Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Oksana: [Здравствуйте]
Eddie: Eddy here! Lower Intermediate Series Season 1 Lesson 8.
Oksana: [Всем привет!]
Eddie: Welcome to the third lesson of our hospital story.
Oksana: Last time, our guy who suffered from insomnia left with a bunch of advice from the doctor, but took it rather skeptically.
Eddie: Right! The doctor seeing how young the guy was, just tried to alter his lifestyle a little and put him on a healthier path.
Oksana: But the guy chose the easy way, he asked for pills.
Eddie: Let’s listen to the conversation and find out where the medicating himself did the guy any good.
DIALOGUE
Eddie: Здравствуйте, это я опять.
Oksana: Ну, как, стали спать лучше?
Eddie: Ну... Я прихожу домой уставший и голодный, я не могу не есть много и не смотреть телевизор, это меня расслабляет...
Oksana: Но поймите, Ваш мозг устаёт за день, а тело – нет, этот дисбаланс и даёт Вам бессонницу. Вечерние прогулки или лёгкие пробежки должны Вам помочь!
Eddie: Может, всё-таки таблетки?...
Eddie: Once again, more slowly.
Oksana: Еще раз, медленнее.
Eddie: Здравствуйте, это я опять.
Oksana: Ну, как, стали спать лучше?
Eddie: Ну... Я прихожу домой уставший и голодный, я не могу не есть много и не смотреть телевизор, это меня расслабляет...
Oksana: Но поймите, Ваш мозг устаёт за день, а тело – нет, этот дисбаланс и даёт Вам бессонницу. Вечерние прогулки или лёгкие пробежки должны Вам помочь!
Eddie: Может, всё-таки таблетки?...
Eddie: One time, with translation.
Oksana: Еще раз, с переводом.
Oksana: Здравствуйте, это я опять.
Eddie: Hello, it's me again.
Oksana: Ну, как, стали спать лучше?
Eddie: So, are you sleeping better now?
Oksana: Ну... Я прихожу домой уставший и голодный, я не могу не есть много и не смотреть телевизор, это меня расслабляет…
Eddie: Well...I come home tired and hungry, I can't not eat a lot and not watch TV, it relaxes me..
Oksana: Но поймите, Ваш мозг устаёт за день, а тело – нет, этот дисбаланс и даёт Вам бессонницу. Вечерние прогулки или лёгкие пробежки должны Вам помочь!
Eddie: But you should understand, your brain gets tired during the day but your body doesn't, and this imbalance gives you insomnia. Evening walks or light jogs should help you!
Oksana: Может, всё-таки таблетки?...
Eddie: Maybe we'll try pills after all?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Oksana: So, the guy is consciously and subconsciously denying any kind of help, except for medical kind. He finds excuses why he can’t do anything about his problem himself.
Eddie: But, you must agree, when a guy comes at home at 10 pm, worn out and starving, he won’t go the gym right away.
Oksana: I know, but he could start walking a couple of stops instead of riding a bus. And everything takes some effort, even denying yourself a movie before sleep. Your mind might protest at first, but it will think you forgot lately.
Eddie: Ok, you’re not a therapist, Roxana, so let’s leave this thing to the doctor. And our business is to teach the listeners some Russian.
Oksana: Yes, let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Eddie: The first word we’ll look at is?
Oksana: [опять]
Eddie: “Again”
Oksana: [опять]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [стать]
Eddie: “To become”, “start doing”
Oksana: [стать]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [уставший]
Eddie: “Tired”
Oksana: [уставший]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [голодный]
Eddie: “Hungry”
Oksana: [голодный]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [расслаблять]
Eddie: “To relax”, “to make someone feel relaxed”
Oksana: [расслаблять]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [мозг]
Eddie: “Brain”
Oksana: [мозг]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [тело]
Eddie: “Body”
Oksana: [тело]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [дисбаланс]
Eddie: “Imbalance”
Oksana: [дисбаланс]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [дать]
Eddie: “To give”
Oksana: [дать]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [пробежка]
Eddie: “A jog”, “a run”
