Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Katyusha: Hello everyone [привет] and welcome to Russian weekly words and my name is Katyusha. We are going to start today with a new topic which is going to be... “in your wallet”. [Что у тебя в кошельке? - Shto u tebya f kashel`ke?] - “What’s in your wallet?”.
If you are a businessman or businesswoman, you probably have a [визитная карточка - vizitnaya kartachka] - “business card”. [визитная карточка - vizitnaya kartachka]. It’s strange it kind of sounds like visiting, right? Like if you want to visit me, you have to use [визитная карточка - vizitnaya kartachka] I guess. “Give me your business card” - [Дайте мне свою визитную карточку. - Dayte mne svayu vizitnuyu kartachku.] Oh my god, it sounds so long.
Next word is very useful. I am sure most of you had it in your wallet. So it’s [кредитная карточка - kreditnaya kartachka] - it’s a “credit card” of course. “I am going to go shopping and use my credit card”. - [Сегодня я пойду по магазинам и использую кредитную карточку. - Sevodnya ya paydu pa magazinam i ispol'zuyu kreditnuyu kartachku.]. “Where is my credit card?” - [Где моя кредитка? - Gde maya kreditka?].
Next word is [купон - kupon] which is “coupon”, right. So I don’t have many in my wallet. To be honest, I have none but if you want to have like some kind of discount in the restaurant or café, you can always use coupon. “Can I use my coupon?” - [Можно я использую купон? - Mozhna ya ispol'zuyu kupon?].
Next word is [наличные деньги - nalichnyye den'gi] and in English, it’s just “cash”. [наличные деньги - nalichnyye den'gi]. [Деньги - den`gi] is “money” but to be honest, we usually say [наличка - nalichka] to make it shorter. [Я плачу наличкой. - Ya plachu nalichkay.] - “I pay cash”. We can just put it in the pocket.
Next one is [читательский билет - chitatel'skiy bilet]. How many of you in your wallet have a library card. Sorry, I am laughing. Maybe you do have it. Of course if you go to library, you need a [читательский билет - chitatel'skiy bilet] to read. [Читать - chitat`] is “read”. [Сегодня я иду в библиотеку и мне нужен читательский билет. - Sevodnya ya idu v biblioteku i mne nuzhen chitatel'skiy bilet.] - “Tomorrow I am going to library. So I need my library card.” Also I just find out that this is the end of our word session for today but I am sure some of you have also one thing in your wallet which could be useful. Okay so it was nice talking to you and I hope to see you in our next Russian weekly words session with me bye [Пока-пока - paka-paka]

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RussianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Which word do you like the most?

RussianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:33 AM
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Здравствуйте Ron in Houston,


Thank you so much for your positive message! 😇❤️️

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Всего наилучшего,

Левенте

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Ron in Houston
Tuesday at 09:16 AM
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My favorite - наличные деньги. Thanks to Katya for telling us the short version. My Russian was too monosyllabic. People would ask how I was going to pay and I would just say "money" or "card."


Now I will be prepared. 👍👍

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Monday at 05:16 AM
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Здравствуйте robert groulx,


Спасибо for posting. We are very happy to have you here. Let us know if you have any questions.


Всего наилучшего,

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robert groulx
Monday at 12:50 AM
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thank you for the lesson transcript


favorite phrase it [наличные деньги - nalichnyye den'gi


robert

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Sunday at 06:09 PM
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Hello Кэмми,


Thank you for your comment ?


Elena

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Кэмми
Sunday at 08:04 PM
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Еще кое-что полезное в кошелке? Как ты знала Катюша )

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Wednesday at 08:54 AM
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Hello Richard Mitchell,

Thank you for your comment :smile:

Elena

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Richard Mitchell
Saturday at 06:15 AM
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Regarding Katyusha's comment about the Russian term "business card" (визитная карточка), which I will have to say is not really such a strange term. In English there is a term for something very similar, which was known as a "calling card." In English, we can also say, "Thank You for calling on us last week!" meaning that we were happy you visited us. The calling card was used by people when they visited someone, such as a new neighbor, or a neighbor one had not met before, or it was also something that was left with the host or hostess when you attended a party, dinner, or luncheon at someone's home. The calling card was not as "formal" as a business card, but it would have the husband's and/or wife's first and last names, with their address and telephone number. A host or hostess may have even had a large silver bowl in the foyer of the home to "receive" the calling cards (that is, one would drop their calling card in the bowl after greeting the host/hostess). This whole sequence of events occurred in more gentile times, usually in upper scale homes in the American Northeast or in the South. The commanding officer of my Army unit (he was a general), who was from Virginia, always expected visitors to leave a calling card when attending any type of function at his home. Also, being the perfect host, gentleman, etc., you would usually receive a "thank you" note or card (sent by his wife) for attending (the luncheon, dinner, etc.). A very gracious and attentive host, to say the least! (The time frame I'm referencing here is 50+ years ago!)