Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Oxana: [Всем привет!]
Eddie: Eddie here. Gengo Russian Season 1, Lesson 10. How to stay in style in Russia. Hello and welcome back to RussianPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Russian. I'm joined in the studio by…
Oxana: Hello, everyone. Oxanna here.
Eddie: Well, our fellow travelers making his way quite well in the world, Axanna.
Oxana: Yes. Just shows you what a little Russian can do for you.
Eddie: It can get you to a Russian hotel in one piece.
Oxana:But just so you get to your Russian hotel in one piece, we’re going to review what we learned in the last lesson for a moment.
Eddie: Yeah, come to think of it, Russian not only gets you to the hotel in one piece, it will also stop you starving to death.
Oxana: Because John was able to make some purchases in the convenient store.
Eddie: He got some water.
Oxana:[вода]
Eddie: Some cookies.
Oxana: [печенье]
Eddie: Some milk.
Oxana: [молоко]
Eddie: And even a few batteries.
Oxana:[батарейки]
Eddie: I'm sure everything except for the batteries was very [вкусно].
Oxana: Yes, well, not sure about [вкусно] “delicious” in the convenient store.
Eddie: But like we said, at least he got something fresh.
Oxana: Yes. [свежие булочки]
Eddie: Yes. And now, as promised, John arrives at his hotel in one piece.
Oxana: I'm sure the bed will feel great. Let’s hear how he manages.
Eddie: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Джон: [Здравствуйте, неделю назад я заброниривал номер в этом отеле. ]
John: Zdravstvuite, nedelyu nazad ya zabroniroval nomer v etom otele.
Девушка: [Ваше полное имя пожалуйста.]
Woman: Vashe polnoe imya pozhaliuista.
Джон: [Джон Янг, вот мой паспорт.]
John: John Young, vot moi pasport.
Девушка: [Номер 501, пятый этаж, вот ключи.]
Woman: Nomer 501, pyatyi etazh, vot klyuchi.
Джон:[Скажите, в номере есть беспроводной интернет?]
John: Skazhite, v nomere est’ besprovodnoi internet?
Девушка: [Есть.]
Woman: Est’
Джон:[А во сколько завтрак?]
John: A vo skol’ko zavtrak?
Девушка: [С 6 утра.]
Woman: S shesti utra.
Eddie: Once again, slowly.
Oxana: Ещё раз, медленнее.
Джон: [Здравствуйте, неделю назад я заброниривал номер в этом отеле. ]
John: Zdravstvuite, nedelyu nazad ya zabroniroval nomer v etom otele.
Девушка: [Ваше полное имя пожалуйста.]
Woman: Vashe polnoe imya pozhaliuista.
Джон: [Джон Янг, вот мой паспорт.]
John: John Young, vot moi pasport.
Девушка: [Номер 501, пятый этаж, вот ключи.]
Woman: Nomer 501, pyatyi etazh, vot klyuchi.
Джон:[Скажите, в номере есть беспроводной интернет?]
John: Skazhite, v nomere est’ besprovodnoi internet?
Девушка: [Есть.]
Woman: Est’
Джон: [А во сколько завтрак?]
John: A vo skol’ko zavtrak?
Девушка: [С 6 утра.]
Woman: S shesti utra.
Eddie: Once again, at natural speed with the translation.
Oxana: Ещё раз, с переводом.
Oxana: [Здравствуйте, неделю назад я заброниривал номер в этом отеле. ]
Eddie: Hello. I reserved a room in this hotel a week ago.
Oxana:[Ваше полное имя пожалуйста.]
Eddie: Your full name, please.
Oxana: [Джон Янг, вот мой паспорт.]
Eddie:John Young. Here’s my passport.
Oxana: [Номер 501, пятый этаж, вот ключи.]
Eddie: Room 501, fifth floor. Here are your keys.
Oxana: [Скажите, в номере есть беспроводной интернет?]
Eddie:Excuse me, is there wireless internet in the room?
Oxana: [Есть.]
Eddie: Yes, there is.
Oxana: [А во сколько завтрак?]
Eddie: And what time is breakfast.
Oxana:[С 6 утра.]
Eddie: From six in the morning.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eddie: In Russia, in bigger cities, you can generally find any price range and quality of hotel from five star down to hostels. On the other hand, when you get to some of the smaller cities, at the top of the scale luxury hotels may be nonexistent. And at the bottom of the scale cleanliness can be an issue. Therefore, it’s safe to say in a bigger city one can find lots of choices. However, in a smaller area choices may not be as plentiful. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Oxana: [неделю назад]
Eddie: A week ago.
Oxana: [неделю назад]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [бронировать]
Eddie: To reserve book.
Oxana: [бронировать]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [номер]
Eddie: Number, hotel room.
Oxana: [номер]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [этот]
Eddie: This.
Oxana: [этот]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [полное имя]
Eddie: Full name.
Oxana:[полное имя]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[этаж]
Eddie:Floor.
Oxana:[этаж]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[ключ]
Eddie:Key.
Oxana: [ключ]
Eddie:Next.
Oxana:[беспроводной интернет]
Eddie:Wireless internet.
Oxana:[беспроводной интернет]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana:[завтрак]
Eddie:Breakfast.
Oxana: [завтрак]
Eddie: Next.
Oxana: [с]
