Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Oxana: Всем приверт, с вами Оксана!
Eddie: Eddy here! Gangue Russian Season 1, Lesson 26 - “Your home cooked meal away from home”.
Oxana: Hello, everyone! I’m Oxana! And welcome to Russianpod101!
Eddie: With us you’ll learn to speak Russian with fun and effective lessons!
Oxana: We also provide you with cultural insights.
Eddie: And tips you won’t find in a textbook.
Oxana: Ok, the food is ready!
Eddie: Yes!
Oxana: But, before dinner time, we need review time.
Eddie: Yes, but hurry!
Oxana: Well, remember, last time we learned about family members.
Eddie: Yes, remember! John has one brother and one sister.
Oxana: [Брат и сестра.]
Eddie: And, of course, they wouldn’t exist without the parents.
Oxana: [Родители]
Eddie: And, all together, they make one big happy:
Oxana: [Семья]
Eddie: Right! We also learned a couple of flattering phrases like “Very glad to meet you!” and “We’ve heard so much about you!”.
Oxana: [Очень рады с вами познакомится] and [мы столько слушали о вас].
Eddie: And the last interesting word we’ve learned is “to help yourself”, something you hear every time visiting Russian’s homes.
Oxana: [Угощайтесь]
Eddie: Right! So, let’s listen to today’s dialogue and find out what John is going to help himself to.
DIALOGUE
Елена: [Ну, всё готово. Джон, вы едите мясо?]
Elena: Nu, vsyo gatovo. Dzhon, vy edite myaso?
Джон: [Да, ем.]
John: Da, em.
Елена: [Очень хорошо, я пригоровила своё фирменное блюдо - пельмени в грибном соусе. Бери пока горячие.]
Elena: Ochen’ harasho, ya prigatovila svoyo firmennoe blyudo - pel’meni v gribnom souse. Beri poka garyachiye.
Джон: [Мм, очень вкусно.]
John: Mm, ochen’ vkusno.
Елена: [Давайте я вам ещё положу.]
Elena: Davayte ya vam eshchyo palazhu.
Джон: [Ой, нет, спасибо. Я уже наелся.]
John: Oy, net, spasibo. Ya uzhe naelsya.
Елена: [Ну как вам Москва?]
Elena: Nu kak vam Maskva?
Джон: [В целом, очень понравилось.]
John: V tselom, ochen’ ponravilos’.
Елена: [Приезжайте ещё, мы всегда будем рады вас видеть.]
Elena: Priezzhayte eshchyo, my vsegda budem rady vas videt’.
Eddie: One more time, slowly.
Oxana: Ещё раз, медленнее.
Елена: [Ну, всё готово. Джон, вы едите мясо?]
Elena: Nu, vsyo gatovo. Dzhon, vy edite myaso?
Джон: [Да, ем.]
John: Da, em.
Елена: [Очень хорошо, я пригоровила своё фирменное блюдо - пельмени в грибном соусе. Бери пока горячие.]
Elena: Ochen’ harasho, ya prigatovila svayo firmennoe blyudo - pel’meni v gribnom souse. Beri poka garyachiye.
Джон: [Мм, очень вкусно.]
John: Mm, ochen’ vkusno.
Елена: [Давайте я вам ещё положу.]
Elena: Davayte ya vam eshchyo palazhu.
Джон: [Ой, нет, спасибо. Я уже наелся.]
John: Oy, net, spasibo. Ya uzhe naelsya.
Елена: [Ну как вам Москва?]
Elena: Nu kak vam Maskva?
Джон: [В целом, очень понравилось.]
John: V tselom, ochen’ ponravilos’.
Елена: [Приезжайте ещё, мы всегда будем рады вас видеть.]
Elena: Priezzhayte eshchyo, my vsegda budem rady vas videt’.
Eddie: Once again, with the translation.
Oxana: Ещё раз с переводом.
Oxana: [Ну, всё готово. Джон, вы едите мясо?]
Eddie: Ok, everything’s ready. John, do you eat meat?
Oxana: [Да, ем.]
Eddie: Yes, I do.
Oxana: [Очень хорошо, я пригоровила своё фирменное блюдо - пельмени в грибном соусе.]
Eddie: Very good. I cooked my specialty - dumplings in mushroom sauce.
Oxana: [Бери пока горячие.]
Eddie: Have them while they’re hot.
Oxana: [Мм, очень вкусно.]
Eddie: Very tasty.
Oxana: [Давайте я вам ещё положу.]
Eddie: Let me give you some more.
Oxana: [Ой, нет, спасибо. Я уже наелся.]
Eddie: No, thank you. I'm already full.
Oxana: [Ну как вам Москва?]
Eddie: So what do you think of Moscow?
Oxana: [В целом, очень понравилось.]
Eddie: In general, I really liked it.
Oxana: [Приезжайте ещё, мы всегда будем рады вас видеть.]
Eddie: Come again. We’ll always be happy to see you.
VOCAB LIST
Eddie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Oxana: [Готовый]
Eddie: Ready.
Oxana: [Готовый]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Есть]
Eddie: To eat.
Oxana: [Есть]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Мясо]
Eddie: Meat.
Oxana: [Мясо]
Eddie: And next.
Oxana: [Готовить]
Eddie: To cook, to prepare.
Oxana: [Готовить]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Фирменное блюдо]
Eddie: Specialty.
Oxana: [Фирменное блюдо]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Пельмени]
Eddie: Dumplings.
Oxana: [Пельмени]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Соус]
Eddie: Sauce.
Oxana: [Соус]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Брать]
Eddie: To take.
