) — “University student” [fem.]
    • День российского студенчества (Den’ rassiyskava studenchestva) — “Russian Students’ Day”
    • Вечеринка (vecherinka) — “Party”
    • Выходной (vykhadnoy) — “Day off”
    • 25 января (25 yanvarya) — “January 25th”
    • Татьянин день (Tat’yanin den’) — “Tatiana Day”
    • Однокурсник (adnakursnik) — “Classmate” [masc.]
    • Oднокурсница (adnakursnitsa) — “Classmate” [fem.]

    If you would like to hear each word pronounced, be sure to visit our Tatiana Day in Russia vocabulary list. Each vocabulary word here is accompanied by an audio file for your convenience.

    Conclusion

    We’ve covered the basics of Russian Students’ Day, as well as the most important vocabulary related to this holiday. We hope you had fun learning this little aspect of Russia’s culture and found our article insightful.

    If you want to learn even more, be sure to visit us at RussianPod101.com! We offer vocabulary lists on multiple topics, insightful blog posts, and even have an online community where you can discuss what you’re learning with fellow Russian language-learners. And if you prefer a more one-on-one approach to learning, you can download our MyTeacher app and get the best possible learning experience!

    Be sure to brush up on your Russian culture knowledge as well, and we know you’ll be speaking like a well-cultured native before you know it. Also keep in mind that we’re going to be publishing more Russian holiday posts soon!

    Until next time, we’re wishing you the best in all your language-learning endeavors.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    How to Transform Your Daily Commute Into Learning a Language

    Learn a language during your commute!

    Today, classrooms are no longer the only or even best place to learn a new language like Russian. More and more people are finding that they can easily learn a language just about anywhere they have a few minutes of spare time, including their daily commute to work. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average American spends over 50 minutes a day commuting to and from work, or over 300 hours a year.

    Rethinking Your Daily Commute to Work

    But rather than simply sitting in traffic and wasting the time, you can instead use your daily commute to literally learn Russian in just a few short months! RussianPod101 has developed specialized learning tools that you can use on your commute to work (and home again) to master the language in your spare time. Keep reading to learn how to get your free audiobook to use on your next commute so you can see for yourself how easy it is to transform “dead time” into realizing your dream of learning a new language!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    But before we look at how to transform your commute home into a mini-classroom, let’s take a closer look at 4 reasons why traditional classroom settings just aren’t the best option for most people in today’s fast-paced world.

    • Difficulty Getting to and From Class
    • Learning on Someone Else’s Schedule
    • Very Expensive and May Cost $1,000’s to Complete
    • Can Take Years to Finally Complete Classes and Learn the Language

    The simple truth is that traditional classroom instruction is simply not a viable option for most people in today’s very fast-paced, time-starved world. Now let’s examine how you can learn a language faster, more easily, and at far less expense than traditional classes—all during your commute to work and back home again!

    Bus

    3 Reasons Your Daily Commute Can Help You Master a Language

    1. The Average Commute Time is More than 300 Hours Per Year

    Between the commute to work and getting back home again, over 6 hours a week is completely wasted and not helping you reach any goals or objectives. But thanks to online language learning platforms with audiobooks and other resources that you can access during your commute, you can easily transform wasted time into tangible progress towards learning a new language. With over 300 hours available annually, your daily commute could provide you with enough time to literally master a new language each and every year!

    2. Increase Your Earning Potential While Commuting to Work

    How would you like to transform all those spare commuting hours each week into more money for a new car, house, or even a dream vacation? According to research, someone making $30,000 per year can boost their annual income by $600 or more per year by learning a second language. Added up over the course of a lifetime, you can boost your total earnings by $70,000 or more while achieving your dream of learning a new language during your daily commute!

    How? From work-at-home translation jobs to working overseas, there are many ways to leverage your second language into more money in your bank account! So instead of wasting your precious time, you can make your commute more productive and profitable and the more languages you learn, the higher your income potential.

    3. Repetition is Key to Mastering a New Language

    Not sure if it’s practical to learn another language while commuting to and from work each day? Well not only is it possible—learning in your car on the way to and from work each day can actually help you learn and master Russian or any language much faster! The simple truth is that repetition is absolutely vital to truly internalizing and mastering any language. So, if you listen to audiobooks or even audio lessons on your commute to work and then repeat the same lesson on your commute home, the information is more likely to be “locked-in” to your long-term memory!

