Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eddie: Eddie here. Beginner Series Season 2, Lesson 20 – Table near the broken window. Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Today, let’s leave Kevin alone for a while and just observe some random Russian people and their behavior in various places.
Oksan: And even ease drop a little. How about we go to a restaurant and do it over a meal, Eddie?
Eddie: Good idea. Oh, I can see an interesting couple fighting. Let’s get closer and find out what’s going on.
Oksana: Yeah, let’s listen to their conversation.
DIALOGUE
Eddie: [Здравствуйте, мы хотели бы поужинать.]
Oksana: [Да, конечно. Вот там есть свободный столик.]
Oksana: [Возле разбитого окна?]
Oksana : [К сожалению, все остальные столики заняты.]
Oksana: [Если бы ты забронировал, мы не сидели бы между разбитым окном и туалетом!]
Eddie: [Once again, more slowly. Еще раз, медленне. Здравствуйте, мы хотели бы поужинать.]
Oksana: [Да, конечно. Вот там есть свободный столик.]
Oksana: [Возле разбитого окна?]
Oksana : [К сожалению, все остальные столики заняты.]
Oksana: [Если бы ты забронировал, мы не сидели бы между разбитым окном и туалетом!]
Eddie: And once again with a translation.]
Oksana: Еще раз, с переводом. Здравствуйте, мы хотели бы поужинать.
Eddie: Hello, we would like to have dinner.
Oksana: Да, конечно. Вот там есть свободный столик.
Eddie: Yes, of course, there’s a free table over there.
Oksana: Возле разбитого окна?
Eddie: Near the broken window?
Oksana: К сожалению, все остальные столики заняты.
Eddie: I’m afraid all the other tables are taken.
Oksana: Если бы ты забронировал, мы не сидели бы между разбитым окном и туалетом!
Eddie: If you had booked, we wouldn’t be sitting between the broken window and the toilet.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eddie: A typical situation. Not the broken window, but a woman complaining. Now I know that in Russia it happens too. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Oksana: [Поужинать]
Eddie: To have dinner, to have supper.
Oksana: [Поужинать]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Вот там]
Eddie: Over there.
Oksana: [Вот там]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Свободный]
Eddie: Free, available.
Oksana: [Свободный]
Eddie: And next.
Oksana: [Столик]
Eddie: A table in a restaurant, a small table.
Oksana: [Столик]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Разбитый]
Eddie: Broken.
Oksana: [Разбитый]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Окно]
Eddie: A window.
Oksana: [Окно]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Все остальные]
Eddie: All the other.
Oksana: [Все остальные]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Занят]
Eddie: Occupied, busy.
Oksana: [Занят]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Забронировать]
Eddie: To book.
Oksana: [Забронировать]
Eddie: Next.
Oksana: [Сидеть]
Eddie: To sit.
Oksana: [Сидеть]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eddie: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Oksana: The first word we’ll look at is [поужинать], which means “to have dinner”.
Eddie: We have a prefix, [по], in the beginning which indicates the verb used in the perfective aspect, expressing one concrete, completed action. If we didn’t have this [по] at the beginning, we would get the word [ужинать] in the imperfective aspect and it would express an ongoing or a habitual act.
Oksana: Right. Let me remind you of the words for having breakfast and lunch as well. So [позавтракать] will be “to have breakfast” and [пообедать] would be “to have lunch”.
Eddie: The next word is [вот там], “over there”, where [вот] is just a specification of where exactly, like “over” in English.
Oksana: The next word [свободный] means “free” or “not occupied”. The opposite of it is [занятый] or just [занят], a short adjective, like what we had in the dialogue.
Eddie: [Столик] means “little table”, but in the restaurant all the tables are called [столик] whether they’re small or big.
Oksana: Then we have the adjective from broken, [разбитый]. In our case, it was a broken window, and because “a window”, [окно], has neutral gender, we should change [разбитый] into [разбитое].
Eddie: All adjectives and pronouns should correspond to the nouns, remember? Also [разбитый] is used for glass or other fragile things that can break. You can’t use it for devices which have broken down.
Oksana: In this case, you should use the word [сломанный]. For example, [Сломанный пылесос].
Eddie: “A broken vacuum cleaner”. And next we had a phrase…
Oksana: [Все остальные.]
Eddie: Where [все] means “all” and [остальные] means “the rest”, “the other ones”.
Oksana: [Все остальные столики.]
Eddie: [Все остальные] can be followed by a noun or just used alone.
Oksana: [Все остальные люди.]
Eddie: All the other people.
Oksana: [Все остальные ушли.]
Eddie: “All the others have left.” And lastly we have another two very familiar words to us.
Oksana: [Сидеть]
Eddie: “To sit” and...
Oksana: [Забронировать]
Eddie: To book, to reserve.
LESSON FOCUS
