Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Yura: Привет всем, с Вами – RussianPod101.com, я – Yura.
Svetlana: А я – Svetlana, здравствуйте, welcome to Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 14 - Are You Feeling Depressed in Russia?
Yura: In this lesson we will learn about impersonal verbs.
Svetlana: the conversation takes place at the university…
Yura: and it is between two fellow students…
Svetlana: The speakers are about the same age so the conversation will be in informal Russian.
Yura: All right, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Коля Привет, ты чего такая грустная? Ты чем-то расстроена?
Инна Нет, просто настроения нет...
Коля И давно это у тебя?
Инна Уже несколько дней. Не хочется никого видеть, нет аппетита, не хочется ничего делать...
Коля Это похоже на депрессию. Я могу тебе чем-нибудь помочь?
Инна Да. Уйди, пожалуйста.
Yura: Let’s listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Коля Привет, ты чего такая грустная? Ты чем-то расстроена?
Инна Нет, просто настроения нет...
Коля И давно это у тебя?
Инна Уже несколько дней. Не хочется никого видеть, нет аппетита, не хочется ничего делать...
Коля Это похоже на депрессию. Я могу тебе чем-нибудь помочь?
Инна Да. Уйди, пожалуйста.
Yura: Let’s listen to the conversation with English translation.
Коля Привет, ты чего такая грустная? Ты чем-то расстроена?
Yura: Hey, why are you so sad? Are you upset about something?
Инна Нет, просто настроения нет...
Yura: No, just in a bad mood...
Коля И давно это у тебя?
Yura: How long have you been like this?
Инна Уже несколько дней. Не хочется никого видеть, нет аппетита, не хочется ничего делать...
Yura: Several days already. I don't want to see anyone, have no appetite, don't want to do anything ...
Коля Это похоже на депрессию. Я могу тебе чем-нибудь помочь?
Yura: It looks like depression. Can I do anything to help?
Инна Да. Уйди, пожалуйста.
Yura: Yes. Go away, please.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Yura: Hmm, seems Inna is not feeling very well. She has depression.
Svetlana: yes, you are right. Depression is one of the most frequent mental diseases nowadays and of course Russians can’t avoid it either.
Yura: you are right. Are there many people in Russia who suffer from the depression?
Svetlana: I am not really sure, but I think many people might be depressed at some point in their lives. Cold weather and harsh economic conditions might trigger depression very easily.
Yura: right, you guys live in such a cold country!
Svetlana: well, it is not only cold, some places where it is not that cold, like Saint-Petersburg, don’t have any sun in winter and it gets dark around three o’clock so I guess this darkness all the time is more depressing than cold. And of course the harsh economic situation worsens people’s mood as well.
Yura: I remember many people in Moscow were kind of mad all the time.
Svetlana: There you go. I guess this was their way to deal with all these emotions
Yura: it makes me feel sad. Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Yura: The first word is
Svetlana: грустный [natural native speed]
Yura: sad
Svetlana: грустный [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: грустный [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: Расстроенный [natural native speed]
Yura: Upset
Svetlana: Расстроенный [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: Расстроенный [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: просто [natural native speed]
Yura: simply, just
Svetlana: просто [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: просто [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: Настроение [natural native speed]
Yura: Mood
Svetlana: Настроение [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: Настроение [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: давно [natural native speed]
Yura: Long time
Svetlana: давно [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: давно [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: Хочется [natural native speed]
Yura: Want
Svetlana: Хочется [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: Хочется [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: аппетит [natural native speed]
Yura: appetite
Svetlana: аппетит [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: аппетит [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: Похоже на [natural native speed]
Yura: Looks like
Svetlana: Похоже на [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: Похоже на [natural native speed]
Yura: Next is...
Svetlana: депрессия [natural native speed]
Yura: Depression
Svetlana: депрессия [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: депрессия [natural native speed]
Yura: Last is
Svetlana: уйти [natural native speed]
Yura: Go away, get away
Svetlana: уйти [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Svetlana: уйти [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Yura: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Svetlana: The first word is расстроенный, which means ‘upset,’ it is a participle. It also changes according to the noun’s declension.
Yura: can I give an example?
Svetlana: sure, go ahead
Yura: ‘an upset girl’ Расстроенная девочка
Svetlana: perfect! The next word is very simple and it is translated in fact simply, just- the word is просто.
Yura: This adverb is frequently used and its place in the sentence is relatively flexible.
Svetlana: Я просто пришел посмотреть. I just came to take a look.
Yura: Great, let’s move to the next word.
Svetlana: the next word is in the title of this lesson - ‘mood’ - настроение. Usually we say...
Yura: I am in a good mood.
Svetlana: У меня хорошее настроение.
Yura: I am in a bad mood.
Svetlana: У меня плохое настроение.
Yura: Ok, so the next word is…
Svetlana: Давно.This adverb means a long time ago. For example, Я давно не был дома.
Yura: ‘I have not been home for a long time.’ Ok, good. The next word is хочется…“I want…”
Svetlana: It means ‘want’ but the subject is in the dative case. For example, мне хочется пить. ‘I want to drink.’
Svetlana: у меня депрессия.
Yura: this word seems easy, so let’s move to the last one.
Svetlana: ok, the last one is the verb уйти which means ‘go away.’ Мне уйти?
Yura: ‘Shall I go away?’
Svetlana: Now let's go to grammar.

