Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eddie: Eddie here. Lower Intermediate Series Season 1, Lesson 4. The worst Russian vacation ever so far.
Oksana: Здравствуйте.
Eddie: Hello, everyone. You’re listening to the fourth lesson of the Lower Intermediate Series and we’re in the middle of a little teenage drama her.
Oksana: That’s right. Egor and Vica, a brother and sister, are just in such age that there is no way they can get along well.
Eddie: Yeah, so by now they must have arrived to the camp already.
Oksana: Yes, let’s listen to the conversation and find out if they managed to give each other some rest there.
DIALOGUE
Oksana: Егор! Сколько можно мне мотать нервы! Где ты был полдня?!
Eddie: Мы с друзьями были в лесу недалеко от лагеря.
Oksana: Ты что, не понимаешь, что это опасно?! Сколько раз я тебе говорила, не выходи за территорию лагеря!
Eddie: У нас в лагере скучно. А в лесу мы нашли медвежью берлогу…
Oksana: Вы с ума сошли?!
Eddie: Не бойся, мы не подходили к ней.
Oksana: Всё равно! С этой минуты ты у меня под контролем!
Eddie: Once again, more slowly.
Oksana: Еще раз, медленнее. Егор! Сколько можно мне мотать нервы! Где ты был полдня?!
Eddie: Мы с друзьями были в лесу недалеко от лагеря.
Oksana: Ты что, не понимаешь, что это опасно?! Сколько раз я тебе говорила, не выходи за территорию лагеря!
Eddie: У нас в лагере скучно. А в лесу мы нашли медвежью берлогу…
Oksana: Вы с ума сошли?!
Eddie: Не бойся, мы не подходили к ней.
Oksana: Всё равно! С этой минуты ты у меня под контролем!
Eddie: Once again, with a translation.
Oksana: Еще раз, с переводом. Егор! Сколько можно мне мотать нервы! Где ты был полдня?!
Eddie: Egor! Stop stressing me out! Where have you been for half of the day?!
Oksana: Мы с друзьями были в лесу недалеко от лагеря.
Eddie: We went to the woods not far from the camp with my friends.
Oksana: Ты что, не понимаешь, что это опасно?! Сколько раз я тебе говорила, не выходи за территорию лагеря!
Eddie: Don't you understand how dangerous it is?! How many times have I told you not to go out of the camp territory!
Oksana: У нас в лагере скучно. А в лесу мы нашли медвежью берлогу…
Eddie: The camp is boring. And in the woods we found a bear lair…
Oksana: Вы с ума сошли?!
Eddie: Are you crazy?!
Oksana: Не бойся, мы не подходили к ней.
Eddie: Don't worry, we didn't come close to it.
Oksana: Всё равно! С этой минуты ты у меня под контролем!
Eddie: Doesn't matter! From this minute on, you are under my control!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eddie: The girl has lost her temper.
Oksana: Well, I kind of understand the parents who wanted to get rid of a kid for a while, but putting him on the girl’s shoulders…
Eddie: Yeah. So we got a real conflict here. It’s tough on both of them if it’s going to last for the whole two months. Anyway, let’s hope the situation improves later but now our task is to learn the vocabulary these kids use to express their emotions. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is…
VOCAB LIST
Oksana: [Сколько можно?]
Eddie: How much longer is it going to last? When is it going to stop?
Oksana: [Сколько можно?]
Eddie: Next
Oksana: [Мотать нервы]
Eddie: To make somebody extremely worried, frustrated or mentally exchausted.
Oksana: [Мотать нервы]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Полдня]
Eddie: Half a day.
Oksana: [Полдня]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Опасно]
Eddie: Dangerous.
Oksana: [Опасно]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Выходить]
Eddie: To go out, come out.
Oksana: [Выходить]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Территория]
Eddie: Territory.
Oksana: [Территория]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Скучно]
Eddie: Boring.
Oksana: [Скучно]
Eddie: And next.
Oksana: [Лес]
Eddie: Forest, woods.
Oksana: [Лес]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Найти]
Eddie: To find.
Oksana: [Найти]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Медведь]
Eddie: A bear.
Oksana: [Медведь]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Берлога]
Eddie: A bear lair.
Oksana: [Берлога]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Сойти с ума]
Eddie: To go crazy.
Oksana: [Сойти с ума]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Все равно]
Eddie: It doesn’t matter, anyway.
Oksana: [Все равно]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Подходить]
Eddie: To approach, come up.
Oksana: [Подходить]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [С этой минуты]
Eddie: From this minute on.
Oksana: [С этой минуты]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Под контролем]
Eddie: Under control.
Oksana: [Под контролем]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: We have quite a few words there. Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of them. The first phrase is…
