Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eddie: Eddie here. Lower Intermediate Series Season 1, Lesson 5. Which is giving you more pain in Russia.
Oksana: [Здравствуйте]
Eddie: Hello everyone and welcome to the final lesson of our short story about a sister and brother who’s relationship is challenged by a summer camp they were thrown in together.
Oksana: It sounded like an introduction to some creepy reality show. Everything here is much easier. A little brother and big sister are learning to get along together while being apart from their parents.
Eddie: Ok, let’s put it that way. Anyway, it’s the last episode in this short season and four other seasons are about to come out.
Oksana: Let’s listen to the dialogue and find out what the story about took kids with, how the conflict gets solved.
DIALOGUE
Eddie: Вика, извини меня, не злись, пожалуйста…
Oksana: Я с тобой не разговариваю. Сиди и читай свои комиксы.
Eddie: Ну пожалуйста, прости меня, я больше так не буду, обещаю.
Oksana: Что не будешь?
Eddie: Убегать, плохо себя вести…
Oksana: Ладно. Но я тебя предупреждаю, ещё одна выходка – и мы едем домой!
Eddie: Once again, more slowly
Oksana: Еще раз, медленнее.
Eddie: Вика, извини меня, не злись, пожалуйста…
Oksana: Я с тобой не разговариваю. Сиди и читай свои комиксы.
Eddie: Ну пожалуйста, прости меня, я больше так не буду, обещаю.
Oksana: Что не будешь?
Eddie: Убегать, плохо себя вести…
Oksana: Ладно. Но я тебя предупреждаю, ещё одна выходка – и мы едем домой!
Eddie: Once again, with a translation.
Oksana: Еще раз, с переводом. Вика, извини меня, не злись, пожалуйста…
Eddie: Vika, I'm sorry, don't be mad, please…
Oksana: Я с тобой не разговариваю. Сиди и читай свои комиксы.
Eddie: I'm not talking to you. Sit and read your comic book.
Oksana: Ну пожалуйста, прости меня, я больше так не буду, обещаю.
Eddie: Please, forgive me, It won't happen again, I promise.
Oksana: Что не будешь?
Eddie: You won't do what?
Oksana: Убегать, плохо себя вести…
Eddie: Run away…misbehave…
Oksana: Ладно. Но я тебя предупреждаю, ещё одна выходка – и мы едем домой!
Eddie: Okay, but I'm warning you, just one more prank and we're going home!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eddie: Ok, so Egor asks for forgiveness because there’s no way he can play around without it. And Vica’s pretty annoyed with him, but she doesn’t hold a grudge for long.
Oksana: I'm sure this will happen another hundred times. Egor acts up, Vica gets mad, Igor asks for forgiveness, Vica gives it to him.
Eddie: Seems like a natural cycle of relationship to me. So shall we take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson? Ok, the first word we’ll look at is…
VOCAB LIST
Oksana: [Злиться]
Eddie: To be mad, to be angry.
Oksana: [Злиться]
Eddie: And next.
Oksana: [Разговаривать]
Eddie: To speak, talk to, communicate.
Oksana: [Разговаривать]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Комиксы]
Eddie: Comic books.
Oksana: [Комиксы]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Простить]
Eddie: To forgive.
Oksana: [Простить]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Обещать]
Eddie: To promise.
Oksana: [Обещать]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Убегать]
Eddie: To run away.
Oksana: [Убегать]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Вести себя]
Eddie: To behave.
Oksana: [Вести себя]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Ладно]
Eddie: Ok, well, fine.
Oksana: [Ладно]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Предупреждать]
Eddie: To warn.
Oksana: [Предупреждать]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Выходка]
Eddie: Prank.
Oksana: [Выходка]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Oksana: The first word is [злиться].
Eddie: “To be angry, mad.” This is a reflexive verb which means the person is mad himself, probably at someone, but he’s not making anyone angry. Usually, this verb comes with the preposition [на], “on”, which can be translated as “at” into English.
Oksana: For example, [Он до сих пор злится на меня].
Eddie: He’s still mad at me. He’s still angry with me.
Oksana: If you drop the reflexive part [ся], you will get a verb in the meaning of “to make someone mad, angry” [злить] . For example, [Не зли собаку].
Eddie: “Don’t make the dog angry.” The next word is…
Oksana: [Разговаривать]
Eddie: This means “to talk” but “to talk” in general, “to have conversations”, “to talk to”.
Oksana: Like in a sentence [Я с тобой не разговариваю]. “I'm not talking to you”. Not only right now but also in general.
Eddie: So Vica is not talking to Egor, but tells him to sit quietly and read his…
Oksana: [Комиксы]. You just have to add one letter, [ы], to the end of the English “comics” and you’ll get “comic books” in Russian. The next word is [простить].
Eddie: Means “to forgive”. It can also be used in the meaning of “excuse me” as an addressing word.
Oksana: [Простите, Вы не подскажете...]
Eddie: Yes. “Excuse me, could you please tell me…” Or you can use it when you step on someone’s foot, for example. The word [простите] would be enough for an apology. Next word is…
Oksana: [Обещать] means “to promise”. Usually, when you give a promise to someone you say [Я обещаю, что..], “I promise that…” and then whatever you want to promise.
Eddie: We should also mention how this word sounds in the past tense because the phrases like “you promised” or “she promised” are quite common.