Lesson focus

Yura: In this lesson, we’re going to learn how to use the verb “to be” and impersonal verbs.
Svetlana: These verbs are frequently used to express someone’s mood or feelings, which is exactly our focus in this lesson.
Yura: All right, let’s talk about impersonal verbs. Impersonal verbs are the verbs that denote actions or states that happen by themselves, without any active actor.
Svetlana: They have two main functions: First, they denote the mood, the state of mind or human health- Знобить-
Yura: ‘to shiver’
Svetlana: Тошнить - ‘feel like puking’
Yura: Нездоровиться- ‘feel sick’
Svetlana: Хотеться-want, ‘feel like doing something’
Yura: Взгрустнуться- ‘feel sad.’ As you can see, some translations in English are not exactly impersonal so you should just remember those verbs. Some examples, Мне хочется мороженого.
Yura: ‘I feel like eating ice-cream.’
Svetlana: Его тошнит от молока.
Yura: ‘he feels like puking after drinking milk.’ As you might have noticed, in these sentences there is no subject; the pronouns are used in the dative case.
Svetlana: right, the second function of impersonal verbs is to denote the state of nature. For example, Светать-
Yura: to dawn (Ask Yura - ‘to dawn’)
Svetlana: Рассветать- ‘it dawened’
Yura: Холодать- ‘to get chilly’
Svetlana: Вечереть- ‘to grow dark.’ And as we learned in our previous lesson, many impersonal verbs are reflexive verbs formed from personal verbs. не читается – ‘one can’t read’
Yura: спится- ‘one can go to sleep’
Svetlana: не верится- ‘one can’t believe’
Yura: живётся – ‘one can live’
Svetlana: просто не верится, что мои внуки уже пойдут в университет в этом году!
Yura: ‘I just can’t believe my grandchildren are starting university this year!’ All right. What are the forms of impersonal verbs?
Svetlana: Impersonal verbs have infinitives and the forms only in the third person in singular. Let’s talk about the verb “Знобить” meaning “to shiver” For example, Знобить / Знобит / Знобило. Okay, that's all for this lesson.

Outro

Svetlana: Listeners, do you know the powerful secret behind rapid progress?
Yura: Using the entire system.
Svetlana: Lesson notes are an important part of the system.
Yura: They include a transcript and translation of the conversation...
Svetlana ...key lesson vocabulary...
Yura: and detailed grammar explanations.
Svetlana: Lesson notes accompany every audio or video lesson.
Yura: Use them on the site or mobile device or print them out.
Svetlana: Using the lesson notes with audio and video media will rapidly increase your learning speed.
Yura: Go to RussianPod101.com, and download the lesson notes for this lesson right now.
Yura: Then see you next time, everyone!
Svetlana: пока пока!

17 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

RussianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hello RussianPod101.com listeners!

How are you feeling today? Express yourself in Russian!

RussianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 08:57 AM
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Здравствуйте robert groulx,


Спасибо for taking the time to leave us a comment. 😇

Let us know if you have any questions!


Всего наилучшего,

Левенте (Levente)

Team RussianPod101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 10:24 PM
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thanks for the lesson


my favorite words are Ты чем-то расстроена?


robert

RussianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 03:07 AM
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Hello John,


Unfortunately, you can find such kind of conversations in real life between friends or relatives. 😴


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

John
Saturday at 07:25 PM
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This is a conversation that would never happen in real life

RussianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 08:45 AM
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Hello James Stang,


In this case we use Dative case - тебе.


The main function of the Dative case is to point out the indirect object or to indicate the recipient (receiver) of an action.

The main questions of the dative case are Кому? (Komu?) and Чему? (Chemu?), which can be translated into English as "to whom?" "for whom?" "to what?" and "for what?"


Let's take the sentence "Ivan presented flowers to Masha." "Ivan" is the subject (the person who is performing an action); "flowers" is the object acted on by Ivan, and it is put in the accusative case; and "Masha" is the indirect object. "Masha" is the receiver of Ivan's action. Therefore, in Russian, we put the word "Masha" in the dative case instead of saying "to Masha." Thus, the dative case means that we are "giving," "devoting," or "directing" our action to someone (this someone should be put in the dative case), or, alternately, that we are receiving something from someone (in this case, "I" should be put in the dative case).


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

James Stang
Thursday at 10:23 AM
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Why is тебе used in Я могу тебе чем-нибудь помочь Shouldn't it be тебя

RussianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:27 AM
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Hello Paul,


I cannot answer your question because I am not an expert in Russian society. But I think that, of course, the factors you mentioned influence the mood of population.


Best regards,

Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Paul
Saturday at 05:22 PM
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I think this lesson's cultural insight interesting. I've noticed myself how Russians are always so rude to each other and I find it strange. But I assumed this was just the Russian character, but is it a relatively new thing based on current economic or political feelings? Was it not like this during the USSR for example?

RussianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:42 AM
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Hello Omar,

Thank you for your feedback.


The word "тошнить" appeared in list by mistake. It is used with Accusative case, not Dative.


We will delete this word from Lesson notes.

Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Omar
Thursday at 12:58 AM
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Hello, I think there is a mistake on page 7 in the examples. The lesson notes read, "Его тошнит от молока". Since the pronouns need to be in the dative case, shouldn't it be: "Ему тошнит от молока"?