Oksana: [Сколько можно?]
Eddie: It’s an exclamatory phrase. Literally it means “How much can it be?” It expresses frustration, annoyance, irritation or perplexity. It has a meaning of “How much is this going to last? When are you going to stop? When is it going to stop?” Used both individually and in a sentence. Give us an example, Oksana.
Oksana: [Сколько можно есть?! Ты же лопнешь!]
Eddie: Literally “How much is it possible for you to eat?” or “Stop eating! You’re going to burst out soon!”
Oksana: Or you can use it just as an exclamation. [Сколько можно?!]
Eddie: Which means “Stop it!”, implying that you’re sick and tired of what’s happening. The next phrase we have is…
Oksana: [Мотать нервы]
Eddie: Literally to wind someone’s nerves like threads, and it means to make someone’s life difficult by constantly making them worried, frustrated or mentally exhausted.
Oksana: For example, [Он мне всю жизнь мотает нервы].
Eddie: “He’s been making me nervous and exhausted by what he’s doing my whole life! He’s been keeping me stressed out my whole life.
Oksana: There’s also an expression for “to get on somebody’s nerves” which is [действовать на нервы].
Eddie: Next word is [полдня], “half of the day”. In Russian, it’s just one word although it consists of the prefix, [пол], which means “half”, and the word [день], “day”, in the genitive case.
Oksana: You can also say [полгода], for example, with the same prefix. And the word [год], “year” in the genitive case.
Eddie: The next word we have is an adverb which means “dangerous”.
Oksana: [Опасно]. Something that’s usually written on some quick inflammatory or high voltage things.
Eddie: And, of course, you can easily turn it into an adjective.
Oksana: For example [Опасный город].
Eddie: “A dangerous city.” The next word is…
Oksana: [Выходить]
Eddie: Which means “to go out” or “to come out”. The stem of the word is very familiar to you, [ходить]. It’s a multidirectional verb of motion meaning “to go on foot”. And we’ll talk about the prefix [вы] a little later. The next word is…
Oksana: [Территория]
Eddie: “Territory”. No explanation needed, just a heavy Russian accent. What’s next?
Oksana: [Скучно]
Eddie: In our case, it’s an adverb again, “boring”. Please give us some examples where the word [скучно] is an adjective.
Oksana: [Скучный день. Скучная книга]
Eddie: “A boring day” and “a boring book”. Sounds so… [скучно]. Ok, what’s next?
Oksana: [Лес]
Eddie: “A forest”. We already know the word for “a mountain”.
Oksana: [Гора]
Eddie: Let’s keep getting to know nature better. What’s next?
Oksana: [Найти]
Eddie: [Найти] is the verb for “to find” like [найти выход], which means “to find a way out”. Next word?
Oksana: [Медведь]
Eddie: “A bear”, but in our case it’s an adjective.
Oksana: [Медвежья. Медвежья берлога]
Eddie: “A bear lair”.
Oksana: Actually, [берлога] is also a slang word for “house, apartment”, especially a danger one. Like [моя берлога].
Eddie: But in our case it’s a real one, a real dangerous bear lair which Igor doesn’t find scary due to his age yet, but his sister exclaims…
Oksana: [Вы с ума сошли?!]
Eddie: “Are you crazy?” talking in plural about all the kids who went there. And the words for “to go crazy” is…
Oksana: [Сойти с ума]
Eddie: Literally it means “to come down” from someone’s mind or “to go crazy”. Just like in English, it can be used in both positive and kind of romantic and negative meanings.
Oksana: For example, [Я схожу с ума по нему].
Eddie: “I'm crazy about him.” Who is he,Oksana?
Oksana: An imaginary friend. I’d better give you another example. [Ты с ума сошел?! Что ты делаешь?]
Eddie: Oh, that one’s far less romantic. “Are you crazy? What are you doing?” Ok, what’s the next word.
Oksana: It’s a phrase -[ Все равно].
Eddie: A good one. Literally it means “everything the same”, “equal”. It has two main meanings. First, it expresses that something doesn’t really matter to you, you don’t mind any suggested option.
Oksana: [Мне все равно]
Eddie: I don’t care.
Oksana: Another example, [Чай или кофе? Все равно!].
Eddie: “Tea or coffee, anything’s good. I don’t mind.” The next meaning of it is “in any case”, “anyway”.
Oksana: [Я все равно не скажу]
Eddie: I won’t say it anyway, under any circumstances.
Oksana: Or [Я все равно тебя найду].
Eddie: “I’ll find you anyway, no matter what, in any case.” Ok, hold on. Just a little left. The next word is…
Oksana: [Подходить]
Eddie: “To come up”, “to approach”. As you can hear, the stem of the word is [ходить], “to go”. Next.
Oksana: [С этой минуты]
Eddie: This one is easy. It literally means “from this minute”. How would you say “from this day”,Oksana?
Oksana: [С этого дня]
Eddie: Great. We’re almost done with the vocabulary. The last phrase is…
Oksana: [Под контролем]

