Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Anna: [Здравствуй, Куба, меня зовут Анна]
Eric: Eric here. Beginner Series Season 1, Lesson 18 – Tickets to the Kremlin, “Do you need a few or many?” Hi, my name’s Eric and I'm joined here by…
Anna: Anna.
Eric: [Добрый вечер, Анна]
Anna: [Добрый вечер, Эрик]
Eric: Good evening.
Anna: Good evening.
Eric: Alright.
Anna: Hello everyone and welcome back to RussianPod101.com
Eric: In the previous lesson, we focused on going to the Russian bath or [баня].
Anna: The focus of today’s lesson is buying tickets and asking very important question – why?
Eric: This conversation takes place at the Moscow, Kremlin Ticket Office.
Anna: The conversation is between James Johnson and a ticket agent.
Eric: The speakers do not know each other so they will be speaking in formal Russian. I’ll be reprising my role as Jimmy Johnson.
Anna: Today I’ll be playing a ticket agent.
Eric: Anna, you are a multi-faceted woman.
Anna: I know.
Eric: You’re a construction worker, man, ticket agent. What else are you? I can’t wait till the next lesson. Here we go.
DIALOGUE
Eric: [Один билет в Кремль и один билет в Оружейную Палату, пожалуйста.]
Anna: [В Оружейную Палату больше нет билетов.]
Eric: [Почему?]
Anna: [В Москве много туристов, а билетов мало.]
Eric: Once again, slowly.
Anna: Еще раз, медленнее.
Eric: [Один билет в Кремль и один билет в Оружейную Палату, пожалуйста.]
Anna: [В Оружейную Палату больше нет билетов.]
Eric: [Почему?]
Anna: [В Москве много туристов, а билетов мало.]
Eric: One time, natural native speed with translation.
Anna: Еще раз, с переводом.
Anna: [Один билет в Кремль и один билет в Оружейную Палату, пожалуйста.]
Eric: One ticket to the Kremlin and one ticket to the armory chamber, please.
Anna: [В Оружейную Палату больше нет билетов.]
Eric: There are no more tickets to the armory chamber.
Anna: [Почему?]
Eric: Why?
Anna: [В Москве много туристов, а билетов мало.]
Eric: There are many tourists in Moscow, but few tickets.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Anna: So Eric, have you ever purchased tickets in Russia?
Eric: Yes, Anna, quite a few actually when I was traveling on the Siberian railroad. When I purchased my tickets, the people in the ticket office realized I wasn’t Russian, so they were actually pretty helpful. One time I even missed my train because I was on the wrong side of the tracks and they helped me to get a new ticket. How about you, Anna? Aren’t you going to Moscow next month? Are you excited?
Anna: Yeah, of course, Eric. But [Я еще не была в Оружейной палате] I haven’t been to the armory chamber yet. Should definitely visit it.
Eric: Do you think [в Москве много туристов] or in Moscow there’s a lot of tourists this time of year?
Anna: I think there are many tourists in Moscow throughout the year. [Москва - очень красивый город] Moscow is a very beautiful city.
Eric: [Это правда] That’s true.
Anna: Ok, let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: First word.
Anna: [билет]
Eric: A ticket.
Anna: [билет]
Eric: Next.
Anna: [больше]
Eric: More, any more, bigger.
Anna: [больше]
Eric: Next.
Anna: [почему]
Eric: Why.
Anna: [почему]
Eric: Next.
Anna: [мало]
Eric: Few, little.
Anna: [мало]
Eric: Next.
Anna: [турист]
Eric: A tourist.
Anna: [много]
Eric: Next.
Anna: [много]
Eric: A lot of, many, much.
Anna: [много]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Eric: Now let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of words and phrases from this lesson.
Anna: The first word is [билет]. Like in English, the word [билет] or “ticket” is used for lots of different things.
Eric: If you want to say, for example, “train ticket”, you should say [билет на поезд], right, Anna?
Anna: Right.
Eric: Ok. And [на поезд] is?
Anna: “For train”.
Eric: “For train”, ok. And how would you say “air ticket” or “airplane ticket”?
Anna: [билет на самолет]
Eric: And [самолет] is “plane”.
Anna: “Plane”, right. Just add preposition [на] after [билет] or “ticket” and then “train” or “airplane”.
Eric: Great. Our next word is [больше] which is the comparative form of [большой] or “big”. We mainly use it in comparative sentences. It can mean both “more” and “bigger”. In negative sentences, [больше] can be translated as “no more” or “any more”.
Anna: Ok, thank you, Eric. Our next word is [почему] which is “why” in English. It’s mainly used at the beginning of a question. It can also link two sentences. Careful, it doesn’t mean “because”.
Eric: Anna, how would you say “because”?
Anna: [потому]
Eric: [потому что] What’s [потому что]? I always heard “because” with [потому что].
Anna: [потому что] is used to link two sentences. For example, “Why didn’t you come yesterday?” [Потому что, я была занята] “Because I was busy.”
Eric: So you need the [что]. In this case it means “that”. So Anna, how would you say “because”?
Anna: [потому что]
Eric: [потому что]
Anna: Right.
Eric: Anna, I have a question for you.
Anna: Ok.
Eric: [Почему ты любишь Москву?] Why do you love Moscow, Anna?
Anna: [Потому, что Москва очень красивый город.] Because Moscow is a very beautiful city.
Eric: Anna, can we break down the question and the answer?
Anna: Ok.
Eric: Ok. So you’ll say the Russian and I’ll say the English.
Anna: [Почему]
Eric: Why.
Anna: [ты]
Eric: You.
Anna: [любишь]
Eric: Love.
Anna: [Москву]
Eric: “Moscow”. “Why do you love Moscow?”
Anna: Right.
Eric: Ok.
Anna: [Потому что]
Eric: Because.
Anna: [Москва]
Eric: Moscow.
Anna: [очень]
Eric: Very.
Anna: [красивый]
Eric: Beautiful.
Anna: [город]
Eric: “City”. So literally “Because Moscow very beautiful city” or “Because Moscow is a very beautiful city”.
Anna: Right.
Eric: Ok. Excellent. So as you know, we don’t use “to be” in the present tense in Russian.
LESSON FOCUS
Eric: Ok, Anna, now it’s time for grammar.
Anna: Ok.
Eric: In our dialogue, we used [много], which is used with both countable and uncountable nouns.
Anna: Right. We said [много туристов].
Eric: So normally it’s [турист] or “tourist”.
Anna: Right.
Eric: But after [много] what do we need to do to the word?
Anna: We change the ending of the noun because of the genitive case.
Eric: So [турист] becomes?
Anna: [туристов]
Eric: [туристов] And the same with [мало], right?
Anna: Right.
Eric: If you say “There are a lot of tourist,” how would you say that?
Anna: [много туристов]
Eric: [много туристов] And if you say “There are few tourists?”
Anna: [мало туристов]
Eric: [мало туристов] Ok, great. So Anna, I noticed in our dialogue the cashier said [Больше нет билетов]. Why is [билетов] in this dialogue?
Anna: This is another example of genitive case. When you say that there is not more or you don’t have anything, you use the genitive case. So in our example, [В Оружейную Палату больше нет билетов.] “There are no more tickets to the armory chamber” [билет] becomes [билетов] because there are no more.
Eric: No more what, Anna?
Anna: Tickets.
OUTRO
Eric: So if you’d like to see several examples of [много, мало] and other instances of the genitive case, please check out the PDF. We also have exceptions to this rule, so please see the PDF if you’d like to find out more. Alright, Anna, that just about does it for today.
Anna: Don’t forget that you can leave us a comment on this lesson.
Eric: It’s very easy to do. Just stop by RussianPod101.com, click on ‘Comments’, enter your comment name and that’s it.
Anna: We are looking forward to hearing from you.
Eric: Ok, see you next time.
Anna: [До встречи]

