Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Oxana: [Всем привер, я Оксана.]
Eddie: Eddie here. Gengo Russian Season 1, Lesson 12. Get where you need to go with a mobile language partner. So, little does he know yet, but John is soon to find that taxi drivers can be your best friends.
Oxana: Well, best friends with cars, yes. Not that many friends of mine in Russia have cars.
Eddie: Yes, that is good in a friend. However, what I mean is that they’re like captive language partners. Captive, totally bored out of their minds, behind a wheel for hours on end and ready to chat.
Oxana: Well, before, when people in Russia were more curious and talkative in general and they didn’t care about the personal territory of another person, everything was common, remember? Your territory is my territory.
Eddie: Right. I’ve heard that good service in Russia is considered to be invisible, totally unnoticeable service. So if you take a high class taxi, all you can count on is some light music and a totally silent driver.
Oxana: Right. But if you catch a private care, which can be done in seconds by raising your hand on the road side, you can have some chat but mostly bargaining about the price.
Eddie: Well, I assume the taxi he took by the hotel is a high class one with a meter at least. But let’s count on John privilege of being a foreigner and a driver’s curiosity.
Oxana: Right. And there is so much John can talk to him about.
Eddie: Discussing the weather, for example.
Oxana: [Сегодня тепло и солнечно.] or [Будет дождь].
Eddie: “It’s warm and sunny today” or “It will rain”. He can also grouch about the exchange rate.
Oxana: [Плохой курс валют.]
Eddie: “Bad exchange rate.” But let’s see what he’s really going to talk about today. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Джон: [Здравсрвуйте! До Проспекта Мира, пожалуйса.]
John: Zdravstvuite! Do Prospekta Mira, pozhaluista.
Водитель: [До станции метро?]
Driver: Do stantsii metro?
Джон: [Вот, у меня есть конкретный адрес. ]
John: Vot, u menya est’ konktetnyi adres.
Водитель: [А, бизнес центр, понятно. Вы не из России? ]
Driver: A, biznes centr, ponyatno. Vy ne iz Rossii?
Джон: [Нет, я из Америки, только вчера прилетел.]
John: Net, ya iz Ameriki, tol’ko vchera priletel.
Водитель: [У вас бизнес в Москве?]
Driver: U vas biznes v Moskve?
Джон: [Ну, можно и так сказать.]
John: Nu, mozhno i tak skazat’.
Водитель: [Приехали. С вас 450 рублей. Вам нужен чек?]
Driver: Priehali. S vas chetyrestapyut’desyat rublei. Vam nuzhen chek?
Джон: [Да, пожалуйста. Вот 450 рублей.]
John: Da, pozhaluista. Vot chetyrestapyut’desyat rublei.
Водитель: [Будте осторожны в Москве. Удачи!]
Driver: Budte ostorozhny v Moskve. Udachi!
Джон: [Спасибо, вам тоже.]
John: Spasibo, vam tozhe.
Eddie: Once again, slowly.
Oxana: Ещё раз, медленнее.
Джон: [Здравсрвуйте! До Проспекта Мира, пожалуйса.]
John: Zdravstvuite! Do Prospekta Mira, pozhaluista.
Водитель: [До станции метро?]
Driver: Do stantsii metro?
Джон:[Вот, у меня есть конкретный адрес. ]
John: Vot, u menya est’ konktetnyi adres.
Водитель: [А, бизнес центр, понятно. Вы не из России? ]
Driver: A, biznes centr, ponyatno. Vy ne iz Rossii?
Джон: [Нет, я из Америки, только вчера прилетел.]
John: Net, ya iz Ameriki, tol’ko vchera priletel.
Водитель: [У вас бизнес в Москве?]
Driver: U vas biznes v Moskve?
Джон: [Ну, можно и так сказать.]
John: Nu, mozhno i tak skazat’.
Водитель: [Приехали. С вас 450 рублей. Вам нужен чек?]
Driver: Priehali. S vas chetyrestapyut’desyat rublei. Vam nuzhen chek?
Джон: [Да, пожалуйста. Вот 450 рублей.]
John: Da, pozhaluista. Vot chetyrestapyut’desyat rublei.
