Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eddie: Welcome back to Basic Bootcamp. This five-part series will help you ease your way into Russian.
Oksana: We’ll go over all the basics that will really help you understand Russian much quicker and easier.
Eddie: In this lesson, we’ll continue on with more of the essentials of Russian numbers. But in this lesson, we will venture into higher number territory…the numbers over one hundred all the way to the ten thousand. Let’s listen to the numbers in Russian.
DIALOGUE
Oksana: сто, двести, триста, четыреста, пятьсот, шестьсот, семьсот, восемьсот, девятьсот, тысяча, две тысячи, три тысячи, четыре тысячи, пять тысяч, шесть тысяч, семь тысяч, восемь тысяч, девять тысяч, десять тысяч, двадцать тысяч, тридцать тысяч, сорок тысяч, пятьдесят тысяч, шестьдесят тысяч, семьдесят тысяч, восемьдесят тысяч, девяносто тысяч, сто тысяч, миллион.
Eddie: And again, slowly.
Oksana: сто, двести, триста, четыреста, пятьсот, шестьсот, семьсот, восемьсот, девятьсот, тысяча, две тысячи, три тысячи, четыре тысячи, пять тысяч, шесть тысяч, семь тысяч, восемь тысяч, девять тысяч, десять тысяч, двадцать тысяч, тридцать тысяч, сорок тысяч, пятьдесят тысяч, шестьдесят тысяч, семьдесят тысяч, восемьдесят тысяч, девяносто тысяч, сто тысяч, миллион.
Eddie: Let`s go again with translation.
Oksana: сто, двести, триста, четыреста
Eddie: one hundred, two hundred, three hundred, four hundred
Oksana: пятьсот, шестьсот, семьсот, восемьсот, девятьсот
Eddie: five hundred, six hundred, seven hundred, eight hundred, nine hundred
Oksana: тысяча, две тысячи, три тысячи, четыре тысячи
Eddie: one thousand, two thousand, three thousand, four thousand
Oksana: пять тысяч, шесть тысяч, семь тысяч, восемь тысяч, девять тысяч
Eddie: five thousand, six thousand, seven thousand, eight thousand, nine thousand
Oksana: десять тысяч, двадцать тысяч, тридцать тысяч, сорок тысяч, пятьдесят тысяч
Eddie: ten thousand, twenty thousand, thirty thousand, forty thousand, fifty thousand
Oksana: шестьдесят тысяч, семьдесят тысяч, восемьдесят тысяч, девяносто тысяч, сто тысяч
Eddie: sixty thousand, seventy thousand, eighty thousand, ninety thousand, one hundred thousand
Oksana: And the last one - миллион
Eddie: a million.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eddie: Let`s use these numbers a little. Let’s talk about prices in Russia.
Oksana: Well, I think that prices do vary a lot. It depends where you are and what you eat.
Eddie: What’s the price of an average meal in St. Petersburg? What about a very nice meal in St. Petersburg?
Oksana: Well, St. Petersburg is not the cheapest city in Russia, of course, but you can have a nice meal in an average restaurant for 500-700 rubles.
Eddie: Which is roughly 17-23 US dollars. What about a very nice meal?
Oksana: Oh, the price might jump up to 4,000 rubles and it still wouldn’t be the most expensive one.
Eddie: Wow, that’s about 130 US dollars! The food must be really good there.
Oksana: The most expensive food is usually something exotic, like Asian food or a restaurant’s special. But I don’t think our listeners will go to Russia to try Thai or Japanese food. And for an average Russian meal, 500-700 rubles should be enough.
Eddie: So how would you say those prices in Russian, Oksana?
Oksana: пятьсот - семьсот рублей
Eddie: 500 to 700 rubles. Let’s take a look at the structure of multiples of one hundred.
Oksana: We’ve already learned how to say "one hundred," “сто”. So, to build multiples of one hundred we simply take numbers from two to nine and add “сто”.
Eddie: Although you might hear different endings that only slightly resemble “сто”, they all mean one hundred. They are just modifications of one hundred according to Russian grammar. So listen:
Oksana: двести, триста, четыреста, пятьсот, шестьсот, семьсот, восемьсот, девятьсот.
LESSON FOCUS
Eddie: Only the number "two", “два”, changes into “две” in “двести”.Let’s break that down and see how “сто” changes according to numbers.
Oksana: две-сти, три-ста, четыре-ста, пять-сот, шесть-сот, семь-сот, восемь-сот, девять-сот
Eddie: From the previous Bootcamp, we also remember how to build three-digit numbers with one hundred. Now we’ll use the same system to build numbers two hundred through nine hundred ninety-nine.
Oksana: четыреста один.
Eddie: "Four hundred and one" sounds familiar. Oh, there is a horror TV show in America called “Room 401.” And saying this number, you don’t need “and” between "four hundred" and "one." Just “four hundred one.” Next?
Oksana: двести тридцать семь.
Eddie: Why do you come up with such creepy numbers? Room 237 was the one in Steven King’s “The Shining”, the one all the horror started from!
Oksana: Yeah, somehow I have a good memory for creepy things.
Eddie: Anyway, it sounds exactly like the English “two hundred thirty-seven”.
Oksana: девятьсот четырнадцать
