Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Anna: [Привет Ханой! Меня зовут Анна.]
Erik: Erik here. Newbie series, season 1, lesson 16, Review of Lessons 13 through 15.
Anna: Hello everyone. I am Anna and welcome to russianpod101.com
Erik: With us, you will learn to speak Russian with fun and effective lessons.
Anna: We also provide you with cultural insights
Erik: : And tips you won’t find in a textbook and in this lesson, you will review the grammar points and vocabulary covered in lessons 13 through 15.
Anna:This conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Erik: And the conversation is between work colleagues
Anna: [Елена Петровна]
Erik: And [Николай Иванович]
Anna:So the speakers are colleagues.
Erik: Therefore they will be speaking formal Russian. I will be playing [Николай Иванович]
Anna: And I will be playing [Елена Петровна]
Erik: Okay here we go.
DIALOGUE
Елена Петровна: А вот и наше шампанское.
(Elena Petrovna: A vot i nashe vino.)
Николай Иванович: Давайте выпьем. За нас!
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Davaite vyp’em. Za nas!)
Елена Петровна: За удачу!
(Elena Petrovna: Za udachu!)
Николай Иванович: Елена, давайте потанцуем?
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Elena, davaite potantsuem?)
Елена Петровна: Нет, Никoлай, уже поздно. Мне пора домой.
(Elena Petrovna: Net, Nikolai, uzhe pozdno.)
Николай Иванович: Ещё же рано. Вы устали?
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Eshchy che rano. Vy ustali? )
Елена Петровна: Да, я хочу домой.
(Elena Petrovna: Da, ya hochu domoi.)
Николай Иванович: Жалко. Вас проводить?
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Zhalko. Vas provodit’?)
Erik: One time slowly.
Anna: Ещё раз, медленнее.
Елена Петровна: А вот и наше шампанское.
(Elena Petrovna: A vot i nashe vino.)
Николай Иванович: Давайте выпьем. За нас!
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Davaite vyp’em. Za nas!)
Елена Петровна: За удачу!
(Elena Petrovna: Za udachu!)
Николай Иванович: Елена, давайте потанцуем?
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Elena, davaite potantsuem?)
Елена Петровна: Нет, Никoлай, уже поздно. Мне пора домой.
(Elena Petrovna: Net, Nikolai, uzhe pozdno.)
Николай Иванович: Ещё же рано. Вы устали?
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Eshchy che rano. Vy ustali? )
Елена Петровна: Да, я хочу домой.
(Elena Petrovna: Da, ya hochu domoi.)
Николай Иванович: Жалко. Вас проводить?
(Nikolai Ivanovich: Zhalko. Vas provodit’?)
Erik: One time natural native speed with the translation.
Anna: Ещё раз с переводом.
Anna: А вот и наше шампанское.
Erik: Here is our champagne.
Anna: [Давайте выпьем. За нас!]
Erik: Let’s drink to us.
Anna: За удачу!
Erik: To good luck.
Anna: Елена, давайте потанцуем?
Erik: Elena let’s dance.
Anna: Нет, Никoлай, уже поздно. Мне пора домой.
Erik: No Nikolai it’s late. I have to go home.
Anna: Ещё же рано. Вы устали?
Erik: It’s still early. Are you tired?
Anna: Да, я хочу домой.
Erik: Yes I want to go home.
Anna: Жалко. Вас проводить?
Erik: Ah that’s sad. So you want me to see you off.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Erik: So Anna, I am a little bit curious at the end of the dialogue if Nikolai’s proposal to Elena to see her off…
Anna: Aaha.
Erik: Is there some hidden meaning?
Anna: Oh it’s so difficult to say. It might have and it might not. It all depends on the relationships. In Russia, men can see their friends or colleagues off as a matter of courtesy or to make sure they get home safe.
Erik: So it could mean, see you off to the taxi.
Anna: Yes it doesn’t mean that he has to take her home.
Erik: Okay so it’s just – he is just being polite.
Anna: Yes.
Erik: Hopefully.
Anna: Oh well! They are being polite because they are using the formal pronoun you right?
Erik: Ah [вы]
Anna: Yes exactly. Then they are addressing each other informally.
Erik: Okay. So Anna, I noticed that they were not using their patronymic or [отчество]
Anna: Yeah.
Erik: They just called each other by their first names. So even though, they are work colleagues, is this common?
Anna: Actually Erik, it all depends on the company and on the relationships of the people but it’s safer to start first as a patronymic name and then switch to shorter version if you think it’s appropriate.
Erik: Okay so obviously in this case, they felt comfortable just calling each other by their first name.
Anna: Yes and they are kind of in the restaurant. So it’s more informal setting.
VOCAB LIST
Erik: Okay. Okay let’s take a closer look at the vocabulary and phrases for this lesson. Our first word is
Anna: [шампанское]
Erik: Champagne.
Anna: [шампанское]
Erik: Next
Anna: [за удачу]
Erik: To good luck or fortune.
Anna: [за удачу]
Erik: Next
Anna: [жалко]
Erik: It’s a pity, it’s sad.
Anna: [жалко]
Erik: Next
Anna: [проводить]
Erik: To see off, to see someone off.
Anna:[проводить]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Erik: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Anna: Our first phrase is [жалко] which translates it’s sad, it’s a pity.
Erik: So you would use this phrase when you want to express regret or disappointment.
Anna: Yeah especially when your offer or proposal is rejected like in our example.
Erik: This word [жалко] is pretty common. I hear it a lot.
Anna: Yeah.
Erik: So I’ve also heard [мне жалко]
Anna:Yes sometimes we use [мне жалко]. I can say [Мне жалко тебя Эрик] I am so sorry for you Erik.
Erik: Oh no! I hope I don’t hear this.
Anna: Yeah.
Erik: Or there is a more formal version.
Anna: Yes. The more formal version is [жаль, мне жаль]
Erik: Can you give an example Anna when you would use [мне жаль]
Anna: Actually it’s a nice way to express your condolences when you hear that someone has died.
Erik: Okay Anna, good to know. Thank you. So Anna, in our lesson, we have the word for Champagne which is
Anna: [шампанское]
Erik: Can we just go over a few common alcoholic drinks.
Anna: Okay so probably the most common is Vodka
Erik: Or when I went to Russia, beer was more common. I saw people drinking beer more than Vodka.
Anna: Oh well. Probably beer is more common among young people.
Erik: So how would you say beer?
Anna: [пиво]
Erik: [пишо]
Anna: And then we have wine which is [вино]
Erik: This is a vocabulary word from our previous lesson.
Anna: Exactly.
Erik: Can we hear those one more time.
Anna: Okay [шампанское]
Erik: Champagne.
Anna:[вино]
Erik: Wine.
Anna:[водка]
Erik: Vodka.
Anna: [пиво]
Erik: And beer.