Водитель: [Будьте осторожны в Москве. Удачи!]
Driver: Bud’te ostorozhny v Moskve. Udachi!
Джон: [Спасибо, вам тоже.]
John: Spasibo, vam tozhe.
Eddie: Once again, slowly.
Oxana: Ещё раз, медленнее.
Eddie: Once again, with the translation.
Oxana: Ещё раз, с переводом.
Oxana: [Здравсрвуйте! До Проспекта Мира, пожалуйса.]
Eddie: Hello. To Peace Avenue, please.
Oxana:[До станции метро?]
Eddie: The metro station?
Oxana: [Вот, у меня есть конкретный адрес. ]
Eddie: Here I have the exact address.
Oxana: [А, бизнес центр, понятно. Вы не из России? ]
Eddie: Oh, the business center. Got it. You’re not from Russia, are you?
Oxana: [Нет, я из Америки, только вчера прилетел.]
Eddie: No, I'm from America. I came here just yesterday.
Oxana: [У вас бизнес в Москве?]
Eddie: Do you have some business in Moscow?
Oxana: [Ну, можно и так сказать.]
Eddie: Well, you could put it that way.
Oxana: [Приехали. С вас 450 рублей. Вам нужен чек?]
Eddie: We’re here. 450 rubles. Do you need a receipt?
Oxana: [Да, пожалуйста. Вот 450 рублей.]
Eddie:Yes, please. Here, 450 rubles.
Oxana: [Будьте осторожны в Москве. Удачи!]
Eddie:Be careful in Moscow. Good luck.
Oxana:[Спасибо, вам тоже.]
Eddie:Thanks, you too.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eddie: So, a trick of the trade.
Oxana: What’s that, Eddie?
Eddie: Always, always get someone or write yourself the address in Russian.
Oxana: Yeah, well, if you can. It’s better to be safe than sorry.
Eddie: And this isn’t necessarily a language thing only. I mean the cities in Russia are huge. Having a concrete street name written down for the drivers really takes away some taxi anxiety for newbies. The Мир Avenue, for example, can mean both the subway station and the Avenue itself with has several streets and stations on it.
Oxana: Very good tip, Eddie.
Eddie: So the taxi man has the address. Let’s look at the rest and see what we can learn.
VOCAB LIST
Eddie: Let’s look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Oxana: [проспект]
Eddie: Avenue, boulevard.
Oxana:[проспект]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [конкретный]
Eddie: Concrete, specific, exact.
Oxana:[конкретный]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [бизнес центр]
Eddie: Business center.
Oxana: [бизнес центр]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [только]
Eddie: Only, just.
Oxana: [только]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [вчера]
Eddie: Yesterday.
Oxana:[вчера]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [прилететь]
Eddie: To come or arrive by plane.
Oxana:[прилететь]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[можно]
Eddie: Can, allow to.
Oxana:[можно]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [и]
Eddie:And.
Oxana: [и]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [так]
Eddie:Like this, this way.
Oxana: [так]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[приехать]
Eddie: To come, arrive by transport.
Oxana:[приехать]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [с вас]
Eddie: “That’ll be” - talking about money.
Oxana: [с вас]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[нужный]
Eddie: Necessary, needed.
Oxana: [нужный]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[чек]
Eddie: Receipt, bill.
Oxana:[чек]
Eddie:Next.
Oxana:[Будьте осторожны.]
Eddie: “Be careful” - polite form.
Oxana: [Будьте осторожны.]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [тоже]
Eddie:To, also.
Oxana: [тоже]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: So, as we can see, John and the driver manage to build a decent conversation.
Oxana:Yes, the trigger for it was obviously John’s accent. It aroused the cabbie’s curiosity.
Eddie: That happened a bit later, but first they had a very normal driver-passenger talk. Where was the place John told him to go?
Oxana: [До Проспекта Мира]
Eddie: Literally, “until the Mira Avenue”. [Проспект] is usually a name for a broad street in Russia and usually in downtown. [Мир] has two meaning, “world” and “peace”. It would have been too big and ambitious to call the street the World Avenue, wouldn’t it? Anyway, here it means “Peace Avenue”. It was named like this in the ‘50s, a relatively peaceful time for Russia after the war. Relatively.