Oxana: [Брать]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Пока]
Eddie: While, still.
Oxana: [Пока]
Eddie: And next.
Oxana: [Горячий]
Eddie: Hot.
Oxana: [Горячий]
Eddie: And next.
Oxana: [Положить]
Eddie: To put, put down.
Oxana: [Положить]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Уже]
Eddie: Already.
Oxana: [Уже]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Наесться]
Eddie: To be full.
Oxana: [Наесться]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [В целом]
Eddie: In general.
Oxana: [В целом]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Приезжать]
Eddie: To come, to arrive.
Oxana: [Приезжать]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Всегда]
Eddie: Always.
Oxana: [Всегда]
Eddie: And next.
Oxana: [Видеть]
Eddie: To see.
Oxana: [Видеть]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eddie: Let’s listen to the conversation. Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Oxana: The first phrase we heard was [Ну, всё готово].
Eddie: [Ну], a best conversation starter, changer and finisher. Today, we translated it as “Ok!”, and [всё горово] literally means “Everything is ready!”.
Oxana: The word [готовый] itself means “ready”. But when we describe things or people with it, we usually use the short form of this adjective, [готов]. For example, [суп готов] or [я готова].
Eddie: Right! We should just remember that it changes according to genders and number.
Oxana: But, when we’re talking about things in general, when we don’t mention any particular object, we obviously don’t have a gender to consider, therefore we can just use the adverb [готово], like [вс готово].
Eddie: “Everything’s ready!” Next, Denise’s mother wants to make sure John is not vegetarian, so she asks him whether he eats meat.
Oxana: [Вы едите мясо?]
Eddie:Literally “You eat meat?”
Oxana: [едите] comes from the word [есть] - “to eat”. It might be a bit confusing at first, because there’s also the verb “to be” which has the exact same spelling [есть] like in [у меня есть].
M1: But you can easily figure out which [есть] is meant by the context. Besides, the verb [есть] in the meaning “to be” doesn’t have any conjugations, just tense changes. If you hear conjugations, 100% chance it’s the verb “to eat”.
Oxana: Like in [Я ем] - “I eat”.
Eddie: Right! Next we have Denise’s mother advertising some food she made.
Oxana: [Я приготовила своё фирменное блюдо, пельмени в грибном соуде]. [Приготовила] comes from the word [готовить] - “to cook” or “to prepare”.
Eddie: And the prefix [при] just turned it into a perfective verb, a complete action.
Oxana: Yes, so, if you’re talking about cooking in general, like “I cook myself.”, for example, [я сама готовлю], then you don’t need a prefix.
Eddie: But, in our case, it was one successfully completed action, so the mother said [приготовила].
Oxana: But, this word also has a meaning of “to prepare”, for example, [я приготовилась к встрече] - “I prepared myself for the meeting.”. “Myself” because we have the reflexive ending [ся] in the end.
Eddie: And, as you might have noticed, it has a similar sounding with the word [готов]. That’s right! These words have the same stem.
Oxana: Ok! Next we have [фирменное блюдо]. The word [блюдо] literally means “dish”. For example, [традиционное блюдо] - “traditional dish”.
Eddie: It’s a bit hard to say why they call it [фирменное].
Oxana: Well, [фирменное] in Russian means “firm”, but also has a meaning of “brand”. So, if you have your own [фирменное блюдо] it means you have your own brand and this special dish has your name on it.
Eddie: So, kind of like “brandish”. It’s just we have the tender word [фирма] into an adjective and make [фирмненный] out of it. And what is that [фирмненное блюдо] Denise’s mother is so proud of?
Oxana: [Пельмени]. I love them! Usually people eat these meat dumplings with sour cream or butter, but I personally love them with soy sauce.
Eddie: So, the special ingredient must be the mushroom sauce, which makes Denise’s mom [пельмени], so [фирменное].
Oxana: Must be the [грибной соус] sauce.
Eddie: Next we have the command word “take”.
Oxana: [Бери] which comes from the Infinitive [брать] - “to take”.
Eddie:This is one of the words that you can’t change into the Perfective form. There’s just another verb for the Perfective “to take”.
Oxana: [Взять]. We learned it before. Remember when John was buying [мятрёшка]? He said [Я возьму] - “I’ll take!”. That’s because he meant one specific act, buying a doll, and he wasn’t planning on buying dolls regularly.