Lesson focus

Eddie: Which is also easy and requires only your memory. The phrase means “under control”. Grammar, this is what we have to pay special attention to today. And we’re still talking about the verbs of motion, but this time verbs of motion with prefixes.
Oksana: In the previous two lessons, we went thoroughly through four main verbs of motion in Russian. [Ходить, идти]
Eddie: “To go by foot” or “walk”.
Oksana: [Ездить, ехать]
Eddie: “To go by transport”. Here’s the news for you. To the verbs mentioned above, it’s possible to add different prefixes by placing a few extra letters at the front of these verbs you can alter their meaning. Usually, prefixes add direction to the meaning of these verbs.
Oksana: For example, you could change the meaning of “walk” to “walk in”. In English it’s done by adding an adverb after the verb. Words like “in”, “down”, “through” or “across”. In Russian this is achieved with the help of different prefixes.
Eddie: In the dialogue, we came across three words.
Oksana: [Выходить]
Eddie: “To go out” or “to come out”.
Oksana: [Подходить]
Eddie: To come close.
Oksana: [Сойти]
Eddie: “To go” or “come down”. The key word in the first two verbs is [ходить]. The key element in [сойти] is [идти], which comes from [идти]. And the prefixes [в, под] and [со] just gave them a specific direction.
Oksana: Here are some other prefixes you can use the enrich the meaning of the motion verbs you already know. The prefix [в].
Eddie: In.
Oksana: [Входить]
Eddie: To go in.
Oksana: [Вы]
Eddie: Out.
Oksana: [Выходить]
Eddie: To go out.
Oksana: [До]
Eddie: As far as, reach.
Oksana: [Доходить]
Eddie: To go as far as.
Oksana: [За]
Eddie: Drop in, stop by.
Oksana: [Заходить]
Eddie: To stop by.
Oksana: [Об]
Eddie: Around.
Oksana: [Обходить]
Eddie: To go around.
Oksana: [От]
Eddie: Away.
Oksana: [Отходить]
Eddie: To go away.
Oksana: And so on. You can find more of those prefixes in the PDF files.
Eddie: Together with the prefixes, the verbs of motion are slightly modified. Well, to be more precise, only the verbs [идти] and [ездить] are modified. [Ходить] and [ехать] remain the same.
Oksana: Yes, [Идти] changes into [йти]. And [ездить] turns into [езжать].
Eddie: So, to build these new words, we need a prefix plus [ходить], a prefix plus [идти], a prefix plus [езжать] and a prefix plus [ехать]. Give us some real examples, please, Oksana.
Oksana: Ok, I’ll give you pairs of verbs with the same prefixes. The first one will be multidirectional, general. Another one will be unidirectional. [Переходить, перейти]
Eddie: “To go” or “come across”.
Oksana: [Подходить, подойти]
Eddie: To approach.
Oksana: [Приходить, прийти]
Eddie: To arrive.
Oksana: [Проехать, проезжать]
Eddie: To go through, to pass.
Oksana: [Съехать, съезжать]
Eddie: “To go” or “come down from”.
Oksana: [Уехать, уезжать]
Eddie: To leave.
Oksana: Here are a couple of sentences for better understanding. [Подойти ко мне]
Eddie: Come up to me.
Oksana: [Не входить]
Eddie: “Don’t enter. Keep out.” It might be easier for you just to remember each of these verbs, treating each verb as its own word rather than a set of related verbs.