    Learning

    5 Ways RussianPod101 Makes It Easy to Learn a Language On Your Commute

    RussianPod101 has been helping people just like yourself learn and master Russian in the comfort of their home, during their daily commute, or any place they have a few minutes of spare time. Here are five features provided by RussianPod101 that make it easy to learn a new language while commuting to and from work:

    1. The Largest Collection of Audio Lessons on Planet by Native Speaking Instructors
    Every single week, RussianPod101 creates new audio lessons by native speaking instructors. All lessons are short, to the point, and guaranteed to improve your mastery of Russian.

    2. Word of the Day
    Simply exposing yourself to new information and vocabulary terms helps increase your fluency and mastery of Russian. So every single day, RussianPod101 adds a new Word of the Day for you to learn and memorize during your commute.

    3. Daily Dose Mini-Lessons
    Have a short commute to work but still want to make progress towards learning and mastering Russian? Not a problem! Our Daily Dose Mini-Lessons are 1-minute or less and designed to improve your grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation.

    4. All Content Available on a Convenient Mobile App
    You don’t need a PC or tablet to learn Russian during your daily commute. At RussianPod101, all of our lessons, tools, and resources are available 24/7 via our Mobile App. That means you can access all of our audio lessons and other tools during your commute to work or any time you have a few spare moments!

    5. Audiobooks and Other Supplemental Resources
    In addition to the world’s largest online collection of HD audio lessons, RussianPod101 has also created several audiobooks to enhance your understanding and make it more convenient than ever to learn a language during your commute!

    Conclusion

    The average commute time of most Americans is over 300 hours each year and it’s the perfect opportunity to learn and master a new language. In fact, you can use the “dead time” during your daily commute to learn a new language and potentially boost your lifetime earnings by up to $70,000 or more! Whatever your motivation, RussianPod101 has the tools and resources necessary to help you learn a new language each year during your commute to and from work. Act now and we’ll even provide you with a free audiobook to try out on your next commute!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    How to Say Hello in Russian: 30 Unique Greetings

    How to Say Hello in Russian

    Have you ever thought about how the choice of words when greeting sets the mood for the whole conversation? Hello. Howdy. What’s up. Yo. Aloha. Salute. Do you feel the difference between how these words affect the situations they’re used in? The same concept is true for the Russian language. There are a lot of different greeting words in there and you should try to understand and imagine every situation in which they could be used. That said, here are some Russian greetings for beginners.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    1. Russian Greetings for Beginners

    There are two basic ways to say “Hello” in Russian.

    • Здравствуйте (zdravstvuyte) — This is a formal Russian greeting for “Hello.” If you ask a local: “How do you say ‘Hello’ in Russian?” he’ll teach you this word. Use it when you meet elder people, people you have a great respect for, and people you have the intention to become buddies with.
      • Another version of this Russian greeting is Здравствуй (zdravstvuy)—“Hello.” Don’t confuse it with the previous one. This is a much less formal greeting and is usually addressed to younger people or people of the same age, who are not close friends. For example, a teacher could use it to greet a new student in the class.
    • Привет (privet)—“Hi” in Russian. If you ask a local: “How do you say ‘Hi’ in Russian?” he’ll most definitely tell you this greeting. This is the most common Russian informal greeting. It’s great to use in every informal situation.

    2. Formal Hello in Russian

    • Доброе утро (dobroe utro)—this is essentially how to say “Good morning” in Russian. If you ask a local: “How do you say ‘Good morning’ in Russian?” without a doubt, he’ll tell you this translation. It could be used both in formal and informal situations—just as it can be in English. Доброе (dobroe) means “Kind,” so this is sort of like wishing a person to have “a kind morning.” But the meaning is still similar to the English greeting.
    • Добрый день (dobryy den`)—“Good day” or “Good afternoon” in Russian translation. This greeting is used mostly in formal situations.
    • Добрый вечер (dobryy vecher)—“Good evening” in Russian. This greeting is also used mostly in formal situations.
    • Shake Hands

