Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Hello and welcome to Russian Survival Phrases. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Russia. So join us for Russian Survival phrases. You will be surprised at how far a little Russian will go.
There's no impression like the first. In today's lesson we'll work on leaving a first impression that will last.
In Russian, “how do you do, nice to meet you” is “kak pazhyvaete, priyatna s vami paznakomitsa”. Let`s break it down by syllable: kak pa-zhy-va-e-te, pri-yat-na s va-mi paz-na-ko-mi-tsa Now, let`s hear it once again: kak pazhyvaete, priyatna s vami paznakomitsa.
The first word “kak” means “how”. Let`s break down this word and hear it one more time: kak and kak. This is followed by “pazhyvaete”, which in English is “live”: pazhyvaete, pa-zhy-va-e-te and pazhyvaete. So, to recap here we have: “kak pazhyvaete”. Literally this means “how live”.
Let's take a look at the next “priyatna”, which means “nice”: pri-yat-na and priyatna. Then comes “s vami”, which means “with you”: s va-mi and s vami. The last part is “paznakomitsa”, which means “meet”: paz-na-ko-mi-tsa and paznakomitsa. So, altogether we have: “kak pazhyvaete, priyatna s vami paznakomitsa”. Literally this means “how you live, nice meet you”.
Now, for the next phrase we'll need a name, so I will use mine. In Russian “I am Alex” is “Menya zavut Aleks”. Let`s break it down by syllable: Me-nya za-vut A-leks. Now, let`s hear it once again: Menya zavut Aleks. The first word “menya” means “I” or “me”. Let`s break down this word and hear it one more time: me-nya and menya. This is followed by “zavut”, which in English is “called”: za-vut and zavut. So, to recap here we have: “Menya zavut…”. Literally this means “I'm called”. Let's take a look at the next “Aleks”, which means “Alex”: A-leks and Aleks. So, altogether we have: “Menya zavut Aleks”. Literally this means “I'm called Alex”.
And finally, “nice to meet you” in Russian is “priyatna s vami paznakomitsa”. Priyatna s vami paznakomitsa. Let`s break it down by syllable: pri-yat-na s va-mi paz-na-ko-mi-tsa Now, let`s hear it once again: priyatna s vami paznakomitsa.
The first word “priyatna” means “nice”. Let`s break down this word and hear it one more time: pri-yat-na and priyatna. This is followed by “s vami”, which in English is “with you”: s va-mi and s vami. And the last word is “paznakomitsa”, which in English is “to meet”: paz-na-ko-mi-tsa and paznakomitsa. So, altogether we have: “priyatna s vami paznakomitsa”. Literally this means “nice with you to meet”.
The ways people introduce themselves differ according to age and place. Young people are likely to say their first names only, exactly as the way we learned today. People over 30 tend to say both last and first names, or: “Menya zavut Ivanof Sergey”, which in English is “I am Ivanov Sergey”. Others introduce their middle name and are expecting you to call them by using their first and middle names. When you hear someone introducing himself as “I am Ivanov Sergey Vladimiravich”, then you should call the person “Sergey Vladimiravich”.
Usually people specify the way they want to be called, because sometimes to call a person by his last name is considered to be rude and creates distance between people. If you are lost, then just ask “kak vas mozhna zvat'”, which means “how can I call you”. Do not hesitate to confirm, it would be one step closer to friendship.
Between men, introductions are accompanied by handshake. It's also OK to take the hand of a woman and shake it very gently, sometimes even unnoticeably. But do not hold it for a long time as it could express an inappropriate interest. Kisses on cheeks are not good either. Such a behavior is considered as a trespass of an intimate space and can incur a negative reaction.
To close out today`s lesson we'd like for you to practice what we`d just learnt. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for saying it aloud. You'll have a few seconds before I`ll give you the answer. Udachi! That means “good luck”! Ok, here we go!
how do you do, nice to meet you……..kak pazhyvaete, priyatna s vami paznakomitsa
I am Alex……..Menya zavut Aleks.
Nice to meet you…...Priyatna s vami paznakomitsa
Alright, that's going to do for today. See you tomorrow, which in Russian is da zaftra!

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi! I've been listening to the free 15 lessons on my ipod and I think they are wonderful. I still get stuck on some of the pronunciation because I don't know the Russian Alphabet but Im getting it. My Russian friends are a little impressed for me trying to learn their language. So its nice to say a few words to them and get a response. All thanks to you! I don't think I will go to Russia any time soon, but Im around Russians because the Industry I am in here in California. It is Heating and Air Condition plus appliances. Russians are really nice, and love Money. So here I am, next to them doing the same thing to get that money! Lol. But these lessons are not hitting the terms I would like to say in Russian while in front of a customer. For instance, " Serge, I need help" or How much should I charge her/him? Can you please help? I would greatly appreciate it. Spasiba, Carlos- U.S.M.C. Sgt

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RussianPod101.com
Thursday at 1:47 am
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Hello Mary Rollis,


Russian speakers will definitely understand, even if your [жи] will not sound natural. 😄


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

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Mary Rollis
Saturday at 4:56 am
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I have a general pronunciation question. How well would a Russian native speaker understand me IF I prounounced поживаете using a 'long I' sound for the character и instead of the way it's prounounced by the speaker in this dialogue, as sort of an 'uh' sound? It's probably a stupid question, but my accent is never going to be that accurate so I just need to make myself understood, IF my husband and I ever get around to a cruise through western Russia! Thanks.

Mary