Eddie: With, starting from.
Oxana: [с]
Eddie:Next.
Oxana: [утро]
Eddie: Morning.
Oxana: [утро]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: Well, here you have it again. We told you.
Oxana: [Здравствуйте!]
Eddie: Yes.
Oxana:Well, there is a great new word we can learn since the [Здравствуйте!] is officially cemented in our minds.
Eddie: Yes, John has [забронировал], “a room”.
Oxana: Yes. In Russian, to reserve is [бронировать].
Eddie: As we know from lesson number 7, Russian verbs can be divided into two categories: perfective and imperfective. Or in other words, those that indicate that the act was completed successfully and those that indicate the ongoing process. How do we put a verb from one category into the other? By adding or dropping prefixes.
Oxana: So the dictionary form of the verb “reserve” will be [бронировать].
Eddie: But John reserved a room a week ago, so the act is pretty much completed. What do we do with the verb in that case?
Oxana:We add a prefix [за] and get [забронировать].
Eddie: Now we have to put our verb in the past tense and coordinate it with the gender.
Oxana:Well, the past tense for Russian verbs is pretty easy. We take the dictionary form for the verb, drop the ending [ть] and replace it with the following endings: [л] for masculine verbs in the past as in [забронировал], the ending [ла] for feminine verbs, [забронировала], and [ло] for neutral verbs, [забраниравало]. It’s hard to imagine this kind of situation with something booking a hotel, but we have some grammatical rules and they’re applicable for any kind of situation. And the last change we can make with this verb is putting it into the plural by adding the ending [ли] leading to [забронировали].
Eddie: You might have gotten confused by all these [ла, ло, ли] endings. So for better understanding and systematizing it in your head, we advise you to read our PDF materials. And it will be better to read them more than once. Ok, let’s make it clear about when John reserved a room.
Oxana: [неделю назад]
Eddie: A week ago. The dictionary form of the word “week” is [неделя] and the word [назад] literally means “back”. In lesson 5 we mentioned that the days of the week should always be put into the accusative case when you talk about them as the time indicating an event, like “on Monday”. So here’s good news for you, the week itself should also be put into the accusative case. This is how we get the word [неделю].
Oxana:And the word [назад], with its literal meaning of “bag”, can be used in the same situations the English advert “back” but in combination with time it changes its meaning to “ago” as in “a week ago”.
Eddie: We learned the word “hour” earlier, so if I want to say “an hour ago” do I just say [час назад]?
Oxana: Absolutely right. [час назад. Два дня назад.]
Eddie: Two days ago.
Oxana:[Год назада.]
Eddie:“A year ago.” Great. So [неделю назад забронировал]. What?
Oxana: [номер]
Eddie: Sounds very familiar but I'm confused. Doesn’t it mean “a number”?
Oxana:It definitely does but it also means a room in a hotel. The rooms are called “numbers” simply because all of them have numbers. And what you get in a hotel is a room number first, right?
Eddie:Very logical explanation. Ok, so “number” is a hotel room. I hope internet doesn’t mean anything like “cucumber” in Russian.
Oxana: Eddie, Russian can be ridiculous as well as the Russians themselves but only to a degree. And [интернет] will mean “internet” in our dialogue.
Eddie:That actually makes me feel better. At least I can concentrate on just one word today and learn how to say “number” meaning “room”. Ok, so where did John book his room?
Oxana:In the hotel he’s in now. So [в этом отеле], “in this hotel”.
Eddie:The dictionary form of the word “hotel” is…
Oxana:[отель]
EDDIE:
But obviously we have to put it into our well-known locative case, also called the prepositional case because we have a preposition here, right?
Oxana: Yes, one of the three prepositions that tells us to use the prepositional case. [в], “in”, as in [в отеле].
Eddie: The word [это] means “this” but you know that we have to make everything agree with a noun, including the pronouns. That’s how we got [этом]. Next we hear the receptionist.
Oxana:[ваше полное имя]
Eddie:[имя], “name”, is neutral so the pronoun “your” and the adjective “full” have to agree with it in gender. [ваше] and [полное].
Oxana: It’s a common question in Russia because, unlike in English, all names including the middle name are frequently used in Russia and are absolutely necessary for the documents. The receptionist might not expect to hear a middle name from a foreigner, but it’s her job to ask the question. For John it would just mean his first and last names.
Eddie: John says his name and, expecting the front desk staff not to catch onto it, has his passport prepared.
Oxana:[вот мой паспорт]