Oksana: Well, as we know, when putting the verbs into the past tense, we should pay attention on genders. So if I say “she promised”, I’d say [Она обещала]. If it’s a “he”, then I should say [Он обещал].
Eddie: And if it’s a “you” all I have to do is take a close look at the person, figure out whether it’s a guy or a girl and the use one of the forms mentioned above.
Oksana: Yes. Next we have a word for “ran away” which is [убегать].
Eddie: In the previous lesson we learned some prefixes that we can add to the verbs of motion to give them a direction. These verbs are applicable to all verbs of motion, not just the verbs of the meaning “to go”. Here we have the verb [бегать], which simply means “to run”. By adding a prefix [у], we get a totally new meaning of this word, “to run away”.
Oksana: Right, we can add any of the prefixes we learned in the previous lesson. For example, add [вы] and you’ll get [выбегать] which means “to run out”.
Eddie: Right. You can play with prefixes and verbs when you have a free moment, but now the next phrase please.
Oksana: [Вести себя]
Eddie: Literally it means “lead yourself” and is translated as “behave”. Switching the words around doesn’t affect the meaning and in order to say “to behave well” or “to behave badly” you should just add the adverbs [хорошо] and [плохо] before the phrase.
Oksana: [Хорошо себя вести. Плохо себя вести]
Eddie: The next verb is very popular in colloquial Russian.
Oksana: [Ладно]
Eddie: It’s a word of agreement, to do something or, as in our case, believing something. The word doesn’t sound very enthusiastic, even expresses a little unwillingness in agreement, kind of like a forced agreement, like “fine, I’ll do it” or “fine, I believe you, whatever”.
Oksana: Well, it also depends on the intonation you say it with. You can make it sound more negative or just like a normal “ok”. The next word is [предупреждать].
Eddie: “To warn”. There’s nothing complicated about this word, except for its length. In the dialogue, we had it in the phrase “I'm warning you”.
Oksana: [Я тебя предупреждаю.]
Eddie: But I think we should also give you the noun version of this word because if you go to Russia you’ll bump into the sign “warning” all the time. Yes, there’s a lot they want to warn you about there. So the word for “warning” is…
Oksana: [Предупреждение]
Eddie: And the last word we have for this lesson is…
Oksana: [Выходка]
Eddie: “A prank”, “a mischievous trick/joke”, not always funny and not always harmless. Ok, we’re done with the vocabulary for this lesson. Now let’s take a look at the grammar.
LESSON FOCUS
Oksana: Today we’ll focus on the imperatives, mostly how to form them. In our lesson, we could hear such examples of the imperatives as [сиди, читай].
Eddie: The imperative forms of verbs used to make commands or requests is closely connected to the present tense conjugation pattern of the verb. As we usually give the commands to the second person, singular or plural polite “you”, we should first put the verbs into the present tense, second person.
Oksana: [Сидеть - сидишь] “to read” [Читать - читаешь].
Eddie: Next we take a look at the endings of these verbs in the present tense. If you see the endings [ишь, ешь] or [ёшь], you should just replace them with [и] or [й].
Oksana: So [сидишь] changes to [сиди],[читаешь] to [читай].
Eddie: And if you want your command to sound polite, add [ите] or [йте].
Oksana: [Читайте, сидите]
Eddie: It’s a little different with the verb “to be mad” though.
Oksana: Alright, the word [злиться] has the ending [ся], which means it’s a reflexive verb.
Eddie: Do you remember what a reflexive verb means? Reflexive verbs in Russian are used to indicate the concept of “self”. For example, “I dress myself”. When this happens in English, we use the word “self” or simply omit the object. In Russian, you simply add [ся] or [сь] to the verb.
Oksana: Right. With the ending [ся], it means “to be mad”, [злиться]. If you drop [ся], you’ll get “to make someone mad” [злить]. To make an imperative form from [злиться] we shouldn’t forget about this little [ся]. We change it into [сь] and leave out [ть] from the verb.
Eddie: So if you want to say “don’t make me mad” you should say…
Oksana: [Не зли меня]
Eddie: And if you’re asking someone not to be mad at you, you should add the reflexive ending.
Oksana: [Не злись на меня]
Eddie: Let’s practice a little more using other verbs from this lesson. First we take the verbs as they are, for example…
Oksana: [Разговаривать]
Eddie: To talk.
Oksana: [Убегать]
Eddie: To run away.
Oksana: [Предупреждать]
Eddie: “To warn”. Let’s try to put them into the command form. What do we do first? We put them into the second person, singular, which is “you” in the present tense. What do we get?
Oksana: [Разговариваешь, убегаешь, предупреждаешь]
Eddie: Right. As you can hear, all of our verbs end with [ешь]. What does that mean? It means that to put these verbs into the command form, we simply change the ending [ешь] into [й], and we get the following command words…
Oksana: [Разговаривай!]
Eddie: Talk!
Oksana: [Убегай!]
Eddie: Run away!
Oksana: [предупреждай!]
Eddie: “Warn!” And the last and the simplest thing, if you want to add some politeness to your commands just add [те] to all of them, like in these examples.
Oksana: [Разговаривайте!]
Eddie: Talk!
Oksana: [Убегайте!]
Eddie: Run away!
Oksana: [Предупреждайте!]
OUTRO
Eddie: “Warn!” That just about does it for today. [Пока]
Oksana: [Счастливо!]