Lesson focus

Erik: Now let’s look at the grammar for this lesson.
Anna: We covered the biggest part of our grammar points in the previous lessons but let’s talk a little bit about the difference of the phrases [давай] and [давайте]
Erik: So they both mean let’s but you would use the first one [давай] with who Anna?
Anna: With your friend.
Erik: And the second one [давайте]
Anna: Right.
Erik: With?
Anna: Two or more people or with just one elder person.
Erik: Okay so even if it’s two friends, you would use [давайте]
Anna: Exactly.
Erik: So in this case, it’s not a formal-informal, it’s a pleural-nonpleural
Anna: Yes.
Erik: Okay good to know.
Anna: Also Erik, it is good to know that this particle [те] is used not only with the [давай] word but with others as well. For example, the phrase [пойдём] let’s go
Erik: You can add [те] on to that, can you Anna.
Anna: Yes and this would mean that you are talking to your friends more than one or just one elder person.
Erik: Okay and how would you say that?
Anna: [пойдёмте]
Erik: [пойдёмте] So [пойдём] means let’s go
Anna: And [пойдёмте] means let’s go.
Erik: And [пойдёмте] means let’s go also but to – if you are talking to a group of people like you said.
Anna: Yes.
Erik: Or if you want to show your respect.
Anna: Exactly.
Erik: Good to know Anna.
Anna: Okay Erik, I would like to talk about one more grammar point for this lesson.
Erik: Okay Anna.
Anna:And that’s past tense dance in Russian.
Erik: This one is a lot easier than any other tense I think?
Anna: Yes. In our dialogue, [Николай Иванович] asks [Елена Николаевна]. [Вы устали?] using the past tense.
Erik: Are you tired even though it translates into English, are you tired [устал] is in the past tense right?
Anna: Exactly.
Erik: But there is [устали] Can you explain the difference between [устал, устаьли] and [устала]
Anna: Yes to make the past tense Russian, you would usually use the ending L [л] instead of the verbs infinitive ending [ть] and in case of masculine nouns, you would just go with this [л] ending. For feminine nouns, you would use ending [ла] and for pleural or formal you would use ending [ли]
Erik: So let’s have the same example with [я устал]
Anna: So for you Erik, you would say
Erik: [я устал]
Anna: Yeah and I would say [я устала] and then together….
Erik: You would say [мы]
Anna: [устали]
Erik: [устали] Okay.
Anna: I hope [ты не устал] Erik.
Erik: [Я не устал] Anna.
Anna: That’s good.

Outro

Erik: And we hope our listeners are not [устали]
Anna: [не устали] Yeah.
Erik: So thanks for joining us today.
Anna:Thank you and if you are not too tired, please stop by and leave us a comment.
Erik: Until next time
Anna: [Пока, пока!]

22 Comments

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RussianPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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RussianPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 8:55 pm
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Hello Fernando,


"права" means "driver's license". But "to drive" is "водить".


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Fernando
Friday at 1:30 am
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I have a question, the verb проводить is the same "to drive"?

Прова is drive license, right?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 4:07 pm
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Hello Thaddeus,


Thank you for your positive comment 😄


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

RussianPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 12:56 pm
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Hi Thaddeus,


Thanks for your feedback! We'll definitely see what we can do 😉.


Cheers,


Khanh.

Team RussianPod101.com

Thaddeus
Wednesday at 9:14 am
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Absolutely love this program. This combined with some grammar books, online tutoring = optimal learning. Thanks for this!???

Jason
Saturday at 1:40 pm
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hmmm...why is there no option to add this to the dashboard? :disappointed:

RussianPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 10:10 am
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Hi Yixin,


That's right. Although other series have 25 lessons, this newbie series has 16 lessons at the total. Thank you for asking!


Jae

Team RussianPod101.com

Yixin
Saturday at 8:15 pm
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Is this the last lesson of the series instead of the standard 25-lesson series?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:39 am
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Hello Jim Awofadeju,


Great to know that! I hope our lessons will help you review your Russian and take it to another level:smile: Wish you all the luck:cool:


If you ever have any questions, we'd be happy to help you.


Cheers,

Neha

Team RussianPod101.com

Jim Awofadeju
Friday at 3:00 pm
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I'm really enjoying these Russian lessons you're offering. I'm very familiar with Russian already. I'm just looking for extra resources to aid my study. This is certainly a good resource. I've been able to learn some colloquial Russian and the meaning of certain expressions. I want my study of Russian to be life-long. It's such a unique and useful language. Keep up the good work!