Eddie: And again, we have a literal translation into English, "914". And luckily I have a better association with this number. There was a cute old Porsche built about forty years ago called VW-Porsche 914.
Oksana: And about five years earlier, Porsche “девятьсот двенадцать” was built.
Eddie: "Porsche 912". Okay, can you remember any other interesting things with numbers one thousand and above? Oh, but first, Oksana, give us the word for "thousands".
Oksana: тысяча.
Eddie: So one thousand?
Oksana: одна тысяча ("one thousand"), but you don’t really have to say “one” here. “Тысяча” already has a grammatical ending, which defines its singular number.
Eddie: And "four thousand"?
Oksana: четыре тысячи
Eddie: So we take the number four and add one thousand, but be careful. The ending in “тысячи” has changed because of the plural number.
Oksana: тысячи
Eddie: So here’s what we have.
Oksana: тысяча, две тысячи, три тысячи, четыре тысячи
Eddie: What do we do with the rest of our thousands?
Oksana: Well, the numbers from five to twenty remain just as we’ve learned them, but the ending in “тысяча” is changing into “тысяч”: пять тысяч, шесть тысяч, семь тысяч, восемь тысяч, девять тысяч, десять тысяч, пятнадцать тысяч, семнадцать тысяч…
Eddie: When we say twenty-one thousand, twenty-two thousand, twenty-three thousand or twenty-four thousand “тысяча” changes by the same rules as in one thousand, two thousand, three thousand, and four thousand and becomes “тысячи”. Starting from the number five, “тысяча” changes into “тысяч”. Once again.
Oksana: “двадцать пять тысяч”, twenty-five thousand, “двадцать семь тысяч”, twenty-seven thousand and so on.
Eddie: So you just take a multiple of ten (ten, twenty, thirty...), add a number from one to nine, and then add “thousand”. Just pay attention to the changes of the endings in “тысяча”…
Oksana: Ok, once again. Двадцать одна тясяча. Двадцать две, двадцать три, двадцать четыре - тысячи, and 25 - 29 (двадцать пять, двадцать шесть, двадцать семь, двадцать восемь, двадцать девять) - тысяч.
Eddie: This rule is one and for all multiples of thousands. Just look at the numbers from one to nine when making decision about the ending changing. Now let’s learn multiples of ten and hundred thousand. Simply take the multiples of ten and one hundred that we’ve already learned and added “тысяч”.
Oksana: десять тысяч (ten thousand), сорок тысяч (forty thousand), девяносто тысяч (ninety thousand), сто тысяч (one hundred thousand), триста тысяч (three hundred thousand).
Eddie: Now give us a complicated four-digit number.
Oksana: две тысячи девять
Eddie: Nice, that’s the current year. As you can hear, all Oksana said was “две тысячи” and “девять”. She didn’t pronounce zeroes, just like in English. Another one, please.
Oksana: девяносто тысяч двести десять
Eddie: Another TV show number 90210. But in Russian, we’d say that as “ninety thousand two hundred ten.” Okay, give us the last one, Oksana. The year you were born, for example.
Oksana: Oh, you didn’t have to say “for example” to know my age. Anyway, I’ve mentioned it before. So, the year I was born in is “тысяча девятьсот восемьдесят четыре”.
Eddie: 1984. So the formula with numbers in the thousands is, first you say how many thousands you have, then how many hundreds, then tens, then ones.
Oksana: Yes, like in most languages.
Eddie: We still have two numbers we haven’t mentioned. One million and zero.
Oksana: Well, when it comes to zero, I can’t think of any example other than saying it in your phone number, when we pronounce all the digits separately. And one million—it even sounds like in English, let alone its usage!
Eddie: What about all other millions, doesn’t the ending in “миллион” change?
Oksana: It does, but it will be easy to remember. Один миллион.
Eddie: "one million"
Oksana: два, три, четыре миллиона
Eddie: "two, three, four million"
Oksana: пять, шесть, семь, восемь, девять миллионов
Eddie: "five, six, seven, eight, nine million"
Oksana: So, the changes are - “миллиона” and “миллионов”.
Eddie: Give us an example.
Oksana: I’m looking for a meaningful one… восемь миллионов шестьсот пятьдесят две тысячи сто девяносто пять (8,652,195).
Eddie: And what does that mean? Not something creepy again, I hope.
Oksana: Well, it depends on how you look at it. It’s the population of Moscow!
Eddie: Okay, so we use our usual formula here. Eight million, six hundred fifty-two thousand, one hundred ninety-five. Same as in English. And now, let’s have another example, the only one where we pronounce digits separately in Russian - a phone number.
Oksana: три - четыре - ноль - семь - два - шесть - один - восемь (3407-2618)
Eddie: They can also be pronounced in tens, but for better understanding, use separate digits.
OUTRO
Oksana: I think that’s a lot of numbers for today.
Eddie: Yes, I am more than satisfied with my number quota of the day.
Oksana: Ok, thanks for listening everyone and “До новых встреч”! See you again!
Eddie: Bye!

