Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to RussianPod101.com. This is Business Russian for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 23 - Accepting an Invitation. John Here.
Karina: Привет, I'm Karina.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to accept an invitation. The conversation takes place at an office.
Karina: It's between Alexander and Linda.
John: The speakers are boss and employee, therefore, they will speak formal Russian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Александр: У тебя есть планы на завтрашний вечер?
Александр: После работы мы с коллегами собрались поужинать в новом ресторане. Хочешь присоединиться?
Линда: Конечно, я приду.
Александр: Хорошо! Я пришлю тебе сообщение с адресом и другими деталями.
Линда: Было бы здорово. Спасибо. Буду ждать!
Александр: Не за что!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Александр: У тебя есть планы на завтрашний вечер?
Александр: После работы мы с коллегами собрались поужинать в новом ресторане. Хочешь присоединиться?
Линда: Конечно, я приду.
Александр: Хорошо! Я пришлю тебе сообщение с адресом и другими деталями.
Линда: Было бы здорово. Спасибо. Буду ждать!
Александр: Не за что!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Alexander: Do you have any plans for tomorrow night?
Alexander: After work, all the colleagues will have dinner at a new restaurant. Do you want to join us?
Linda: Sure, I'd like to come.
Alexander: Good! I'll send you a message with the address and other details.
Linda: That would be great, thanks. I'll be waiting.
Alexander: You're welcome!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: This time, Linda was invited to an after-work gathering with her colleagues.
Karina: That was nice of them, wasn't it? I hope they all have a good time!
John: Are parties and outings with work colleagues common in Russia?
Karina: Not compared to other countries, no.
John: What reasons are there for work parties?
Karina: Certain holidays, such as New Year or Women’s Day might be celebrated, as might people’s birthdays.
John: Where do the gatherings happen? Some nice restaurant somewhere?
Karina: It depends on the company. Some companies will have the party in the restaurant, others in the office.
John: I think I’d rather go to a restaurant.
Karina: I’d rather stay in the office. If it’s a work party, then it’s still a formal occasion, and you’d be expected to say good things about your colleagues before a toast.
John: Ah, it’s easier to stay formal and in work mode when you’re in the office.
Karina: Right. More relaxed situations, such as picnics or barbeques, are seen as foreign culture and don’t happen in Russia.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Karina: план [natural native speed]
John: plan
Karina: план[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: план [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: после [natural native speed]
John: after
Karina: после[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: после [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: собираться [natural native speed]
John: to get ready to do something, to be going to do something
Karina: собираться[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: собираться [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: поужинать [natural native speed]
John: to have dinner, supper
Karina: поужинать[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: поужинать [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: присоединяться [natural native speed]
John: to join
Karina: присоединяться[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: присоединяться [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: адрес [natural native speed]
John: address
Karina: адрес[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: адрес [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Karina: детали [natural native speed]
John: details
Karina: детали[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: детали [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Karina: Хочешь присоединиться?
John: meaning "Do you want to join?" What can you tell us about this sentence?
Karina: The first word хочешь, is in second person singular present tense. It means “to want.”
John: And the second word is the infinitive “join.”
Karina: This is an informal way to invite someone.
John: How can you be more formal?
Karina: Don't skip the pronoun, put the verb хотеть into past tense, and add бы. All together, Вы не хотели бы присоединиться?
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Karina: Sure. For example, you can say, Вы не хотели бы присоединиться к нашей компании?
John: ...which means "Would you like to join our company?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Karina: Было бы здорово.
John: meaning "That would be great." What can you tell us about this?
Karina: The first word было means “was.” then there is бы
John: meaning “if.” and finally
Karina: здорово
John: Which means “great.”
Karina: было бы can also mean "would be.”
John: It can be used to make a sentence about something you wish for.
Karina: Yes, just follow it with what you want.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Karina: Sure. For example, you can say, Было бы здорово подписать с ними контракт.
John: ...which means, "It would be great to sign a contract with them."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to accept an invitation. First, let’s see how to make an invitation.
Karina: In the dialogue, Alexander says У тебя есть планы на завтрашний вечер? После работы мы с коллегами собрались поужинать в новом ресторане. Хочешь присоединиться?
John: “Do you have any plans for tomorrow night? After work, all the colleagues will have dinner at a new restaurant. Do you want to join us?”
Karina: This is informal speech. First, Alexander uses у тебя есть
John: “Do you have…” He is asking Linda if she has any plans.
Karina: Then he explains his plan, using собрались, “we are going to,” and an infinitive.
John: How do you accept an invitation?
Karina: An easy acceptance is Конечно, я приду.
John: “Sure, I will come.” This sentence is in the future tense, so let’s quickly review future tense.
Karina: There are a few ways to make sentences in future tense in Russian. The first is with simple future verbs.
John: Simple future verbs are usually formed by prefixes and suffixes. They’re conjugated according to a person, just like the present tense.
Karina: Let’s take слать, meaning “to send,” as an example. You first conjugate it according to person.
John: Let’s go with “I send.”
Karina: Я шлю. And then add the prefix при to this conjugation. Я пришлю.
John: “I will send.”
Karina: Some verbs have the prefix c instead.
John: What’s the other type of future sentences?
Karina: This uses the compound form. These are easier. All we need is the verb быть, "to be," in the future tense, and a verb in the infinitive.
John: Let’s go through an example.
Karina: Я буду ждать
John: “I will be waiting.”
Karina: You can also use the perfective form of the verb. This is similar to the future perfect tense in English.
John: This is used to show that the action will be finished shortly after speaking or by a particular time in the future.
Karina: An example is Почтальон принесёт почту завтра.
John: “The postman will bring the mail tomorrow.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Karina: Пока!

5 Comments

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Do you like after work gatherings among colleagues?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 11:49 pm
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Hello Olivier (как салат!),


1. Прислать / Пoслать, Присылать / Пoсылать - these words have different meanings.


"Пoслать/посылать" means "to send", sending was done, without mentioning if it was delivered to the addressee. "Прислать/присылать" means it was sent and delivered (received).


Прислать / Пoслать - perfecive verbs, and Присылать / Пoсылать - imperfective.


2. "слать" is imperfective. Actually, this verb is rarely used in daily life.


3. отправлять / отправить - they have the same meaning, just first one is imperfective and second one is perfective.


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Olivier (как салат)
Sunday at 9:48 pm
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Sure, Elena, basically, do these verbs have exactly the same meaning?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Sunday at 9:21 pm
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Hello Olivier (как салат!),


Can you please specify your question? The meaning of "indifferently" is a little bit unclear for me.


Thank you,

Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Olivier (как салат!)
Thursday at 3:31 am
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Hi,

I'm confused:

1) Can you use indifferently Присылать / Пoсылать and слать ?

2) Can you use indifferently Прислать / Пoслать

3) What about отправлять / отправить?

Thanks!