Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eddie: Eddie here. Lower Intermediate Series Season 1, Lesson 3. Cracking down on Russian litter bugs.
Oksana: Всем привет!
Eddie: Hello, everyone. Welcome to lesson number three of the Lower Intermediate Series.
Oksana: We continue our little story about a boy named Egor and his older sister, Vica.
Eddie: Egor is the one who got a summer trip for his birthday, and Vica’s the one who’s supposed to go with him and keep an eye on him.
Oksana: Egor is obviously disappointed with that.
Eddie: And today we’ll find out what Vica thinks about all this. Let’s listen to the dialogue.
DIALOGUE
Oksana: Ну что, Егор, ты идешь?
Eddie: Иду…
Oksana: Не бойся, я не буду тебя контролировать, я даже буду жить отдельно и никуда не буду с тобой ходить!
Eddie: Ладно... Просто мне обидно, что ты тоже получила подарок на мой День Рождения.
Oksana: Егор, это не подарок для меня. Я вообще не хотела ехать. Все мои друзья едут на море, а я с тобой в горный лагерь…
Eddie: Once again, more slowly.
Oksana: Еще раз, медленнее.
Oksana: Ну что, Егор, ты идешь?
Eddie: Иду…
Oksana: Не бойся, я не буду тебя контролировать, я даже буду жить отдельно и никуда не буду с тобой ходить!
Eddie: Ладно... Просто мне обидно, что ты тоже получила подарок на мой День Рождения.
Oksana: Егор, это не подарок для меня. Я вообще не хотела ехать. Все мои друзья едут на море, а я с тобой в горный лагерь…
Eddie: Once again, with a translation.
Oksana: Еще раз, с переводом.
Oksana: Ну что, Егор, ты идешь?
Eddie: So Egor, are you coming?
Oksana: Иду…
Eddie: Coming…
Oksana: Не бойся, я не буду тебя контролировать, я даже буду жить отдельно и никуда не буду с тобой ходить!
Eddie: Don't worry, I'm not going to control you. I'll even be living separately and won't go anywhere with you!
Oksana: Ладно... Просто мне обидно, что ты тоже получила подарок на мой День Рождения.
Eddie: Fine... It's just it's not fair that you also got a present on my birthday.
Oksana: Егор, это не подарок для меня. Я вообще не хотела ехать. Все мои друзья едут на море, а я с тобой в горный лагерь…
Eddie: Egor, it's not a present for me at all. I didn't want to go in the first place. All of my friends are going to the sea, and I'm going to the mountain camp with you…
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Oksana: Seems like they’re both stuck with each other.
Eddie: And Vica seems to be in an even worse position. She’s what 16-17? And she’s spending her summer holidays looking after her brother.
Oksana: So now she’s trying to at least make him stop whining by promising total freedom to him.
VOCAB LIST
Eddie: Let’s have a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is…
Oksana: Бояться
Eddie: To be afraid of, to fear.
Oksana: Бояться
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Контролировать
Eddie: To control.
Oksana: Контролировать
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Даже
Eddie: Even.
Oksana: Даже
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Отдельно
Eddie: Separately.
Oksana: Отдельно
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Обидно
Eddie: It’s annoying, it’s offensive, it hurts.
Oksana: Обидно
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Получить
Eddie: To get, to receive.
Oksana: Получить
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Вообще
Eddie: In general, on the whole, at all, in the first place.
Oksana: Вообще
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: Горный
Eddie: Mountain.
Oksana: Горный
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is…
Oksana: Бояться. “To be afraid of, to be scared of, to fear”.
Eddie: At first it might look like a reflexive verb because of the ending ся. And it is, but it’s one of those words that can’t be used without the ending. It’s like the word “afraid”.
Oksana: Besides, just like in English, this word can be used to express doubt or bad assumption like Боюсь, он не прийдет.
Eddie: “I'm afraid he won’t come.” But in our case this word is used in the command form. Не бойся, literally “don’t be afraid”, but the meaning is “don’t worry”.
Oksana: The next word doesn’t need much explanation. Контролировать. The root is the word “control”, контроль, and having adjusted it to the Russian grammar, we get the word контролировать.
Eddie: “To control, to supervise”. The next word is one of those that we use to give our language more flavor and more emotion, the word “even”.
Oksana: Даже. For example, “I don’t even know him”. Я его даже не знаю.
Eddie: And because of the flexible Russian word order, this word can go almost anywhere in your sentence.
Oksana: Next word is отдельно.
Eddie: An adverb for “separately”. I want to remind you about adverbs and adjectives. Most adverbs in Russian end with о. It’s just like the English “-ly”, отдельно, “separately”.
Oksana: But you can easily turn the adverb into an adjective. Just change о into the ending that adjectives have, ая for feminine, ый for masculine. Like Отдельная комната.
Eddie: Separate room.
Oksana: Отдельный кабинет
Eddie: “Separate office.” Ok, that was a quick review. The next word is…
Oksana: Обидно
Eddie: Another adverb which can easily be transformed into the adjective if you change its ending. Обидно has two main meaning depending on its function in a sentence. Most often it has a meaning of “annoying” or “hurtful”.
Oksana: Мне обидно это слышать.
Eddie: It hurts me to hear this.
Oksana: Обидно, что мы не встретились.
Eddie: “It’s annoying that we didn’t meet.” If it’s an adjective, обидный, most often it means “offensive”.
Oksana: Это обидное слово.
Eddie: It’s an offensive word. Very often it’s used as a verb, обидеть, “to hurt”, usually speaking about feelings.
Oksana: Он тебя обидел?
Eddie: “Did he hurt you?” Ok, what’s the next word?
Oksana: Получить
Eddie: Oh, “to receive”, “to get”. You can получить pretty much anything; a present, a parcel, a salary, получить what you deserve and so on.
Oksana: The next word is вообще.
Eddie: It’s a very popular, colloquial word, sometimes used too often. Sort of like the English “like”. Some people just can’t get enough of it. Вообще has several meanings. The first word is “generally”, “in general”, “on the whole”. Listen to the example.
Oksana: Вообще, она неплохой человек.
Eddie: “On the whole she’s not a bad person.” It also means “at all” when put into a negative sentence.
Oksana: Он мне вообще не нравится.
Eddie: “I don’t like him at all.” And also it has a meaning that we have in the dialogue, “in the first place”, “from the beginning”, “at all”.
Oksana: Я вообще не хотела об этом говорить.
Eddie: “I didn’t want to talk about it in the first place.” Ok, we have one last word to look at.
Oksana: Горный
Eddie: “Mountain”, which is an adjective in our dialogue, describing a camp, a mountain camp.
Oksana: The word for “mountain” itself is гора, but as you know we can make an adjective from any noun. All we need is choose the right ending according to the Russian grammar.