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RussianPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
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Who do you think had more fun in that camp, Egor or Vika?

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 9:29 pm
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Hello Nore,


Thank you for your comment.

Actually, attitude to accent depends on a person. I personally respect people who try to speak Russian even with English accent :)


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

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Nore
Wednesday at 4:11 am
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I was listening to this and my Russian-speaking girlfriend walked by and listened in. She started giggling and made fun of the male speaker's English accent when pronouncing Russian words, so this made me wondering, what do Russians/Ukrainians, generally speaking, think of foreign accents?


Usually I speak Russian with a believable Russian accent (I do professional work with my voice and accents happen to be my speacialty), but when I sometimes relax and use my native Swedish accent, people start commenting "wow, your Russian sounds so great with that accent, you should always speak like this", which is a bit crushing because when you learn a language you want to sound like a Russian and you put in effort to achieving an authentic accent...


When I sometimes try to speak Russian with an English accent, because of the way English uses the facial muscles, it's just really hard to make the Russian words sound like anything other than English, so I empathise with the male speaker's difficulties in the dialogue. I think, if you're coming from English as a native language to Russian, you need to really adopt a new accent altogether. As a tip from someone with a lot of experience from learning and perfecting various accents, start with speaking English with a "fake" Russian accent to try it out to get confidence, then, start speaking Russian with the same "fake" accent and then you will start seeing some magic happening with your Russian accent if you stick to it long enough!


As always, thanks again for a great lesson!

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RussianPod101.com
Thursday at 5:32 pm
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Hello dale71645@yahoo.com,


You composed a great sentence, just some grammar should be fixed a little bit :grin:: "Я думаю, что Игорю было веселее, потому что Вика должна была нянчиться с Игорем всё время." :thumbsup:


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

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dale71645@yahoo.com
Sunday at 1:30 am
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Я думаю, что Игорь имел болше забавы, потему-что Вика должна нянчиться с Игорем всё время.

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RussianPod101.com
Sunday at 3:06 pm
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Hello Christina,

Thank you very much for your comment. We will fix it as soon as possible.


Elena

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Christina
Tuesday at 7:02 am
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Typo on the last example phrase on the download pdf's: It should be "но вконце концов'

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 1:56 pm
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Hello Mike,


Thank you for your remark.

I actually couldn't find any mistakes in the quiz.

I took it myself and both р and п were correct.


May be I got your question wrong? Let us know if there is still a problem.

Best,


Svetlana/


Team RussianPod101.com

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mike
Monday at 10:32 pm
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In the written quizzes the р is marked as incorrect when it is correct you are told that the russian п is correct instead.

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LearningTheLanguage
Thursday at 2:26 pm
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It had to have been Vika.


At one point, I was hoping to go to a camp on Lake Baikal.


What is it about giant lakes? I don't know. Do they have a dinosaur there like in Loch Ness? :evil:


And are the bears dangerous in Russia? I saw one once in America, but it ran away. :razz:


Thanks for the great podcast.