Eddie: “Here’s my passport.” No new words except for one which sound identical to English, “passport”. What happens next? Does the receptionist let John in his room?
Oxana: Yes, she says [номер 501, пятый этаж].
Eddie: “Number 501” or “Room 501” it doesn’t make any difference here, although everyone knows that the first digits always stand for the floor number. The staff member usually wants to make sure you don’t get lost or may just predicts and prevents your next question by saying which floor your room is on.
Oxana: In our case it’s [пятый этаж].
Eddie: [этаж] in Russian means “floor” but [пятый]?
Oxana: What? Come on, don’t sound so scared. You also have ordinal numbers in English, like first, second and third, which sound nothing like one, two and three. In Russian, you can always figure out the meaning of the ordinal number if you know the simple cardinal numbers. For example [пятый] comes form the number [пять].
Eddie: Can you give us some more examples with ordinal numbers, Axanna?
Oxana: I’ll give you ten. First [первый]. Second [второй]. Third [третий]. Fourth [четвёртый]. Fifth [пятый]. Sixth [шестой]. Seventh [седьмой]. Eighth [восьмой]. Ninth [девятый ]. Tenth [десятый].
Eddie: There are only seven floors in the hotel John is trying to get into so he’s almost on top. We don’t need more numbers for now. Don’t forget to check our pdf materials for more explanations and examples. There was something John wanted to know about the room facilities.
Oxana: [в номере есть беспроводной интернет?]
Eddie: Literally, “in room there is wireless internet?” The word [есть] stands for “there is” or “there are” in English. We’ve heard it before in sentences like [у вас есть] and [у меня есть] where it means the verb “to have”. So here’s good news for you. “There is”, “there are” and “have” have only one equivalent in Russian - [есть].
Oxana: In most cases. Also, we should remember that the word order doesn’t change in Russian when you want to form a question. It’s the intonation that makes a big difference. Listen to this sentence which I will say twice with different intonations. [в номере есть беспроводной интернет?]
Eddie:Is there wireless internet in the room?
Oxana: [в номере есть беспроводной интернет]
Eddie:“There is wireless internet in the room.” The first one is a question, just as we had in our dialogue, and the second one is a statement. So be careful with your voice, you might confuse the Russians with the wrong intonation. Also, let’s give our listeners more examples with the word [есть] so they can understand the usage of it in the meanings “have” and “there is”.
Oxana:[В комнате есть кондиционер.]
Eddie: There’s an air conditioner in the room.
Oxana:[В городе есть рестораны. ]
Eddie: There are restaurant in the city.
Oxana: [У меня есть телефон.]
Eddie: I have a phone.
Oxana:[У него есть две собаки.]
Eddie: “He has two dogs.” Great. Now what was the word for “wireless”? Luckily we don’t have to explain “internet”.
Oxana: Wireless sounds like [беспрободной ] in Russian. [провод] is “wire”. The prefix [бес] literally means “without” and the ending is typical for a masculine adjective.
Eddie: [беспрободной] Ok, got it. So is there wireless internet in John’s room?
Oxana: [Есть] which means “has” or “there is”. You might as well hear [да] in response but [есть] is a common positive reply to questions like “is there” or “do you have”?
Eddie: Ok. Is there anything else John is interested in?
Oxana:Yes, like every man he is concerned about meals. So here he’s asking [Во сколько завтрак?].
Eddie: And what time is breakfast?
Oxana: We know the question [во сколько], right? “What time?” So the new word for you will be [завтрак]. I'm not sure if lunches and dinners are included in the hotel fee, but if you want to ask the staff here are the words you’ll need. [обед]
Eddie: Lunch.
Oxana: And [ужин].
Eddie:“Dinner”. Ok, and what time is his [завтрак]?
Oxana: [С шести утра.]
Eddie: [С] literally means “starting from” or “since” and refers to time. The nouns, adjectives and numerals have to be put into the genitive case after this preposition. In our case, we have a noun, [утро] and a number, [шесть]. After modifying them according to the genitive case, we’re getting…
Oxana:[шести утра]
Eddie: Check our PDF file to get the system down, and for now just listen to some more examples.
Oxana:[С пяти утра.]
Eddie: From 5 AM.
Oxana:[С шести утра.]
Eddie: From 6 AM.
Oxana:[С семи утра.]
Eddie: From 7 o’clock in the morning.
Oxana: [С восьми вечера.]
Eddie: From 8 PM.
Oxana:[С девяти вечера.]
Eddie: From 9 PM.
Oxana:[С десяти вечера. ]
Eddie: “From 10 PM”. Note that “of morning” and “of evening” is used in the context of “before noon” and “after noon” in Russian or just AM and PM.
Oxana: Alright, we covered all the words from the dialogue.
Eddie: Now let’s take a look at the grammar.