Lesson focus

Eddie: Speaking of grammar, what’s our focus today?
Oksana: Oh, we haven’t finished with the verbs of motion. Last time we only talked about the verbs in the meaning “to go by transport”.
Eddie: Right, we shouldn’t forget about walking. So today’s pair of verbs of motion are…
Oksana: Идти, ходить
Eddie: “To go by foot” or “walk”. Their usage is the same as the usage of the verbs from the previous lesson. All you have to do is to remember which one is unidirectional and which one is multidirectional.
Oksana: The verb идти is the unidirectional, one way verb. The verb ходить is the multidirectional or return trip verb.
Eddie: Let’s review the usage of both of them. The unidirectional идти is used when you’re going in one direction or talking specifically about going in one direction. This form often corresponds to the continuous tenses in English where you say “I am” or “we are”, indicating the ongoing of future process. For example…
Oksana: Егор, ты идешь?
Eddie: “Igor, are you going?” In English, that can also be translated as “Are you coming?” The multidirectional ходить is used when talking about actions in more than one direction, for example a return trip. Also, use this form when you’re talking in general about going somewhere or where there is no motion or the number of directions is irrelevant. For example…
Oksana: Я никуда не буду с тобой ходить.
Eddie: “I won’t go anywhere with you.” Here, many times and directions are implied.
Oksana: Ты ходил к врачу?
Eddie: “Did you go to the doctor’s?” Here, return is implied.
Oksana: Я хожу на работу каждый день
Eddie: “I go to work every day.” Talking in general about a habitual action. Also, I think we should conjugate these verbs in the present tense, just like we did with the verbs ехать and ездить.
Oksana: Ok, let’s take the verb идти first.
Eddie: “To go on foot”, unidirectional.
Oksana: Я иду. Ты идешь. Он (она, оно) идет. Мы идем. Вы идете. Они идут. Now the verb ходить.
Eddie: “To go on foot”, multidirectional.
Oksana: Я хожу. Ты ходишь. Он (она, оно) ходит. Мы ходим. Вы ходите. Они ходят.
Eddie: Ok. Now, a quick sum up. Oksana, tell us the unidirectional verbs, “to go by transport” and “to go on foot”, respectively.
Oksana: Ехать, идти
Eddie: And their multidirectional equivalent?
Oksana: Ездить, ходить

Outro

Eddie: That just about does it for today. Пока
Oksana: До встречи!

12 Comments

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RussianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Do you prefer going on trips with family or friends?

RussianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:53 AM
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Hello Anna,


Your sentences are great, just few mistakes.👍


"Теперь я старая и мне нравится летом оставаться дома и путешевствовать, когда не жарко.

Когда я работала, я ездила в Англию на море с мужем и дочерью, чтобы попрактиковать английский."


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Anna
Saturday at 02:46 AM
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Теперь я старая, и мне нравится летом оставаться дома и путешевствовать, когда не жарко.

Когда я работала, я ездила в Англии на море с мужем и дочерю, чтобы практиковаться на английском.

I4CU
Monday at 04:08 PM
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still don't understand the title of this lesson haha

RussianPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 04:15 PM
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Hello Daniel,


Just small correction: " Я вообще предпочитаю отдыхать далеко от людей. Поэтому я всегда пытаюсь уходить в лес в свой отпуск. "


Elena

Tea RussianPod101.com

Daniel
Wednesday at 04:20 PM
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Here it goes. Я вообще предпочитаю отдыхать далеко от людей. Поэтому я всегда пытаюсь ходить в лес на отпуск. Did I say that right?

RussianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:57 PM
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Hello Lynn,


Translation is correct.


"Он мне вообще не нравится.

"I don't like him at all."


"Мне" means "to me".

If "he" was a subject the translation would be: "Он меня не любит" "Я ему не нравлюсь".


Elena

RussianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:57 PM
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Hello Lynn,


Translation is correct.


"Он мне вообще не нравится.

"I don't like him at all."


"Мне" means "to me".

If "he" was a subject the translation would be: "Он меня не любит" "Я ему не нравлюсь".

Lynn
Tuesday at 10:27 PM
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In the grammar section, a sentence is translated as

"I don't like him at all." I would have guessed the

translation would be "He doesn't like me at all."

Why is "he" not the subject since it is in the

nominative case?

Amalie
Saturday at 11:29 AM
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Hello RussianPod101 listeners,


Thank you for commenting!


Caryn, you are right about the title. It's only related to the introduction to the lesson, not so much to the actual content.


Again, thanks for commenting.


Hope you will continue to enjoy our Russian lessons!



Best regards,


Amalie

Caryn
Saturday at 09:24 AM
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I'm somewhat confused at the name of this lesson, it didn't seem to have anything to do with litterbugs.