Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to RussianPod101.com. This is Business Russian for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 19 - Arriving Late at an Appointment and Notifying the Receptionist. John Here.
Karina: Привет, I'm Karina.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to tell the receptionist about the appointment. The conversation takes place on the phone.
Karina: It's between a receptionist and Linda.
John: The speakers are acquaintances, therefore, they will speak formal Russian. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Секретарь: Добрый вечер.
Линда: Добрый вечер. Я Линда Бейкер из ABC. У меня назначена встреча с Еленой на 5 часов.
Линда: Я звонила сегодня утром.
Секретарь: Да, подождите, я проверю. Пожалуйста, посидите в коридоре.
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Секретарь: Добрый вечер.
Линда: Добрый вечер. Я Линда Бейкер из ABC. У меня назначена встреча с Еленой на 5 часов.
Линда: Я звонила сегодня утром.
Секретарь: Да, подождите, я проверю. Пожалуйста, посидите в коридоре.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Receptionist: Good evening.
Linda: Good evening, I'm Linda Baker from ABC. I have an appointment with Elena at five o'clock.
Linda: I called this morning.
Receptionist: Yes, let me check. Please take a seat in the hall.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I always have this moment of fear whenever I tell a receptionist that I have an appointment.
Karina: Why’s that?
John: In case I have the appointment wrong. What if I got the wrong day or time? How embarrassing!
Karina: Yeah, that would be embarrassing, especially if you’ve traveled a long way. Luckily Linda didn’t have that problem.
John: Right. The receptionist had her details.
Karina: But receptionists don’t just take appointments and make coffee. In some companies they do much more than that.
John: What other kind of duties might they have?
Karina: In some companies, they might be more like a general manager or personal assistant.
John: Oh, maintaining schedules and accompanying the boss?
Karina: Right. What image do you have of a receptionist?
John: Well, I think the old stereotype is a young girl who knows all of the rumors.
Karina: Yeah, that’s the stereotype in Russia too. Although it’s just a stereotype, you still won’t see many male receptionists or personal assistants.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Karina: проверить [natural native speed]
John: to check, to examine
Karina: проверить[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: проверить [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: сидеть [natural native speed]
John: to sit
Karina: сидеть[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: сидеть [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: коридор [natural native speed]
John: hall, corridor, passage
Karina: коридор[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: коридор [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Karina: встреча [natural native speed]
John: meeting
Karina: встреча[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: встреча [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Karina: с [natural native speed]
John: with, starting from, from, since
Karina: с[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Karina: с [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of one of the phrases from this lesson. The phrase is...
Karina: подождите, я проверю
John: ...meaning "let me check." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Karina: First is подождите, “wait” in imperative form. And then я проверю
John: Which means “I will check.”
Karina: The imperative подождите is used for plural pronouns or polite speech.
John: What is the informal form?
Karina: That’s подожди.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Karina: Sure. For example, you can say, Подождите, я проверю, есть ли Вы в списке.
John: ...which means "Let me check if you are on the list."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to tell the receptionist about the appointment. First, you need to introduce yourself. The receptionist won’t be able to find your appointment without your name!
Karina: Plus, it’s just good manners to start a phone call or greeting with your name, and possibly your company too.
John: Of course it is! In the conversation, Linda said “Good evening, I'm Linda Baker from ABC.”
Karina: Добрый вечер. Я Линда Бейкер из ABC.
John: Is this a standard greeting that can be used by anyone?
Karina: Both male and female workers can use this. You can omit из, meaning “from,” from the sentence.
John: So just saying “I’m Linda Baker, ABC company,” is fine?
Karina: Yes. That’d be Я Линда Бейкер, компания ABC.
John: After the introduction, we should say that we have an appointment.
Karina: We can use a sentence like У меня назначена встреча с Еленой на 5 часов.
John: “I have an appointment with Elena at five o'clock.” What parts of this should we pay attention to?
Karina: First is У меня, which means “I have.” It comes first in these sentences. Also, pay attention to the passive participle назначена.
John: meaning “is scheduled.” Can we hear another example?
Karina: У него запланировано совещание с отделом рекламы на 8 часов утра.
John: “He has a meeting with the PR department at 8 am.” After you’ve explained your appointment, the receptionist will probably give you some instructions.
Karina: Right. These will probably be in imperative form.
John: In the conversation, the receptionist says “Yes, let me check. Please take a seat in the hall.”
Karina: That is Да, подождите я проверю. Пожалуйста, посидите в коридоре. Подождите and посидите are imperatives.
John: We use imperatives to ask or tell someone to do something.
Karina: This isn’t impolite, but you can make it polite by adding пожалуйста.
John: How can we tell when something is in the imperative form?
Karina: In informal speech, it usually ends in -и, -ай, or ь.
John: How about in formal speech?
Karina: In a formal situation, as the one in the dialogue, or when we speak to more than one person, we take the informal imperative form and add -те.
John: There’s more information on the imperative form in the lesson notes, so please check it out!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Karina: Пока!

2 Comments

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RussianPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Can you write a sentence using the imperative?

robert groulx
Friday at 1:33 am
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thank you for the lesson transcript


“I have an appointment with Elena at five o'clock.


robert