    • Приветствую (privetstvuyu)—“Hello” in Russian. This is between formal and informal when it comes to Russian greetings. Men could address friends with this greeting in order to appear more “manly.” Feel free to use this during friendly gatherings when you take a word and address everyone. For example, “Hello comrade” in Russian is Приветствую вас, товарищи! (Privetstvuyu vas, tovarishchi!).
    • Добро пожаловать! (Dobro pozhalovat`!)—“Welcome” in Russian. This is rarely used in everyday life. But it’s often used on TV shows or official events to greet guests. So, if you’re wondering “How do you say ‘Welcome to Russia’ in Russian?” then the answer is Добро пожаловать в Россию! (Dobro pozhalovat` v Rossiyu!).
    • Алло (allo)—is the Russian word for “Hello” when answering the phone in Russian in both formal and informal situations. However, if you want to be even more official and respectful—e.g. to a higher-ranked person—use Да, здравствуйте (Da, zdravstvuyte) which means “Yes, hello.”
      • Алё (alyo)—“Hello.” This is another way to say Алло (allo) when you answer the phone in Russian, if you’re going for a less formal approach. A lot of people use both of them.
      • Але (ale)—“Hello.” This is also an option to answer a phone call. It’s used mostly by young people who want to look original.
    • Доброго времени суток (dobrogo vremeni sutok)—“Good time of the day.” This phrase is popular in correspondence situations where the sender doesn’t know when the receiver opens the email and reads it. But be careful, as some people hate this greeting because it feels too original and appears to be just temporal fashion.

    Russian Greetings

    3. Informal “Hi” in Russian

    • Приветик (privetik); приветики (privetiki)—“Hello” in Russian informal language. These greetings are formed from the basic Привет (privet)—“Hi” and are used by girls when trying to be cute. Guys rarely use them, but when they do they mean to flirt.
    • Здорово (zdorovo); здарова (zdarova); здаров (zdarov); здоров (zdorov); даров (darov)—“Hi.” This popular and cool way to greet in Russian is usually used by millennials. You need to already be good friends with the person to say it.
    • Дратути (dratuti)—“Hi.” This is an original greeting that comes from Internet memes and chats. This is usually used by computer geeks.

    1- Phrasal Informal Greetings

    • О, какие люди! (O, kakie lyudi!)—“Oh, that’s you!” This phrase is how Russians greet when they unexpectedly meet one or several friends/family members.
    • Сколько лет, сколько зим! (Skol`ko let, skol`ko zim)—“Long time, no see.” Literally, it means “How many winters, how many summers (we haven’t seen each other)” and is used when you haven’t seen a person for a really long time.
    • Здравия желаю! (Zdraviya zhelayu!)—“Hello” in Russian formal military style.
    • С приездом! (S priezdom!)—“Welcome!” It’s used when the person just arrived somewhere.
      • С прилётом! (S prilyotom!)—“Welcome!” This one is used when the person just arrived somewhere by plane.

    2- Greetings from Other Languages

    • Аллоха (Allokha)—“Aloha.” This is the original way to greet used by modern millennials and young bloggers.
    • Салют (Salyut)—“Salute.” This is another original way to say “Hi.”
    • Хэллоу (Khellou)—“Hello.” It’s usually used by people who know English and try to look modern and original. There are a lot of other greetings that were taken from the English language and mean the same:
      • Хай (Khay)—“Hi” in Russian.
      • Хей (Khey)—“Hey” in Russian. So, if you’re wondering how to say “Hey” in Russian, the answer is easy—Хей (Khey).
      • Хэлло (Khello)—“Hello” in Russian.
      • Хаюшки (Khayushki)—cute form of “Hi” in Russian.
      • Йоу (You) —“Yo” in Russian.

    3- Russian Greeting Slang Words and Interesting Greetings for Advanced Learners

    Greeting

    • Моё почтение (Moyo pochtenie); наше почтение (nashe pochtenie)—“Hello.” This is an old way to say “hello” among high society members. It can be used today to bring in the atmosphere from that time.
    • Здрасти-мордасти (Zdrasti-mordasti)—“Hi.” It’s usually used by very old people, and is considered an outdated Russian greeting.
    • Мир вам (Mir vam)—“Let the peace be with you.” This greeting is basically used by churchmen and religious people, and also comes from the old times.
    • Наше вам почтение (Nashe vam pochtenie)—“We express our respect to you.” This is yet another Russian greeting that comes from old times. Nowadays, it may be used by old people.
    • Ку! (Ku!)—“Hi” from the film “Кин-дза-дза!” (kin-dza-dza). This is usually used by people who have watched this film.
    • Физкульт-привет! (Fizkul`t-privet!)—“Hi” from the film “Джентльмены удачи” (Dzhentl`meny udachi). This is how Russians greet people who are training. As the film is a Soviet one, this greeting is used mostly by older people.

    4. Following Questions

    Wanna know how to say “How are you?” in Russian? All these questions may follow the informal greeting, and most of them—except one—have this meaning.