M1: But, today, we had to use the Imperfective “to take” which is [брать], because Denise implied that John shouldn’t limit himself with one portion of dumplings, but keep taking them from a bowl, again and again.
Oxana: That’s right! If he said [возьми], it mean just take a little and that’s it for you today. But we have to he hospitable.
Eddie: Next we had “Wow! They’re hot!”.
Oxana: [Пока горячие.]
Eddie: We use the adjective “hot” in the plural form because we obviously not talking about one hot dumpling.
Oxana: Right! And the reaction on the first bite was [Очень вкусно].
Eddie: Of course, you could’ve said [Очень вкусные] in plural, but John decided to say it’s very tasty, so he used the adverb [вкусно].
Oxana:And, of course, what can the mother say to that? Just to offer to give him more! [Давайте я вам еще положу.]
Eddie: [Давайте] means “Let me!”, in the polite form. [вам] is “to you”, [ещё] literally means “again” or “more”.
Oxana: And [положу] comes from the word [положить], which means “to put” or “to put down”.
Eddie: In our case, to put on John’s plate. But John seems to have had enough. What does he say?
Oxana: [Ой нет, спасибо, я уже наелся.]
Eddie: This small interjection [ой] is usually said when you get surprised or when you hurt yourself. Of course, people don’t stop with that and keep expressing their emotions. But [ой] is what they usually start from. But in this dialogue, John just wants to show how full he is and does all sorts of sounds just to prevent the mother from filling his plate again.
Oxana: Right! So he just emphasizes on his [нет] here. Then we have the phrase [уже наелся]. [уже] means “already” and [наелся] is the verb for “full”.
Eddie: But it’s the masculine form, right? How would you say it about yourself?
Oxana:[Я наелась]. It’s the verb used in the Past Tense, therefore to conjugate it we only need genders and number. [Она наелась/ они наелись.]
Eddie:Then goes the question John is probably tired of already.
Oxana: Well, not just him. I’ve been living in China for five years and heard that question nearly every day. For it’s just they taught Chinese people loved foreigners admiring their country and got so resentful to it. But then I realized it’s just natural to ask a foreigner’s opinion about the country. And this is what every foreigner goes through, a set of annoying, but inevitable questions.
Eddie: Yes, maybe! But we’ve been hearing this question a lot, even in this series of lessons. I think our listeners can already start developing some resent.
Oxana: It’s ok, Eddy! We have to prepare them for the worst. Anyway, we heard [Как вам Москва?].
Eddie: Which is “How do you find Moscow?” or “What do you think of Moscow?”. And the answer is?
Oxana: [В целом, очень понравилось.] - “Generally, I liked it.” [в целом] literally means “in general”, “generally”.
Eddie: So, it means that might’ve been some unpleasant moments in John’s trip. But generally the impression is positive. And because it’s so positive, Denise’s father tells him to come again.
Oxana: [Приезжайте ещё]. We know [ещё] - “more” or “again”. And [приезжайте] is a polite command form from the word [приезжать] - “to come by transport”.
Eddie:Then goes the final formal polite phrase “Will always be happy to see you!”.
Oxana: [Мы всегда будем вас видеть]. [Всегда] is a simple adverb for “always”, [будем] it’s just the verb “to be” in the Future Tense and plural number. [мы будем] - “we will”.
Eddie: The word [рады] should be fresh in your heads as we just learned it in the previous lesson, it means “glad”. Here, it’s used in the plural form [рады]. The word [рад] should be fresh in your heads as we just learned it in the previous, it means “glad”. Here, it’s used in the plural form [рады].
Oxana: And the last word is [видеть] - “to see”.
Eddie:Both have the same stem, but when conjugated, you’ll probably just have to remember all of them, because making too many associations might puzzle you even more. Check out our PDF files, they make everything clear for you!
LESSON FOCUS
Eddie: We had a lot to talk about in the vocabulary part, we should probably make our grammar section short and easy.
Oxana: Let’s try. How about we talk about just one word, [Пока]?
Eddie: It’s not time for goodbyes yet.
Oxana: No, Eddie, it’s going to be another [пока]. Yes, it sounds exactly like the parting word [пока] but it has a lot more to offer than just “goodbye”.
Eddie: Sounds good. What is it?
Oxana: Another meaning this word has is “while” or “yet”.
Eddie: I think we’ll understand it better if you give us some examples.
Oxana: Ok. [Пока он спал, я готовила завтрак.]
Eddie: While he was sleeping, I was cooking breakfast.
Oxana: [Давай посмотрим фильм пока он не пришёл.]
Eddie: Let’s watch a movie while he hasn’t come yet.
Oxana: [Я должен с ним встретится пока он в Москве.]
Eddie: “I have to meet him while I'm in Moscow.” I see, but that was all in the meaning of “while”. How about “still”? You mentioned it too.
Oxana: Yes, that too, but not the English “yet” like what you use in the questions like “Are you up yet?” That’s not the case.
Eddie: So what is the case? Give us some examples.
Oxana: [Он пока не пришёл.]
Eddie: He hasn’t come yet. He hasn’t come still.
Oxana: [Я пока не знаю.]
Eddie: “I don’t know yet.” I see. So the “goodbye” [пока] is actually related to all the other [пока]. You’re kind of saying “yet” implying a short “bye-bye” like we are yet to meet.
Oxana: Excellent observation, Eddie. I guess these words are related.
Eddie: The last thing in the lesson we should talk a bit more about is the word “to eat”.
Oxana: You mean its conjugations, right? Well, I’ll tell them all to you now. Listen carefully and try to remember.
Oxana: [Я ем.]
Eddie: I eat.
Oxana: [Мы едим.]
Eddie: We eat.
Oxana: [Ты ешь.]
Eddie: You eat.
Oxana: [Вы едите.]
Eddie: You eat (plural or polite form).
Oxana: [Он/она/оно ест.]
Eddie: He/she/it eats.
Oxana: [Они едят.]
Eddie: “They eat.” The word “to eat” and “to be full” are also related.
Oxana: [Есть/наесться]
Eddie: Both have the same stem, but when conjugated you’ll just have to remember all of the…
OUTRO
Eddie: That just about does it for today! Oxana, I’d like to share a study tip a listener shared with us.
Oxana: You’re talking about the student who uses just the conversation tracks to review the lessons!
Eddie: Oxana, you read my mind! Yes, a listener of ours listens to each lesson several times.
Oxana: Then afterwards gets the conversation only track from our site.
Eddie:She then listens to them on shuffle, again and again, she created her own immersion program using Russianpod101.com.
Oxana:This is a great idea! Please give it a try and let us know what you think.
Eddie: Ok! [До свидания.]
Oxana: [До новых встреч. Пока!]
Eddie:[Пока!]
Елена: [Ну, всё готово. Джон, вы едите мясо?]
Elena: Nu, vsyo gatovo. Dzhon, vy edite myaso?
Джон: [Да, ем.]
John: Da, em.
Елена: [Очень хорошо, я пригоровила своё фирменное блюдо - пельмени в грибном соусе. Бери пока горячие.]
Elena: Ochen’ harasho, ya prigatovila svoyo firmennoe blyudo - pel’meni v gribnom souse. Beri poka garyachiye.
Джон: [Мм, очень вкусно.]
John: Mm, ochen’ vkusno.
Елена: [Давайте я вам ещё положу.]
Elena: Davayte ya vam eshchyo palazhu.
Джон: [Ой, нет, спасибо. Я уже наелся.]
John: Oy, net, spasibo. Ya uzhe naelsya.
Елена: [Ну как вам Москва?]
Elena: Nu kak vam Maskva?
Джон: [В целом, очень понравилось.]
John: V tselom, ochen’ ponravilos’.
Елена: [Приезжайте ещё, мы всегда будем рады вас видеть.]
Elena: Priezzhayte eshchyo, my vsegda budem rady vas videt’.

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RussianPod101.com
Saturday at 6:30 pm
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Hello RussianPod101 listeners!

Do you consider yourself the perfect houseguest?

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RussianPod101.com
Thursday at 12:04 pm
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Hi Yixin,


Thank you for posting.

We have added the review for this lesson.

Let us know if you have questions.


Sincerely,

Laura

Team RussianPod101.com

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Yixin
Tuesday at 6:32 pm
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Hi,


Where is the 'Review' audio file? Or is there no Review for this lesson? Thanks.

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RussianPod101.com
Tuesday at 9:40 pm
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Hello Michael,


Thank you very much for your question.


The word "понравилась" is a verb in the past tense. Could you explain please more detail why do you think that "понравилась" was used as an adjective in the dialog?


Elena

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Michael
Sunday at 5:23 am
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I am having trouble understanding the word


понравилась


it's translated and used as an adjective in the dialog, but this seems to be a reflexive verb in the past tense. I thought most Russian adjectives ended in an и or -ий Are there other examples where Russians would prefer to use a reflexive verb + dative case than use a direct verbs?