Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to RussianPod101.com. This is Business Russian for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 22 - Leaving a Message for a Colleague. John Here.
Karina: Привет, I'm Karina.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to leave a message. The conversation takes place at an office.
Karina: It's between a receptionist and Linda.
John: The speakers are acquaintances, therefore, they will speak formal Russian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Секретарь: Елены нет в офисе.
Линда: Я могу оставить ей сообщение?
Секретарь: Да, пожалуйста, говорите.
Линда: Пожалуйста, передайте ей, что консультант прислал результаты.
Линда: И она должна связаться с ним.
Секретарь: Я передам ей, как только она вернётся.
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Секретарь: Елены нет в офисе.
Линда: Я могу оставить ей сообщение?
Секретарь: Да, пожалуйста, говорите.
Линда: Пожалуйста, передайте ей, что консультант прислал результаты.
Линда: И она должна связаться с ним.
Секретарь: Я передам ей, как только она вернётся.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Receptionist: Elena is not in her office.
Linda: Can I leave her a message?
Receptionist: Yes, please tell me.
Linda: Please tell her that the consultant has sent the results.
Linda: And that she should get in contact with him.
Receptionist: I'll let her know, as soon as she is back.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: In the conversation today, we heard a receptionist doing very stereotypical receptionist work.
Karina: Yes, taking messages for absent bosses.
John: Other than leaving messages with receptionists, how do people get in contact with business associates in Russia?
Karina: If the boss is there, then you’d be able to speak to them on the phone, instead of leaving a message.
John: I guess phone calls are still the quickest and most direct form of communication.
Karina: If you’re given a business card, you might see both an office number and a cell phone number on the card.
John: Are these usually business cell phones or private ones?
Karina: Usually they’re issued by the company, so if the job gets rotated someone else might answer. You might get a business card with a handwritten phone number on it.
John: That would be a private number, right?
Karina: Yes, and it’s a great sign of trust and of a close relationship.
John: What other types of communications are there?
Karina: Invoices and documents used to be sent by fax, but email is more popular these days.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Karina: сообщение [natural native speed]
John: message
Karina: сообщение[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: сообщение [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: консультант [natural native speed]
John: consultant, advisor
Karina: консультант[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: консультант [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: результат [natural native speed]
John: result
Karina: результат[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: результат [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Karina: связаться [natural native speed]
John: to get in touch, to connect
Karina: связаться[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: связаться [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Karina: оставить сообщение
John: ...meaning "to leave a message." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Karina: First is the verb оставлять.
John: Meaning “to leave.”
Karina: And then the noun сообщение.
John: Which is “message.”
Karina: You need to use a noun or pronoun in a dative case when referring to whom you left the message for.
John: What type of message is this?
Karina: It can mean a text, a voice mail, or a short handwritten note.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Karina: Sure. For example, you can say, Оставьте сообщение, если меня не будет в офисе.
John: ...which means "Leave the message if I am not in the office."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Karina: как только
John: meaning "as soon as." What can you tell us about this construction?
Karina: This is a combination of two conjunctions.
John: What two conjunctions?
Karina: “As” and “only.”
John: How’s it used?
Karina: It’s used as a conjunction in sentences, meaning that some action will take place straight after another.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Karina: Sure. For example, you can say, Я приду как только смогу.
John: ...which means "I’ll come as soon as I can."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to leave a message. First, you need to ask if you can leave a message.
Karina: That’s a good start! A phrase you can use is Я могу оставить ей сообщение?
John: “Can I leave a message for her?”
Karina: As we’ve covered before, the modal verb “can” is followed by an infinitive in Russian.
John: As we’re saying “her,” we also need a pronoun, right?
Karina: Yes, a pronoun in dative case. In this case, it’s ей.
John: Let’s look a little more at some pronouns in dative case.
Karina: We use the dative case to show the indirect object of an action.
John: In this case, it’s the person we’re leaving the message for.
Karina: Okay. If you say a pronoun, I’ll tell you the nominative case first, followed by the dative.
John: Sounds good! How about “I” or “me.”
Karina: я and мне.
John: Or “we,” “us.”
Karina: мы and нам.
John: So how can I say “Can I send him a letter?”
Karina: Я могу отправить ему письмо? Next, let’s look at что.
John: In Russian, this means the question word “what.”
Karina: Yes, but it can also be a conjunction meaning “that.”
John: Can you give us an example?
Karina: Он сказал, что придёт в 8.
John: "He said that he'd come at eight."
Karina: When we use что, we always separate the first part of the sentence with a comma. When we use it for the indirect speech, there’s no sequence of tenses.
John: Let’s hear another example.
Karina: Менеджер сказал, что (он) придёт сегодня в восемь.”
John: Which literally means “Manager said that he will come at eight today.”
Karina: Отдел продаж сказал, что они подготовили заказ.
John: Literally, “Sales department said that they prepared the order.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Karina: Пока!

3 Comments

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RussianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try to leave a message for someone in the comments!

RussianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 11:53 PM
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Здравствуйте robert groulx,


Спасибо for posting and studying with us. If you have any questions, please let us know. 😄


Kind regards,

Levente

Team RussianPod101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 12:59 AM
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thank you forv the lesson transcript


, Я приду как только смогу.


robert