Oxana: Yeah, and do you remember why both [проспект] and [мир] change their endings when used with [до], “until”? Take a look back at lesson 8, it’s all explained there.
Eddie:Give us the whole phrase again, Axanna?
Oxana:[До Проспекта Мира, пожалуйста.]
Eddie: Great. But the taxi driver is confused whether to go to the subway station called [Проспект Мира] or whichever part of the avenue itself. So here he asks…
Oxana: [До станции метро? ]
Eddie: This must have sounded like music from your childhood to you, something you know so well that it makes you smile.
Oxana:Right. This was one of the first phrases John said when he stepped on Russian land. [До станции метро?] But the first time it was [Тверская, remember?
Eddie: Yeah, so knowing that you’d assume John would have no problems answering the driver’s question, but now it’s his turn to get confused. Who could ‘ve imagined that [Проспект Мита] would mean different things to the cabbie.
Oxana: And from the sound [Аа], we can definitely say that John is puzzled.
Eddie: But here goes the phrase that saves his time and money, as well as the drive’s nerves.
Oxana:[Вот, у меня есть конкретный адрес.]
Eddie:“Here, I have the exact address.” We know the word [вот], “here”, and we know [у меня есть], “I have”.
Oxana: And then we have the words you will have minimum problems remembering, [конкретный адрес]. [конкретный] has the exact same meaning as the English “concrete” or “exact”, “specific”. This is one of those cases when you squeeze Russian grammar into a foreign word. In our case is the ending [ый], which indicates that it’s an adjective and put on a heavy Russian accent.
Eddie:Then we hear another [Аа] here, but this time with the intonation of understanding.
Oxana: [А, бизнес центр, понятно.]
Eddie: “Oh, the business center. Got it.” No new words for us here. “Business center” in English differs from “business center” in Russian only by accent and [понятно] is the word we learned so profoundly in the previous lesson. So the driver got a clear idea of where he’s supposed to go. It’s time to chat.
Oxana:[Вы не из России?]
Eddie: Literally “You’re not from Russia?” The question sounds exactly like the English “You’re not from Russia, are you?” where the guy is pretty positive about John not being Russian, but to be on the safe side choses this manner of asking.
Oxana: Yeah, well, it’s basically a modest way to ask where he’s from, right?
Eddie: Well, of course his question doesn’t assume the mono-syllabic answer.
Oxana: So he says [Нет, я из Америки].
Eddie: “No, I'm from America.” A well-known phrase to use learned in some of the first lessons. So obviously he wants the conversation to get going, so he adds…
Oxana: [Только вчера прилетел.]
Eddie:Literally “just came yesterday”. The word [только] has the same meanings and usage as the English “just”. The primary meaning of it is to show that there is a single one or very few of something or that there are no others. Can you give us some examples, Axanna?
Oxana: Sure. [Только я.]
Eddie: Just me. Only me.
Oxana: [Только пять рублей.]
Eddie: Only 5 rubles.
Oxana: Another meaning of [только] can be translated as “just” or “simply”, and it’s also used to reduce the force of a statement and to suggest that it’s not very important. [Я только посмотрю.]
Eddie:I’ll just take a look.
Oxana: [Я только приехал.]
Eddie: I’ve just arrived.
Oxana: Yeah, so just remember [только] is the English “just”, “only”, “simply”, and use it in all the same situations as you’d use these English words.
Eddie:Then we have the word for “yesterday”. We already know the words for “today” and “tomorrow”.
Oxana: [Сегодня/завтра.]
Eddie: Now it’s time to learn to talk about your past experiences.
Oxana:Wait, we already know something about the past like [На прошлой неделе.], “last week”.
Eddie:That’s right. Look, to avoid confusion, let’s review all the time indicator that we’ve learned.
Oxana: [Завтра]
Eddie: Tomorrow.
Oxana:[Скоро]
Eddie: Soon.
Oxana: [Сейчас]
Eddie: Now.
Oxana:[Сегодня]
Eddie:Today.
Oxana:[Неделю назад]
Eddie: A week ago.