Outro

Oksana: Also, check out our PDF materials to get your knowledge systematized and structured. It’s all there.
Eddie: That just about does it for today. [Пока]
Oksana: [До встречи!]

17 Comments

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RussianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever encountered a bear in the woods?

RussianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:27 PM
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Hello scott,


Thank you for your comment.


Elena


Team RussianPod101.com

scott
Monday at 11:38 PM
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Крым - это територия Украины


this is on the pdf lesson notes

just sayin

RussianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:15 PM
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Hello Gaby,


Thank you for your question. :smile:


Basically "ты с ума сошёл" is an expression derived from "сойти с ума" - "to be crazy". There is no explanation why it is in past, however if you want to say "Are you crazy?" in Russian it will be "ты с ума сошёл/ты сошёл с ума". Present tense cant be used because it will have a meaning of a process, kind "you are getting crazy".


Your sentence ‘ты с ума сойдёшь’ is not in present, but in future tense - "you will be crazy".


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Gaby
Tuesday at 02:33 AM
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Hi!


I was just working through the grammar exercises and noticed that it says 'ты с ума сошёл' which the man translates as 'are you crazy?'. Why is this phrase in the past tense in Russian?

I would have translated it as 'ты с ума сойдёшь'. in the present tense.


Is this correct?


Thanks

RussianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:18 PM
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Hi Katarina,


Thank you for your feedback!

It's possible to remove the romanization, by deselecting [Romanization] at the bottom of the vocab list.

Please let us know if you need any help!


Thank you,

Ofelia

Team RussianPod101.com

Katarina
Monday at 02:56 AM
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I like the stories - it makes the dialogues more real and enjoyable. I also taught many little Russian children while in Russia and can visualise the scenario:)


One question though: Is it possible to choose to remove the romanization on the vocab lists? I mean is there the option to remove it as there is on the dialogue transcript? id find it more helpful to not see it since I find it distracting. Thanks!

RussianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 05:57 PM
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Hi Katarina,


Thank you for your comment!

We are happy you find these lessons useful :smile:


Keep up the good work and feel free to leave us questions, if you have any!


Regards,

Ofelia

Team RussianPod101.com

Katarina
Tuesday at 09:48 PM
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I am finding these lessons are perfect for strengthening my weakness which is producing sentences for myself fluently and a weak vocabulary.


Oh and to correct the previous posts, the guy who does Igor is not American, he is British, lol:)


Anyway, despite the non-native speaker (who is doing a good job really:)), the best thing you have going is the review section! Getting me to repeat whole sentences in Russian is excellent! And the digital technology is a far-cry from the now humble cassette!!!


Great job and keep going! You will never please everyone! :)

RussianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:09 AM
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Hello Michael


Thank you for your message. If you would like to cancel your subscription you may do so easily via your Account page.


rednova55, thank you for the comment.

We're trying to do our best to deliver our lessons with the best quality, and we believe your comment will help us improve our lesson quality.

Thank you again. We'll consider your feedback when we develop new series.


Let us know if you have any other questions.


Sincerely

Piotr

Team RussianPod101.com

The voice of Igor should NOT be played by a non-native speaker with a heavy American accent, especially for the benefit of beginning learners who need to hear native Russian speech patterns, i.e., word and sentence intonation. Moreover, the America spea
Monday at 06:29 AM
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The voice of Igor should NOT be played by a non-native speaker with a heavy American accent, especially for the benefit of beginning learners who need to hear native Russian speech patterns, i.e., word and sentence intonation. Moreover, the America speaking makes numerous pronunciation errors which is not fair to us who wish to imitate native Russian speakers. :angry::angry: