Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Oxana: [Привет всем, с вами Оксана!]
Eddie: Eddie here! Gangue Russian Season 1, Lesson 25 - “Get treated like a tsar in Russia”. So, today is a special occasion.
Oxana:Yes, John get an invitation.
Eddie: Remember his friends that he called in the very first lesson. Well, it will be weird if they didn’t meet after that.
Oxana:He’ll get to meet Denise’s whole family.
Eddie: That’s right! But, let’s look back for a moment and remember what we learned in the previous lesson.
Oxana: Yes, we had some useful vocabulary there. For example, [Я заблудился].
Eddie: “I’m lost.”. But being lost can bring you an unexpected surprise. For John it was a Ukrainian woman, Elena.
Oxana: [Я немогу поверить.]
Eddie: And that’s exactly how she reacted: “I can’t believe it!”. And then she said she worked not far from there.
Oxana: [Я работаь недалеко отсюда.]
Eddie: Also, she offered to meet him and have a chat sometime.
Oxana: [Давайте как-нибудь встретимся, пообщаемся.]
Eddie: And his natural answer was:
Oxana: [С удовольствием!]
Eddie: “With pleasure!”. We also learned a useful expression for “I’ll call you!”.
Oxana: [Я вам позвоню.]
Eddie: Great! Now, let’s listen in to today’s lesson.
DIALOGUE
Елена: [Наконец-то Джон. Проходи в комнату.]
Elena: Nakonets-ta John. Prahadi v komnatu.
Джон: [Спасибо.]
John: Spasibo.
Елена: [Познакомься, это мои родители Владимир и Ольга, и сестра Маша.]
Elena: Paznakomsya, eto moi raditeli Vladimir i Ol’ga, i sestra Masha.
Джон: [Здравствуйте, я Джон.]
John: Zdrastvuyte, ya John.
Ольга: [Здравствуйте Джон, очень рады с вами познакомиться. Мы столько слышали о вас.]
Olga: Zdrastvuyte John, ochen; rady s vami paznakomitsa. My stol’ko slyshali o vas.
Джон: [И я очень рад с вами познакомиться. А вот это сувениры из Америки.]
John: I ya ochen’ rad s vami paznakomitsa. A vot eta suveniry iz Ameriki.
Ольга: [Спасибо большое! Садитесь Джон, угощайтесь. А где ваша семья?]
Olga: Spasibo bol’shoe! Sadites’ John. ugoshchyaytes’. A gde vasha sem’ya?
Джон: [Родители живут в Калорадо, сестра в Калифорнии, брат в Нью-Йорке. Ну а я в Мичигане.]
John: Raditeli v Kaloroda, sestra v Kalifornii, brat v N’yu-Yorke. Nu a ya v Michigane.
Ольга: [О, у вас большая семья.]
Olga: O. u vas bal’shaya sem’ya.
Джон: [Да, у меня есть фотография, вот...]
John: Da, u menya est’ fatagrafiya, vot...
Eddie: Once again, more slowly.
Oxana: Ещё раз, медленнее.
Елена: [Наконец-то Джон. Проходи в комнату.]
Elena: Nakonets-ta John. Prahadi v komnatu.
Джон: [Спасибо.]
John: Spasibo.
Елена: [Познакомься, это мои родители Владимир и Ольга, и сестра Маша.]
Elena: Paznakomsya, eto moi raditeli Vladimir i Ol’ga, i sestra Masha.
Джон: [Здравствуйте, я Джон.]
John: Zdrastvuyte, ya John.
Ольга: [Здравствуйте Джон, очень рады с вами познакомиться. Мы столько слышали о вас.]
Olga: Zdrastvuyte John, ochen; rady s vami paznakomitsa. My stol’ko slyshali o vas.
Джон: [И я очень рад с вами познакомиться. А вот это сувениры из Америки.]
John: I ya ochen’ rad s vami paznakomitsa. A vot eta suveniry iz Ameriki.
Ольга: [Спасибо большое! Садитесь Джон, угощайтесь. А где ваша семья?]
Olga: Spasibo bol’shoe! Sadites’ John. ugoshchyaytes’. A gde vasha sem’ya?
Джон: [Родители живут в Калорадо, сестра в Калифорнии, брат в Нью-Йорке. Ну а я в Мичигане.]
John: Raditeli v Kaloroda, sestra v Kalifornii, brat v N’yu-Yorke. Nu a ya v Michigane.
Ольга: [О, у вас большая семья.]
Olga: O. u vas bal’shaya sem’ya.
Джон: [Да, у меня есть фотография, вот...]
John: Da, u menya est’ fatagrafiya, vot…
Eddie: Once again, with the translation.
Oxana: Ещё раз, с переводом.
Oxana: [Наконец-то Джон. Проходи в комнату.]
Eddie: Finally, John, come in to the room.
Oxana: [Спасибо.]
Eddie: Thank you.
Oxana: [Познакомься, это мои родители Владимир и Ольга, и сестра Маша.]
Eddie: Let me introduce you to my parents, Vladimir and Olga. And my sister, Masha.
Oxana: [Здравствуйте, я Джон.]
Eddie: Hello, I'm John.
Oxana: [Здравствуйте Джон, очень рады с вами познакомиться. Мы столько слышали о вас.]
Eddie: Hello, John. We’re very glad to meet you.
Oxana: [Мы столько слышали о вас.]
Eddie: We’ve heard so much about you.
Oxana: [И я очень рад с вами познакомиться. А вот это сувениры из Америки.]
Eddie: I'm very glad to meet you too. Oh, here are some souvenirs from America.
Oxana: [Спасибо большое! Садитесь Джон, угощайтесь.]
Eddie: Thank you very much. John, sit down and help yourself.
Oxana: [А где ваша семья?]
Eddie: And where are your family?
Oxana: [Родители живут в Калорадо, сестра в Калифорнии, брат в Нью-Йорке. Ну а я в Мичигане.]
Eddie: My parents live in Colorado, my sister is in California and my brother is in New York. Well, and I live in Michigan.
Oxana: [О, у вас большая семья.]
Eddie: Oh, you have a big family.
Oxana: [Да, у меня есть фотография, вот...]
Eddie: Yes, I have a picture. Here.
VOCAB LIST
Eddie: Let’s look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Oxana: [Команта]
Eddie: Room.
Oxana: [Комната]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Познакомиться]
Eddie: To meet, to get acquainted with.
Oxana: [Познакомиться]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Родители]
Eddie: Parents.
Oxana: [Родители]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Сестра]
Eddie: Sister.
Oxana: [Сестра]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Брат]
Eddie: Brother.
Oxana: [Брат]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Рад]
Eddie: Glad, pleased.
Oxana: [Рад]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Столько]
Eddie: So many, so much, this many, this much.
Oxana: [Столько]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Слышать]
Eddie: To here.
Oxana: [Слышать]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Угощать]
Eddie: To treat with, to wine and dine.
Oxana: [Угощать]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Угощаться]
Eddie: To help yourself (with food and drink).
Oxana: [Угощаться]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Семья]
Eddie: Family.
Oxana: [Семья]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Жить]
Eddie: To live.
Oxana: [Жить]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [Фотография]
Eddie: Photo.
Oxana: [Фотография]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eddie: Now, let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Oxana:The first word we’ll look at is [комната] meaning “a room”. A simple noun of the feminine gender [Проходи в комнату].
Eddie: “Come into the room!”. We’ve met this word [проходи] so many times, and it’s never used in its primary meaning which is “to go through”. We heard it in the restaurant, now at home.
Oxana: Yes, this word wears many hats. You can translate it as “come in”, “this way” and so on. So, basically, use it in all the situations when you invite people to come somewhere.
Eddie: Then we have a very interesting word that is used in 90% of introductions.
Oxana: [Познакомься] or [познакомьтесь], if it’s formal.
Eddie: Literally, it means “meet” or “get [unintelligible 00:47:28] with” as it sounds like a polite command. You’ve learned the phrase [приятно познакомиться] before. So, it’s the exact same word [познакомиться], just used in a command form.
F1: Also, we’ve learned the phrase [разрешите представить] before, which means “Let me introduce…”, but it was a little bit too formal. Usually it’s an after use just this one word: [Познакомься].
Eddie: And you’re saying it to a person to whom you will introduce the people.
Oxana: Right! Denis is introducing his parents and the word for parents is [родители]. It comes from the word [родить] which means “to give birth”.
Eddie: Good to know! We also learned the words for “brother” and “sister”. I think they remotely resemble the pronunciation of the English “brother” and “sister”.
Oxana: They do. [Брат] means “brother” and [сестра] means “sister”.
Eddie:Then there’s a phrase for “Nice to meet you!”, but it’s a little different from what we’ve learned before.
Oxana: Before it was [Приятно с вами познакомиться]. Now we just change [приятно] into [рад], which means “glad”. For a woman, it would be [рада].
Eddie: So, is this word any different from [приятно]?
Oxana:Well, as different as “pleased” and “glad”. They’re interchangeable in this phrase, but in other situations you should mind the difference.
Eddie:Right! For example, in the phrase “I’m glad you came!”, we should probably use [рад].
Oxana: Unless my visit gave you some real pleasure in a questionable way.
Eddie: Ok, I think we got the point. Next we have the phrase “We’ve heard so much about you!”.
Oxana:[Мы столько слышали о вас]
Eddie: We should break down this phrase. First of all, tell us about the word [столько].
Oxana: It can have two meanings. The meaning matching our dialogue would be “so much”, but because there is no division into “much” and “many” in Russian, it can as well mean “so many”. For example, [ты съел столько блинов].
Eddie: “You ate so many pancakes.”
Oxana: Right! It can also mean “this much” or “this many”. When you’re pointing at the concrete amount of number of something, for example [Нам как раз нужно столько денег.].
Eddie: “We need exactly this much money.”. The next word in the phrase was [слышали] which means “we heard” or “we’ve heard”.
Oxana: It comes from the word [слышать] meaning “to hear”. You might be interested to know the word for “listen”, as well. It only differs in one letter from [слышать] and sounds like [слушать].
Eddie: [Слышали о вас]. [О] is a preposition for “about”. [о вас] means “about you”, so after everyone exchanges greetings and compliments, and after John is done with giving out his American souvenirs, it’s time to sit down for a cup of tea.
Oxana: Yes, we have two words in a polite command form here. [Садитесь] and [угощайтесь].
Eddie:John has already received an invitation to sit down from Elena in the plane. Now, he’ll even get a treat for that.
Oxana: You’re talking about him as if he’s a puppy, but actually poodles have a vocabulary of about 300 words. Do you think John has outdone them, already?
Eddie: Now you’re being poisonous.
Oxana: Anyway, the word [угощайтесь] means “help yourself” in our context. But, actually, it’s said every time you offer food to a person and usually at home. It means something like “treat yourself”.
Eddie: Kind of appropriate! We should mention that it’s a reflexive verb and if we drop [ся] we’ll get a word meaning “to treat” as in the phrase “to treat someone with something”.
Oxana: Right! So, we have a curious father next. Asking about family seem to be a natural way to get to know someone. [А где ваша семья]
Eddie: [семья] meaning family is a feminine noun. Therefore we say [ваша семья].
Oxana: This word has an interesting origin, or better said, an interesting structure. It’s a combination of seven, which is [семь] in Russian, and “I”, which is [я] in Russian. Literally, it means “the seven of me”.
Eddie:Sounds logical, especially for earlier times when a family of seven was considered to be average.
Oxana: Yes, so a family would be, again, [семья].
Eddie: the next word is very familiar to us. The word “to live”.
Oxana: [Жить]. It can also mean “to stay” when we’re talking about a long time in a hotel, for example.
Eddie: John is talking about his family. First, the parents. The word is obviously plural, so we conjugate the verb [жить] as:
Oxana: [Живут]
Eddie: And, for a “brother” and “sister” it would be:
Oxana: [Живёт]
Eddie: As they both represent the third person in grammar. Three kids is a big family for modern Russia, and Denise’s father feels like saying it:
Oxana: [О, у вас большая семья.]
Eddie: [Большой] means “big”, and because [семья] is feminine, this adjective should also take the form appropriate for the feminine gender.
Oxana: [Большая]
Eddie: And the last word for today is “a picture” meaning “a photo”.
Oxana: Which will sound familiar to you as we already know the word for “to take a picture” - [Фотографировать]. “A picture” itself sounds like [фотография]. [У меня есть фотография]
Eddie: “I have a picture.”
LESSON FOCUS
Eddie: The grammar of today’s lesson will be the extension of the previous lesson, which was about pronouns.
Oxana: In the previous lesson we learned the basics of the Russian pronouns, personal and possessive pronouns in the nominative case.
Eddie: All those [я, он, мой, его].
Oxana: Yes, but as I said, all that was in the nominative case, the dictionary form. But each of the Russian pronouns decline according to their case, just like the nouns. In today’s lesson, we had the following: [с вами, о вас, и вас] and [и меня].
Eddie: Luckily, as often happens in the Russian language, pronouns often decline according to certain patterns.
Oxana: That’s right. Actually, most Russian language materials give long tables of pronoun according to every grammatical case and when building a sentence you have to search for the appropriate pronoun in a table of a certain case. That’s a little too complicated.
Eddie: But we offer you a different approach. Remember the pronouns together with the prepositions or in a context so they have some strong associations in your head? So we’re kind of doing it the other way around. Remember a pronoun with a preposition and the case it belongs to.
Oxana: So let’s take a look back at the pronouns we had in the dialogue. The first one was [с вами] meaning “with you”.
Eddie: Now let’s listen and try to remember how all the rest of the pronouns sound with the preposition [с] meaning “with”.
Oxana: [Со мной]
Eddie: With me.
Oxana: [С нами]
Eddie: With us.
Oxana: [С тобой]
Eddie: With you.
Oxana: [С вами]
Eddie: With you (plural or polite form).
Oxana: [С ним]
Eddie: With him.
Oxana: [С ней]
Eddie: With her.
Oxana: [С ними]
Eddie: “With them.” Pronouns with the preposition [с] require the instrumental case. Here are some short sample sentences.
Oxana: [Ты пойдёшь со мной?]
Eddie: Will you go with me?
Oxana: [Я с ними не общаюсь.]
Eddie: I don’t see them, don’t talk to them.
Oxana: [Кто это с тобой?]
Eddie: “Who’s that with you?” Next we had [о вас] which means “about you”. Actually, we might as well add the prepositions [на] and [в] here, meaning “on” and “in”, as the pronouns with these prepositions have the exact same forms. Let’s listen.
Oxana: [Обо мне, во мне, на мне.]
Eddie: About me, in me, on me.
Oxana: [О нас, в нас, на нас.]
Eddie: About us, in us, on us.
Oxana: [О теве, в тебе. на тебе.]
Eddie: About you, in you, on you.
Oxana: [О вас, в вас, на вас.]
Eddie: About you, in you, on you (plural or polite form).
Oxana: [О нём. в нём, на нём.]
Eddie: About him, in him, on him.
Oxana: [О ней, в ней, на ней.]
Eddie: About her, in her, on her.
Oxana: [О них. в них, на них.]
Eddie: “About them, in them, on them.” And, of course, here are a couple of examples for better memorization.
Oxana: [Мы ничего о нём не знаем.]
Eddie: We know nothing about him.
Oxana: [В нём есть что-то особенное.]
Eddie: “There’s something special about him.” Literally “in him”.
Oxana: [На ней было красное платье.]
Eddie: She was wearing a red dress.
Oxana: [На них можно положитлся.]
Eddie: “They are reliable people.” ‘You can rely on them.” The case all these pronouns were used in is the prepositional one. The last set of pronouns will go with the preposition [у] which literally means “at somebody’s” but it’s used in such sentences as [у меня есть/у меня нет/у него дома] and so on. Let’s listen to those pronouns.
Oxana: [У меня.]
Eddie: I have.
Oxana: [У нас.]
Eddie: We have.
Oxana: [У тебя.]
Eddie: You have.
Oxana: [У вас.]
Eddie: You have (plural or polite form).
Oxana: [У него.]
Eddie: He has.
Oxana: [У неё.]
Eddie: She has.
Oxana: [У них.]
Eddie: “They have.” [у] requires the genitive case, which is the one we’ve just put our pronouns into. Here are some sample sentences.
Oxana: [У меня болит живот.]
Eddie: I have a stomach ache.
Oxana: [У тебя есть собака?]
Eddie: Do you have a dog?
Oxana: [Сегодня будет вечеринка у них дома.]
Eddie: There will be a party at their home tonight.
Oxana: [Я вчера был у неё.]
Eddie: “I was at her place yesterday.” But, as you already know, in Russian there are fewer prepositions than in English and the meaning is expressed only through the modified words, including the pronouns. For example, the phrase “to me” in Russian…

Outro

Eddie: That just about does it for today! Oxana, I’d like to share a study tip a listener shared with us.
Oxana: You’re talking about the student who uses just the conversation tracks to review the lessons!
Eddie: Oxana, you read my mind! Yes, a listener of ours listens to each lesson several times.
Oxana:Then afterwards gets the conversation only track from our site.
Eddie:She then listens to them on shuffle, again and again, she created her own immersion program using Russianpod101.com.
Oxana:This is a great idea! Please give it a try and let us know what you think.
Eddie: Ok, [До свидания].
Oxana: [До новых встреч. Пока!]
Eddie: [Пока!]
Елена: [Наконец-то Джон. Проходи в комнату.]
Elena: Nakonets-ta John. Prahadi v komnatu.
Джон: [Спасибо.]
John: Spasibo.
Елена: [Познакомься, это мои родители Владимир и Ольга, и сестра Маша.]
Elena: Paznakomsya, eto moi raditeli Vladimir i Ol’ga, i sestra Masha.
Джон: [Здравствуйте, я Джон.]
John: Zdrastvuyte, ya John.
Ольга: [Здравствуйте Джон, очень рады с вами познакомиться. Мы столько слышали о вас.]
Olga: Zdrastvuyte John, ochen; rady s vami paznakomitsa. My stol’ko slyshali o vas.
Джон: [И я очень рад с вами познакомиться. А вот это сувениры из Америки.]
John: I ya ochen’ rad s vami paznakomitsa. A vot eta suveniry iz Ameriki.
Ольга: [Спасибо большое! Садитесь Джон, угощайтесь. А где ваша семья?]
Olga: Spasibo bol’shoe! Sadites’ John. ugoshchyaytes’. A gde vasha sem’ya?
Джон: [Родители живут в Калорадо, сестра в Калифорнии, брат в Нью-Йорке. Ну а я в Мичигане.]
John: Raditeli v Kaloroda, sestra v Kalifornii, brat v N’yu-Yorke. Nu a ya v Michigane.
Ольга: [О, у вас большая семья.]
Olga: O. u vas bal’shaya sem’ya.
Джон: [Да, у меня есть фотография, вот...]
John: Da, u menya est’ fatagrafiya, vot...

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello RussianPod101 listeners!

Do you get nervous when meeting someone else's family for the first time?

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RussianPod101.com
Friday at 8:53 am
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Hello Catherine B,


Thank you! We will fix it.


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

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Catherine B
Tuesday at 4:49 pm
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Kindly change:

And his [unintelligible 00:46:25] was:

to

And his natural answer was

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 5:07 pm
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Hello Mary G,


Your sentence is great :thumbsup:


"Да, я немножко нервничаю, когда я встречаю чью-то семью впервые".


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

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Mary G.
Wednesday at 11:51 pm
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Yes, I get a little nervous when I meet someone's family for the first time.

Да, я немножка нервничала когда я встречаю кому-то семью впервые

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RussianPod101.com
Tuesday at 9:15 am
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Hello Michael,


Thank you for letting us know.

Yes, the preposition C ("with") should be used with the instrumental case.

We already fix it.

Regards,

Svetlana

Team RussianPod101.com

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Michael
Wednesday at 11:39 am
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At the bottom of page 10 of the Lesson notes, you write:


"The preposition we'll use with the genitive case is s (C), meaning "with."


You do mean *Instrumental*, right?