Lesson focus

Oxana: We’ve already explained most of the grammar from this lesson to you.
Eddie: The past tense of verbs, the word for “there is”, “there are” and “have”, and numerals.
Oxana: And numerals are what we’re going to talk about a little more now.
Eddie: Right. Today, we’re going to talk about two categories of numbers: cardinals and ordinals.
Oxana: Cardinal numbers designate the number of people or things and answer the question [сколько], “how many” or “how much”. And ordinal numbers designate order in counting. They answer the question [какой] and [который], “which one”.
Eddie: In our dialogue, we have examples of both. We have the cardinal number in the phrase “from 6 o’clock” and the ordinal in “fifth floor”. The thing that we haven’t told you yet is that cardinal numbers change cases, but luckily they don’t have gender.
Oxana: Except [один] and [два].
Eddie: Yes, the numeral [один] agrees with the related noun by gender, number and case as in…
Oxana:[Один город.]
Eddie: Masculine, singular, nominative.
Oxana: [Одна сумка.]
Eddie:Feminine, singular, nominative.
Oxana: And [Одно здание].
Eddie: Neutral, singular, nominative. All other numerals, when used in phrases and sentences with genitive nouns, should be put in the nominative. I mean when you just talk about the quantity as a fact, not in the context that needs case changes. For example…
Oxana: [два часа] meaning “two hours” or “2 o’clock”. [часа] is the genitive noun and [два] is the nominative numeral. And [пять часов] meaning “five hours”, “5 o’clock”.
Eddie: In the phrase “from 6 o’clock” we have to put both the numeral and the noun [час] in the genitive case. We’ve already given you some examples with the preposition “from” before. Now listen to the modified numerals in other situations.
Oxana: [У меня нет шести рублей.]
Eddie: I don’t have six rubles.
Oxana:[Мне не хватет восьми долларов.]
Eddie:“I'm short eight dollars.” Both the numerals and the nouns were put into the genitive case.
Oxana: We should also mention the ordinal numbers using our example [пятый этаж].
Eddie:As in English, Russian ordinal numbers are formed from cardinal numbers. However, there are more endings in Russian. [ый, ой, ая, ое, ые] As opposed to the main ending, TH in English.
Oxana: [пять] plus the endings [ый, ая, ое, ые ] makes [пятый, пятая, пятое, пятые] which all mean “fifth” but in masculine, feminine and neutral genders and plural number. For example, [пятый час], “fifth hour”. [пятая минута] “fifth minute”. [пятое здание] “fifth building” and [пятые джинс] “fifth pair of jeans”.
Eddie: Of course, like in English, there are exceptions for the numerals first, second and third.
Oxana: In Russian they’re [первый, второй, третий] correspondingly.

Outro

Eddie:That just about does it for today. [Пока!]
Oxana: [До встречи!]
--
Джон: [Здравствуйте, неделю назад я заброниривал номер в этом отеле. ]
John: Zdravstvuite, nedelyu nazad ya zabroniroval nomer v etom otele.
Девушка: [Ваше полное имя пожалуйста.]
Woman: Vashe polnoe imya pozhaliuista.
Джон: [Джон Янг, вот мой паспорт.]
John: John Young, vot moi pasport.
Девушка: [Номер 501, пятый этаж, вот ключи.]
Woman: Nomer 501, pyatyi etazh, vot klyuchi.
Джон:[Скажите, в номере есть беспроводной интернет?]
John: Skazhite, v nomere est’ besprovodnoi internet?
Девушка: [Есть.]
Woman: Est’
Джон:[А во сколько завтрак?]
John: A vo skol’ko zavtrak?
Девушка: [С 6 утра.]
Woman: S shesti utra.

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RussianPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello RussianPod101 listeners!

Which do you prefer? Hotels or hostels?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:39 pm
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Hello Lorren,


Thank you for your comment :smile:


Elena


Team RussianPod101.com

Lorren
Wednesday at 2:47 pm
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He's having a better time than Unlucky Kevin!