Eddie: Let’s take a look at the grammar part of our lesson and learn how to use the words we’ve just learned. But wait, today’s lesson is just a compilation of the previous four.
Oksana: Lucky you.
Eddie: So the first grammar point will be the genitive case after prepositions of place.
Oksana: The example of it in our dialogue is [возле разбитого окна].
Eddie: “Near the broken window.” Some prepositions of place in Russian are followed by the genitive case, for example…
Oksana: [Напротив]
Eddie: In front of.
Oksana: [Возле]
Eddie: Near, next to.
Oksana: [Справа от]
Eddie: To the right of.
Oksana: [Слева от]
Eddie: To the left of.
Oksana: [недалеко от]
Eddie: “Not far from”. Here you have to pay attention to the endings. Masculine adjectives have the words [его] or [ово]. And nouns end with [а] or [я].
Oksana: For example, [напротив моего дома ] means “in front of my house”.
Eddie: The adjectives in feminine gender have the endings [ой] or [ей], and nouns in this gender end with [и] or [ы]. For example…
Oksana: [Недалеко от большой реки.]
Eddie: “Not far from a big river.” The next thing to focus on is the instrumental case after prepositions of place. Like in the sentence…
Oksana: [Между разбитым окном и туалетом.]
Eddie: “Between the broken window and the toilet.” Some prepositions of place in Russian are followed by the instrumental case. For example…
Oksana: [Между]
Eddie: Between.
Oksana: [За]
Eddie: Behind.
Oksana: [Перед]
Eddie: “In front of, before.” The endings in the instrumental case are the following. For the masculine adjectives, they would be [им] or [ым]. And for nouns, [ом] or [ем].
Oksana: Like in the sentence [Перед моим домом].
Eddie: “In front of my house.” Feminine adjectives in the instrumental case end with [ой] or [ей] and nouns have the exact same endings, [ой] or [ей].
Oksana: [За автобусной остановкой.]
Eddie: “Behind the bus stop.” The third point to review today is the conditionals that describe unreal situations. In the dialogues, it was this sentence.
Oksana: [ Если бы ты забронировал, мы не сидели бы между разбитым окном и туалетом!]
Eddie: “If you had booked, we wouldn’t be sitting between the broken window and the toilet.” I can understand her frustration, but why didn’t she book the table herself?
Oksana: Your defence reaction is also very common, but what do we have with the grammar there?
Eddie: Well, we use these types of sentences to talk about unreal, hypothetical situations. In such sentences, you use [бы] and the past tense of the verb in both parts of the sentence. The position of [бы] can vary, but usually it goes directly after [если] in the “if” part and directly after or before the verb in the second part. Give us an example, Oksana.
Oksana: [Если бы у меня было много денег,я купила бы дорогую машину.]
Eddie: “If I had a lot of money, I’d buy an expensive car.” Another typical complaint, “I don’t have any money”.
Oksana: Oh, come on. I think men complain about it way more than women do. So we have [если бы] in the first part of the sentence and [бы] in another.
OUTRO
Eddie: That just about does it for today. Ok, some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool on RussianPod101.com.
Oksan: Line by line audio.
Eddie: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension.
Oksan: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Eddie: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we break down the dialogue into comprehensible, bite-sized sentences.
Oksan: You can try the line by line audio in the Premium Learning Center at RussianPod101.com.
Eddie: So thanks for being with us today. See you soon.
Oksan: [Пока!]

Grammar

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3 Comments

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RussianPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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Hello Listeners!

Learning a new language is fun and interesting. What is the most interesting thing about Russian?

 

Regards,

Russianpod101.com

RussianPod101.comVerified
Friday at 10:22 pm
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Hi Shelby,


Thank you for posting.


Regarding Russian sentence structure/grammar, these lessons can help you out to improve your knowledge:

Russian Grammar Is Easy! Learn the Russian writing system - https://www.russianpod101.com/lesson/all-about-2-russian-grammar-is-easy/

Introduction to Russian Grammar. Learn a little about Russian grammar - https://www.russianpod101.com/lesson/introduction-to-russian-3-introduction-to-russian-grammar/


Keep up studying well and soon you'll see great results!


And, of course, if you have any questions, we're here to help!


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team RussianPod101.com

Shelby
Friday at 12:42 am
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How Russian can simultaneously make so much sense and be simpler than the English sentence structure and then be so much more confusing haha :). The cases are a concept that takes time getting used to. And the differences definitely make it a very fun and interesting language.