Oxana: [После обеда]
Eddie:“In the afternoon.” We’ve also learned the days of the week and how to tell the time. And now, finally, the word for “yesterday”.
Oxana:[Вчера]
Eddie: [Вчера] And, of course, it requires the past tense. So what did he do [вчера]?
Oxana: [Прилетел]
Eddie:Arrived or came by plane. If he somehow managed to come to Moscow by car, by bus or by another other kind of public transport, we’d say…
Oxana: [Приехал]
Eddie:And if he came on foot. Even if he could, would Moscow be really worth it?
Oxana:Ok, let’s say hypothetically he did come on foot, so we should say [пришёл]. So once again, [прилетел].
Eddie: Came by plane.
Oxana:[Приехал]
Eddie:Came by any kind of road transport.
Oxana:[Пришел]
Eddie: “Came on foot.” So the driver got the impression that John is open for conversation, and here’s his next question.
Oxana:[У вас бизнес в Москве?]
Eddie: “Do you have business in Moscow?”
Oxana:The question you’ll be hearing a lot in Russia. Well, if you’re not dressed like a backpacker and don’t wonder around with a grin on your face, waving your camera right and left.
Eddie: So let’s break down this phrase. [бизнес в Москве] Shouldn’t be a problem for you. “Business in Moscow.” Then we have [у вас]. This is just a cut version of [у вас есть], “do you have”, which we heard when [Елена] asked John about the warm clothes when he landed.
Oxana: Right. There are cases when you can just drop [есть]. On this level of learning Russian, you can use [у вас есть/ у меня есть] just to be on the safe side. And later, when you get a better feeling of the language, you can leave out [есть] in some cases and just say [и меня/ у вас].
Eddie: Just one quick tip. You should use [есть] when the possession is emphasized like [У вас есть телефон?]. “Do you have a phone?” When the possession is not the key in the sentence, but the subject or the fact is, as in [У меня выходной], “I have a day off”, you can drop [есть].
Oxana:Right. So once again, [У вас бизнес в Москве?].
Eddie: And here comes the integrating part. John has probably heard all the horror stories about Russian mafia, Moscow skinheads and Russian street robberies, so he’s suspicious of anyone who asks him about his business. We advise him not to lose his vigilance, but taking extreme care is also not needed nowadays. In our case, he doesn’t want to share his business affairs with the taxi driver, and he knows that the answer “yes” will be followed by another question like “what kind”. So what word solution did he find, Axanna?
Oxana:A very good phrase when you want to softly avoid the topic and further question. [Ну, можно и так сказать.] which is “Well, you can put it that way”.
Eddie: [Ну] can be translated as a hesitant “well” here, but you’ll hear a lot more of it in Russia. Even when you think its usage is totally inappropriate. It’s like the English “like” which people sometimes put every second word when they can’t build a phrase properly. So don’t use it too much. Of course, it won’t show the lack of education in your because you’re a foreigner, but it can be a little bit irritating for a listener. Ok, the next word.
Oxana: [Можно] Do you remember the word [разрешите], “allow me”, in the airplane conversation? Well, [можно] is kind of similar to it, just a little bit more colloquial.
Eddie:Literally it means “can”, “ok to”, “allowed”. Yeah, I think “it’s ok to” or “is it ok to” would be the most appropriate ones.
Oxana:When you want to ask “is it ok to” meaning if you are allowed to do something, start your conversation with [можно] like [можно курить?], “Is it ok to smoke?”
Eddie: But in our case, it’s not a question or permission to do something. It’s part of the idiomatic phrase, but still we can break it into words. So here we go. The next one is…
Oxana: [и] which means “and” as in [я и ты], “me and you”.
Eddie:[Эдди и пиво] “Eddie and beer.”
Oxana:And what good can possible come out of that combo. Ok, next. [так]
Eddie: [так] means “like this”, “in this way”. It’s easy to remember it in pair with [как], “how”.
Oxana: Right, [как - так] “How? Like this.”
Eddie: And the last word in the phrase was [сказать], “to say”, which you must remember from the boot camp lessons. So now, after we broke the phrase down, just remember it as it is and use it whenever you want to turn down someone’s curiosity.