    • Как дела? (Kak dela?)—“How are you doing?” in Russian. This is the most common question to start a conversation. This is used by everyone.
      • Как ты? (Kak ty?)—“How are you?” This one is another, more personal way to ask Как дела? (Kak dela?).
      • Как оно? (Kak ono?)—“How is it? How are you doing?” This Russian greeting is very popular nowadays, especially among millennials.
    • Как жизнь? (Kak zhizn`?)—“How is your life?” Essentially, this means the same as Как дела? (Kak dela?) but is used less often by older people.
      • Как жизнь молодая? (Kak zhizn` molodaya?)—“How is your young life going?” This is used by older people to the younger generation when they haven’t seen each other for a long time.
    • Рад тебя видеть (Rad tebya videt`)—“Glad to see you.” This is one of the more popular Russian greetings between friends, and is typically used to address good friends.
    • Как поживаешь? (Kak pozhivayesh’?)—“How are you doing?” This is usually used by older people and mostly in letters and emails.
    • Что нового? (Shto novogo?)—“What’s new?” This means the same as Как дела? (Kak dela?) but is less general. Ask it if you want to know what new things happened with the person during the time you were apart.
      • Что новенького? (Shto noven`kogo?)—“What’s new?” This is a cuter way of saying Что нового? (Chto novogo?).
      • Какие новости? (Kakie novosti?)—“What is the news?” This means the same as Как дела? (Kak dela?) but is used to greet more distant friends.
    • Чем занимаешься? (Chem zanimaesh’sya?)—“What are you doing?” in Russian. For the same meaning, you can also use Что делаешь? (Chto delayesh’?).

    So, if you wanna say: “Hello. How are you?” in Russian, you can say: Привет. Как ты? (Privet. Kak ty?).

    5. Fun Exercise: Check Yourself and Choose the Right Greeting

    Greeting

    Read a dialogue between two people and choose a greeting that fits.

    1. Лена: _______ Что делаешь вечером? Го гулять. (Lena: ______ Chto delaesh’ vecherom? Go gulyat’.)
    Антон: Сорян, занят. Давай завтра? (Anton: Soryan, zanyat. Davay zavtra?)
    Лена: Ок. Спишемся тогда. (Lena: Ok. spishemsya togda.)

    Choose the right answer:
    1. Физкульт-привет!
    2. С приездом!
    3. Здаров.
    4. Здравствуйте.

    Lena: “_______ Any plans for the evening? Let’s have a walk.”
    Anton: “Sorry, busy. Tomorrow?”
    Lena: “Sure. Let’s get in touch later then.”

    2. Вадим: Здравствуйте. К сожалению, не успеваю выслать дизайн сайта на просмотр сегодня. Если вышлю завтра утром - будет нормально? (Vadim: Zdravstvuyte. K sozhaleniyu, ne uspevayu vyslat` dizayn sayta segodnya. Yesli vyshlyu zavtra utrom - budet normal`no?)
    Толя: ________. Да, хорошо. Буду ждать (Tolya: ________. Da, khorosho. Budu zhdat`.)
    Вадим: Благодарю. (Vadim: Blagodaryu.)

    Choose the right answer:
    1. Мир вам.
    2. Добрый день.
    3. Приветики.
    4. Дратути.

    Vadim: “Hello. Unfortunately, I can’t send you the website design today. Will tomorrow morning be okay?”
    Tolya: “________. Sure. Will be waiting for it.”
    Vadim: “Thank you.”

    6. Conclusion

    So, now you can say “Hi. How are you?” in Russian in many different ways and are able to choose a proper greeting according to the situation. Don’t hesitate to use some of the uncommon greetings that we described above while you’re learning. But in any important situation, just stick to the most regular ones—Привет (Privet) and Здравствуйте (Zdravstvuyte).

    Official “Hello” in Russian English spelling could be tricky, as the Russian letter в (v) is quiet, so check Здравствуйте (Zdravstvuyte) several times before sending it to your Russian partner or colleague.

    Keep reading RussianPod101 and learn interesting Russian words and expressions that you can start using right away. For example, learn how to say “Good night” in Russian or how to say “Goodbye” in Russian translation in our next articles!

    For now, keep practicing these Russian greetings and introductions so that you can be a pro in no time! We hope this Russian greeting guide has helped you to learn all about Russian greetings. Best of luck with your continued learning!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    My 5 Tips for Getting the Most Out of RussianPod101

    My 5 Tips for Getting the Most Out of RussianPod101

    We are so lucky. Think about it: if you wanted to learn Russian (or any other skill) even 25 years ago, you would’ve needed to go to the library, take expensive classes and hunt down the right information. Instead of spending your time practicing, you would be busy doing other things. Now, with a quick Google search you can find literally anything you need for learning Russian on the internet:

    • Forgot the genitive plural of female nouns? Wikipedia has a detailed page explaining those.
    • Want to watch Russian movies with subtitles? Check out Youtube (Mosfilm in particular).
    • Or like to put your Russian to the test with a one-on-one lesson with a native Russian speaker? Tons of online platforms where you can have Skype lessons.