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RussianPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Which are more difficult for you, the numbers below 100, or above it?

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RussianPod101.com
Wednesday at 11:42 am
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Hello metboy,


You are welcome. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


* How can I read “1920-м” and “1930-м”?

You can read as "тысяча девятьсот двадцатом" and "тысяча девятьсот тридцатом" .


Elena


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metboy
Friday at 5:08 pm
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sorry for another question...


On entry for "между", I found a phrase "между 1920-м и 1930-м годом", which means "between 1920 to 1930".

I wonder how I pronounce the phrase.

1920 is "тысяча девятьсот двадцать", right?

How can I read "1920-м" and "1930-м"?


Always thank you for your help!

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metboy
Friday at 1:29 pm
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Thank you very much for you kind answer.

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RussianPod101.com
Friday at 12:19 pm
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Hello Metboy,


You are right, plural form of "человек” in Nominative case is “люди”.

However, there are many "irregular" nouns which in Genitive plural have zero ending and doesn't correspond to plural form of Nominative case.


For example the word солдат (soldier) in plural is "солдаты". However, in Genitive plural it will be the same солдат (soldier).


The same is about “человек”.


You just need to remember those nouns.


Elena


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metboy
Monday at 10:29 pm
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You said “человек” is Genitive plural form.

that means “человек” is plural form of "человек"

I'm so confused.

Because I thought plural form of "человек" is "люди".

Did I get somthing wrong?

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RussianPod101.com
Friday at 11:35 am
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Hello Metboy,


Sample sentences are correct.


"человек" is Genitive plural form. It is the same as Nominative case. We have some words that in Genitive plural sound the same like Nominative. For example: глаз (eye), солдат (soldier), сапог (boot) etc.


Elena


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metboy
Wednesday at 7:14 am
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За НН проголосовали двадцать тысяч человек.

На стадионе собралось пятьдесят тысяч человек.

В нашей компании работают пятьсот человек.


Those are sample sentenses on the lesson note.

I think "человек" must be in genitive plural case, "людей".

Isn't it?

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RussianPod101.com
Thursday at 5:35 pm
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Thank you Ed,

We will fix it.


Svetlana

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Ed
Tuesday at 1:44 am
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in pdf: На станионе собралось пятьдесят

тысяч человек


should be:

На стадионе....