Oxana:[Можно и так сказать.]
Eddie: Ok, so the driver got the hint and was probably silent for most of the way. Finally, he said…
Oxana:[Приехали]
Eddie: Which means “arrived”, “came” if you used transport.
Oxana: But in this case it’s used in plural with the ending [ли]. “We came”.
Eddie:Let’s conjugate this verb according to person and number.
Oxana: [Он приехал.]
Eddie: He came.
Oxana:[Она приехала.]
Eddie:
She came.
Oxana: [Они] or [ мы приехали].
Eddie:“They” or “we came”. Next.
Oxana: [С вас 450 рублей.]
Eddie: “That’ll be 450 rubles.” [с вас] literally means “from you”. It’s used as a less formal version of [пожалуйста], usually in shops and taxis, but not in high class hotels and restaurants. So John could’ve heard either [450 рублей пожалуйста] or [с вас 450 рублей]. Next.
Oxana:[Вам нужен чек?]
Eddie:[Вам] means “to you”, right?
Oxana:Yes, it’s the pronoun [вы] in the dative case.
Eddie: What about [нужен]?
Oxana:That’s a good word. Sometimes it’s translated as the adjective “necessary”, sometimes as the word “need”.
Eddie: And the last word was [чек]. Pretty obvious, right? It means “a receipt”, “a bill” or “a check”.
Oxana: Which you are given in a restaurant is also [чек]. So when it’s time to pay for your meal, you say [Чек, пожалуйста].
Eddie: The last words taxi driver said before he set off…
Oxana: [Будьте осторожны в Москве. Удачи.]
Eddie:“Be careful in Moscow. Good luck. Be prepared.” Lots of people will tell you that in Moscow because they’re all convinced that it’s deadly dangerous to be a foreigner in their country. They think that foreigners are naïve and too open hearted, probably because we smile a lot, so they’ll scold you for your friendliness to others. But let’s break down the phrase.
Oxana:[Будьте] is a command form of the verb “to be”. If you drop the ending [те] you’ll make it sound less formal. [осторожный] means “careful”. [в Москве] means “in Moscow”, you got that. And [удачи] is also something we’ve learned before and it means “good luck”.
Eddie:And John’s answer…
Oxana:[Спасибо, вам тоже.]
Eddie: You too. Remember the conversation between Elena and John when they were parting and exchanging addresses? He was telling her he was happy to get to know her. And she said [мне тоже], “to me too”. So here we change [мне], “to me”, into [вам], “to you”, and add our well-known [тоже], “to”. Ok, let’s get to the grammar now.
LESSON FOCUS
Eddie: Let’s listen to the words we’ll be talking about today.
Oxana:
[Нужен. осторожны]
Eddie:These are the short adjectives. Yes, there are two types of adjectives in Russian: normal and short. Normal adjectives are those that you’re already familiar with from the ninth lesson such as…
Oxana: [Новый]
Eddie:New.
Oxana: [Красивое]
Eddie: Beautiful.
Oxana: [Маленькое]
Eddie:Small.
Oxana: [Большие]
Eddie: Big.
Eddie:Usually, these adjectives are put before nouns to describe them.
Oxana: [Новый дом.]
Eddie: New house (masculine).
Oxana: [Красивая улица.]
Eddie:Beautiful street (feminine).
Oxana:[Маленькое здание.]
Eddie:Small building (neutral).
Oxana:[Большие глаза.]
Eddie: “Big eyes” (plural). The second type of Russian adjectives is the short form. There’s no such form in English, but the usage is very similar with English adjectives. Most often the short form is used to make a statement about something. In English, it normally follows the word “is” or “are”. For example, “You are funny” and “He is handsome”. Notice that the adjective is not followed by a noun. The use of the short form is generally limited to simple sentences.
Oxana:[Ты смешна.]
Eddie:You’re funny.
Oxana:[Он очень красив.]
Eddie:He’s very handsome.
Oxana: [Будь осторожен.]
Eddie:Be careful.
Oxana: [Они мне дороги.]