Oksana: [пробежка]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [помочь]
Eddie: “To help”
Oksana: [помочь]
Eddie: Next?
Oksana: [все-таки]
Eddie: “However”, “still”, “after all”
Oksana: [все-таки]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: Ok, now let’s take a close look into the vocabulary. The first word is?
Oksana: [опять]. It’s a simple word which means “again”. There is another word for “again” you might have come across - [снова]. These word are almost always interchangeable. The next word is [стать].
Eddie: [Стать] is one of the most useful words remember. It has several meanings and all of them are equally frequently used. Here are some of them.
Oksana: The first meaning is “to become”. For example, [Он стал учителем].
Eddie: “He became a teacher.”
Oksana: [Она стала великой актрисой]
Eddie: “She became a great actress.”
Oksana: The second meaning is “to start”, “to start doing something”. For instance, [Она стала заниматься спортом].
Eddie: “She started to do sports.”
Oksana: [Он стал много пить после того, как его уволили]
Eddie: “He started drinking a lot after he was fired.”
Oksana: And the last, rather sad meaning of the word [стать] is the polite way of saying “to pass away”. Here’s an example: [Ее не стало в прошлом году].
Eddie: “She passed away last year.” The next two words we should learn together as even in real life they are very often used together. “Tired” and “hungry”.
Oksana: [голодный и уставший]. We’re going to talk about adjectives a bit more in our grammar part. The next word is [расслаблять].
Eddie: Which means “to relax”, but not yourself. If you say [расслаюблять] pick up, if you say [расслаблять] it’s not you who’s relaxing. It’s either someone or something relaxing you.
Oksana: Like [Телевизор меня расслабляет] - “The TV relaxes me.”
Eddie: Or, you make somebody relax.
Oksana: For example, [Я расслабляю его массажем] - “I relax him with a massage.”
Eddie: And, if you’re talking about yourself, for example, “I’m relaxing at home.” you should add the ending [-ся] to the word pick up. You should add the ending [-ся] to the word [расслаблять].
Oksana: Right! [-ся] indicates that the action is performed on yourself, so “I’m relaxing at home.” will sound as [Я расслабляюсь дома]. The next two words we should also remember in pair are [мозг] and [тело].
Eddie: Yes, it’s always better to remember the words from the same category together. So, [мозг] and [тело] mean “brain” and “body”, respectively. Next we have?
Oksana: [дисбаланс]
Eddie: It differs from its English equivalent only and one letter, we say “imbalanced” and Russian says [дисбаланс]. Pretty easy! What’s the next word?
Oksana: The word [дать] - “to give”.
Eddie: And, just like in English, this word “to give” can be used both when something concrete and specific is given. And some more abstract things like “tiredness” or “pain”. In our dialogue, the imbalance of tired mind and energetic body [даёт] insomnia to the guy. The next word is pretty easy.
Oksana: [Пробежка] which means “a short jog” or “a run”. We know the word [прогулка] already, which is “a walk”, “a stroll”.
Eddie: These are words from the same category which are better remembered in pairs. The next word is?
Oksana: [Помочь]
Eddie: Which means “to help”.
Oksana: Like [помочь другу] - “to help a friend”. And the last word to look at is [все-таки].
Eddie: That’s a good one. It means “still”, “after all”. However, this word underlines the final decision whether in a statement or in a question. It’s used very frequently in all these meanings in Russian. Let’s look at the examples.
Oksana: [Может, все-таки поедем?]
Eddie: “Maybe we will still go.”, “Maybe we can still go.”
Oksana: [Все-таки ты не прав.]
Eddie: “Still you’re wrong.”
Oksana: [Он сказал, что его не интересует эта вечеринка, но все-таки пришел.]
Eddie: “He said he had no interest in this party, however he came.”
Oksana: [Ты не можешь опаздывать, ты же все-таки директор.]
Eddie: “You can’t be late! You’re a director, after all!”. Ok, I guess everything is clear with the words. Now, it’s time to take a look into the grammar for this lesson.