Grammar

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26 Comments

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RussianPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Hello listeners! 

Have you ever been to Moscow? 

Let's see if you can say this in Russian? - " A lot of tourists visit Kremlin when they go to Moscow".

 

Regards,

Russianpod101.com

robert groulx
Friday at 11:11 pm
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thank you for the lesson transcript


robert

RussianPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 1:56 am
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Hello Adrian,


Wish you good luck! And your sentences are perfect. 😄


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

Adrian
Sunday at 7:35 am
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Фактически в этом году я е́ду в Санкт-Петербург в апреле! 😄❤️️

Adrian
Sunday at 7:26 am
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Всем привет!

Я никогда не был в Rоссии.

Я только слышал, что многие туристы посещают Кремль, когда едут в Москву.


Thanks for every lecture!


Болшое спасибо!

RussianPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 3:09 am
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Hello Steve,

"a" means "but", "и" means "and".

Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

STEVE
Thursday at 6:41 am
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What is the difference between "A" and "N"?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 11:12 am
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Hello Metboy,


[друзей] is Genitive case of the plural noun [друзья].


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

metboy
Wednesday at 4:18 pm
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У меня мало друзей.

I have few friends.


I know plural case of друг is друзья.

what is друзей?

RussianPod101.comVerified
Friday at 1:19 pm
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Hello Metboy,


больше - bigger, more, it is derived from "большой", "big”:


! Этот дом больше, чем тот (this house is bigger than that one)

! Я люблю тебя больше жизни (I love you more than my life).


более - more. It is used to make comparison: более красивый (more beautiful), более дешевый (cheaper).


больший - has two meanings: - mainly, larger, bigger. For example: Он съел большую часть пирога. (He ate the most part of cake, its biggest part.)


Elena

Team RussianPod101.com

metboy
Wednesday at 5:15 pm
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what is the grammatical difference among больше, более and больший?

are they all substitutional with no restriction?