Eddie:“They’re precious to me.” Not all adjectives can have a short form but most do. For example, the words that describe nationalities or languages don’t. [Русский] Russian, [Английский] English and [Немецкий] German. Short adjectives don’t have case changes, but they should still agree in gender with the noun.
Oxana: To make them agree with the masculine nouns just use the stem of the adjectives in the short form. [Красивый - красив] With feminine nouns add [а] to the stem of the adjective. [Красива] With neutral add [о] to the adjective stem. [Красиво] Plurals need [ы] or [и] added to the stems [красивы].
Eddie:So, once again, when you describe a noun, I mean put the adjective before the noun, use the full form of the adjective. When you make short sentences like “she’s cute” or “be careful”, use the short form of the adjective and don’t put a noun after it.
Oxana: Next we have the word [нужный], “necessary”, “need”.
Eddie:This word has a very peculiar usage or rather interesting variations of the English translation. Can you give us some examples?
Oxana: [Нужный документ.]
Eddie: Necessary document (masculine).
Oxana:[Нужная информация.]
Eddie: Necessary information (feminine).
Oxana:[Нужное слово.]
Eddie: Necessary word (neutral).
Oxana: [Нужные вещи.]
Eddie:“Necessary things” (plural). In this case, the normal or full adjective [нужный] in Russian is equivalent to the English adjective “necessary”. Just like in English, it’s most often followed by a noun and it described this noun. Now take a look at another set of examples in which we use the short form of [нужный].
Oxana:[Мне нужен документ.]
Eddie: I need a document.
Oxana:[Ты мне нужна.]
Eddie:I need you.
Oxana: [Мне нужно домой.]
Eddie: I need to go home.
Oxana:[Мне не нужны эти вещи.]
Eddie: “I don’t need these things.” In this case, the short form of the Russian adjective [нужный], “necessary”, becomes the verb “need” in the English translation. It’s usually followed by a noun, but serving as a verb, it doesn’t describe it. Or a verb when you talk about the necessity to do something. The first sentence we translated is “I need a document” although if we translated it literally, it would sound as “to me necessary document”. The second sentence was “you necessary to me”. The third one, “to me necessary home”. And the last one, “to me not necessary these things.” Note that when you talk about the necessity to do something as in “I need to”, you need the short form of the verb [нужный] in neutral gender. Some examples, please, Axanna.
Oxana: [Мне нужно поменять деньги.]
Eddie: I need to change money.
Oxana: [Мне нужно купить подарок.]
Eddie:I need to buy a present.
Oxana:[Мне нужно на Тверскую.]
Eddie: I need to get to Tverskaya.
Oxana: [Мне нужно домой.]
OUTRO
Eddie: “I need to go home.” Remember, when you talk about the locations you need to go to you can omit the words “to go” or “to get”, just like in the last two examples. That just about does it for today.
Oxana: [До свидания!]
Eddie: [Пока!]
--
Джон: [Здравсрвуйте! До Проспекта Мира, пожалуйса.]
John: Zdravstvuite! Do Prospekta Mira, pozhaluista.
Водитель: [До станции метро?]
Driver: Do stantsii metro?
Джон: [Вот, у меня есть конкретный адрес. ]
John: Vot, u menya est’ konktetnyi adres.
Водитель: [А, бизнес центр, понятно. Вы не из России? ]
Driver: A, biznes centr, ponyatno. Vy ne iz Rossii?
Джон: [Нет, я из Америки, только вчера прилетел.]
John: Net, ya iz Ameriki, tol’ko vchera priletel.
Водитель: [У вас бизнес в Москве?]
Driver: U vas biznes v Moskve?
Джон: [Ну, можно и так сказать.]
John: Nu, mozhno i tak skazat’.
Водитель: [Приехали. С вас 450 рублей. Вам нужен чек?]
Driver: Priehali. S vas chetyrestapyut’desyat rublei. Vam nuzhen chek?
Джон: [Да, пожалуйста. Вот 450 рублей.]
John: Da, pozhaluista. Vot chetyrestapyut’desyat rublei.
Водитель: [Будте осторожны в Москве. Удачи!]
Driver: Budte ostorozhny v Moskve. Udachi!
Джон: [Спасибо, вам тоже.]
John: Spasibo, vam tozhe.

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