Lesson focus

Oksana: Today we’ll take a short break from the grammar cases and switch our focus to the words we use to describe people or events: the adjectives.
Eddie: In today’s lesson, we come across four adjectives.
Oksana: [голодный]
Eddie: “Hungry”
Oksana: [вечерние]
Eddie: “Evening”
Oksana: [легкие]
Eddie: “Light”
Oksana: [уставший]
Eddie: “Tired”. You can easily guess the gender and number of these adjectives from their endings. Roxana, let’s remind everyone of the rules Russian adjectives live by.
Oksana: Ok, so, if an adjective has an ending [-ый] or [-ий] like in [белый] and [синий] - “white” and “blue”, it means it has masculine gender. If an adjective ends in [-ая], [-яя] it means we’re dealing with feminine form of it, like [белая],[синяя].
Eddie: The neuter form of an adjective usually has the endings [-ое] or [-ее]. Like in the words [белое] and [синее]. And plurals end in [-ые] or [-ие].
Oksana: Like [белые, синие].
Eddie: The adjectives “white” and “blue” are adjectives by origin, they not derive from any other part of speech.
Oksana: The adjectives [голодный] and [легкий] - “hungry” and “light”, for example.
Eddie: But there are adjectives in Russian that come from nouns or verbs.
Oksana: So are the adjectives [голодный] and [легкий] - “hungry” and “light”, for example.
Eddie: However, there are adjectives in Russian that come from nouns or verbs.
Oksana: Like the word [вечерний] in our lesson , came from the word [вечер] - “evening”.
Eddie: The thing is, in English such adjectives are no different from the nouns and we can only say that they’re adjectives from the context. “Beautiful evening”, the word “evening” is a noun here which is modified by the word “beautiful”. “Evening walk”, the word “evening” is an adjective here, which modifies the word “walk”.
Oksana: In Russian it doesn’t work this way. In Russian, nouns and verbs must be converted to adjectives before they can modify nouns.
Eddie: In English, for example one may say “evening walk”, but in Russian the word [вечер] - “evening” must first be converted to an adjective [вечерний] before this phrase is possible: [вечерняя прогулка].
Oksana: Here are some more examples. “City transport” - [городской транспорт]. We took the word [город] - “city” and turned it into an adjective [городской]. Another example is “computer program” - [компьютерная программа]. We took the word [компьютер] - “computer” and changed it into an adjective [компьютерная].
Eddie: These are adjectives from nouns. But there are also adjectives in Russian that come from verbs. They’re called participles and express the concept of “which”, like in the sentence “The dog which came into the room.” The phrase “which came” can be expressed with just one word in Russian.
Oksana: In the dialogue we have the word [уставший] - “tired” or “which is tired”, literally. This word came from the verb [устать] - “to get tired”. In our lesson, it happens to be in the Past Tense, so we should call it the Past Participle.
Eddie: So, how do we form this Past Participle?
Oksana: With just one easy ending [-вший]. I’ll give you some examples the verbs that we’re supposed to convert into the adjectives or participles. [Устать] - “to get tired”. We take the ending [-ть] and change it into [-вший]. What do we get? We get [уставший] which we can translate as “tired”. Another verb is [сделать] - “to do”, changing it into [сделавший] we get the word that we can translate as “which did”. [человек, сделавший это] - “a person who did it”. And the last example, [написать] - “to write”. After applying the ending [-вший] we have a new word [написавший], literally “which wrote” or “who wrote”. For example, [человек, написавший эту книгу] - “A man who wrote this book.”
Eddie: So, as we can see, these words can hardly be called adjectives in English, but in Russian they can be referred to as adjectives, because they have the same grammatical endings as simple adjectives.
Oksana: [-ый, -ий, -ой] for masculine, [-ая, - яя] for feminine and so on.
Eddie: The important thing to remember is that adjectives, whatever their origin, must agree with the noun they modify. They do this with the endings which are associated with the same cases and genders that nouns reflect in their endings.
Oksana: In the phrase [городской транспорт] - “city transport”, [транспорт] is masculine, therefore [городской] should also be masculine. [Уставшая женщина] - “tired woman”, [женщина] is feminine here, it means that [уставшая] - “tired woman”, [женщина] is feminine, it means that [уставшая] should also be feminine.

Outro

Eddie: That just about does it for today. [Пока]
Oksana: [Счастливо!]

11 Comments

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RussianPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Are you ready to give up your bad habits?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 5:55 pm
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Hello Roma,


Thank you for your feedback! :smile:


Elena


Team RussianPod101.com

Roma
Monday at 7:22 pm
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Great lesson! But Eddie seems a little rude. Then again I don't understand British humor. But besides the grammar and dialogue, iI like to feel like the hosts are getting along. Lol

RussianPod101.comVerified
Monday at 8:35 pm
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Hello Alex,


You are right.


Thank you for letting us know.


Elena


Team RussianPod101.com

Alex
Sunday at 6:54 pm
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I think there is a little mistake in the lesson materials: The native speaker says помочь instead of помощь.

RussianPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 1:50 pm
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Hi Yixin.


Thank you for posting!

The transcript is available under Download PDFs, right after the lesson notes [over the title].

Let us know if you need help finding it.


Sincerely,

Laura

Team RussianPod101.com

Yixin
Thursday at 6:57 pm
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May I have the audio transcript for this lesson? Thanks.

RussianPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 10:00 am
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Hi Paul,


Thank you for posting.

If you click on the icon, you will be able to read a short introduction.

Спасибо,


Ofelia

Team RussianPod101.com

Paul
Sunday at 2:04 pm
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Where is this guy from? My wife reckons from a northern European country?

Svetlana
Wednesday at 1:51 pm
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Hi Jack,

Thanx for comment.

Both sentences,“это я опять” and “это опять я”, are grammatically correct. The words'order in Russian sentence is very flexible. It might alter according to the particular information speaker wants to communicate and emphasize. In the first sentence, speaker wants to specify himself being in the doctors' cabinet "Here I'M again", while in the second sentence he is emphasizing the frequencies of his visits "and AGAIN me".

let me give you another example:

Мария едет в Москву. - Maria goes to Moscow.

В Москву едет Мария. – It is Maria who goes to Moscow.

Please compare these two sentences and you will understand that speaker communicates two different messages by using the same words. Interesting huh?

Hope it would help.

jack
Tuesday at 5:41 pm
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вдиалоге звучит "это я опять" может лучше сказать "это опять я"??