    So it’s no longer a lack of materials or resources that holds you back. But rather finding the time and motivation to put them into practice.

    If you’re already listening to the podcasts of RussianPod101, and find that you’re lacking this time or motivation – then here are some of my tips and tricks that I’ve used over the last couple of years to get the most out RussianPod101:

    Podcast

    1. Aim for 1 podcast every day

    It’s easy to set the bar high and want to put 2 hours of Russian practice in every day. But for most of us that’s not realistic. Do you want to sit behind your desk to practice Russian – even after a long day at work? Probably not.

    But if you take it easy, and do a small thing consistently, you’ll find that you’ll make progress almost without noticing it.

    Listen to 1 podcast every day. They’re only 10-15 minutes and everyone can make time for that. Even on your worst day, you’ve got 15 minutes, right? Listening to 1 podcast per day will ensure that your brain gets the time off to digest everything you’ve learned. And that you can come back the next day fresh and ready for a new lesson.

    Tip: get some sort of habit tracker app on your phone and every day that you listen to a Russian podcast, add a checkmark.

    Lesson Review Tool

    2. Use the lesson review tools

    If you want to go the extra mile after listening to the podcast, then use the lesson review tools. A quick review of what you’ve learned will ‘cement’ the information in your brain. And it will make it 10X more effective. Repetition is key when learning Russian – so the more you see/practice a specific word or phrase, the better you’ll remember it.

    Tip: make sure to get 8 hours of sleep every night. Sleep is crucial for memory retention and learning new things.

    3. Take the 2000 most common words and put them in a spaced repetition app

    It’s said that around 600 words make up 80% of all the words in major newspapers. So why not apply this principle in your Russian studies? Take it a step further: if you learn the 2000 most common words, I’m sure you’ll have no problem getting around in Russia.

    The list from RussianPod101 is a great tool for this. It has example phrases with the word and you can listen to the correct pronunciation (which is perfect, because of the random nature of stresses in Russian words).

    It works even better when you get a spaced repetition program and create your own flashcard deck. This is especially effective if you have it on your phone. So you can practice a couple of words whenever you’re standing in line at the grocery store, waiting for someone or when travelling.

    Tip: use the built-in flashcards from RussianPod101. Or download the free app Anki on your phone and manually enter every word that you find difficult.

    Dead Time

    4. Make use of ‘dead’ time

    How much time do you spend every week doing the following tasks:

    • Commuting to work/school
    • Doing groceries
    • Walking
    • Cleaning

    It’s probably more than a couple of hours, right? Don’t waste this time. Use it instead to listen to Russian podcasts. You’ll free up time for other activities. And you’ll get better at Russian without specifically scheduling time to practice.

    This is one of the ‘secrets’ that separates successful Russian learners from others. They take every opportunity they can get to practice.

    You can download all the RussianPod101 lessons to your phone. Each season of podcasts will be stored as an album, so it’s easy to put on your headphones and listen to a quick lesson whenever you’ve got the time.

    Tip: delete every lesson directly after you’ve listened to it. That way you won’t have to keep track of which lesson you’re at.

    5. Have the right expectations

    On the internet you’ll find all sorts of wacky language learning systems and secret tricks that promise fluency in several months (or even weeks). While they often have some merit, most of the time the claims are not based on reality.

    The problem is when you measure your own progress to these standards. It can be very demotivating if you’ve been promised that you could learn Russian in 3 months - and you’re only having basic conversations at that time (which is actually very good).

    I’ve been seriously studying Russian for around 2.5 years now, and I’ve only recently got to the point where I can talk about a wide variety of topics in Russian. I don’t consider myself fluent, but I’m at the point where I can freely speak with native Russian speakers and understand movies without subtitles.

    That’s not to say that it will take you that long. Fluency isn’t an on/off switch. With daily practice you can already have basic conversations after several weeks of practice. You’ll get better every day and it’s this exact sense of progress that will motivate you.

    Just don’t expect to speak like a native and read Dostoyevsky after 6 months.

    Tip: talk to other people that are learning Russian (who are further than you) and ask them how long they’ve been practicing. You’ll get a good sense of how long it takes to get to a specific level.