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Lesson Transcript

Hello and welcome to Russian Survival Phrases. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Russia. So join us for Russian Survival phrases. You will be surprised at how far a little Russian will go.
In today's lesson, we'll introduce you to a phrase that will help you get to the places you need to be. In some places, trains and subways are the way to travel. But it's also very useful to know how to rent a car, scooter or a bicycle.
In Russian, “I would like to rent a car” is “Ya khatel by arendavat' mashynu”. Ya khatel by arendavat' mashynu. Let`s break it down by syllable: Ya kha-tel by a-ren-da-vat' ma-shy-nu . Now, let`s hear it once again: Ya khatel by arendavat' mashynu.
The first word “ya” means “I”. Let`s break down this word and hear it one more time: ya.
This is followed by “khatel by”, which in English is “would like to”: kha-tel by, khatel by. So to recap here, we have “Ya khatel by”. Literally this means “I would like to”.
Let's take a look at the next “arendavat'”, which means “rent”: a-ren-da-vat` and arendavat`. The last word is “mashynu”, which means “car”: ma-shy-nu and mashynu. So, altogether we have “Ya khatel by arendavat' mashynu”. Literally, this means “I would like to rent car”.
Now, we'll look at the words for other vehicles to open up your transportation options. In Russian, the word for “scooter” is “mapet”: ma-pet and mapet. The phrase “I would like to rent a scooter” is “Ya by khatel arendavat' mapet”. Ya by kha-tel a-ren-da-vat' ma-pet. Ya khatel by arendavat' mapet.
Now, let's try the word “bicycle”, which in Russian is “velasipet”. And “I would like to rent a bicycle” is “Ya khatel by arendavat' velasipet”.
We're giving you this word, but you probably will not be using this. That's because in Russia bicycle is an object of excessive interest for robbers due to its portable weight and you can hardly find any bicycle parked at the shop or in front of the building.
If you're renting something, it's also important to know when you must return it. Therefore, we're giving you a phrase you can use to make sure to return it on time.
In Russian, “When must I return it?” is “Kagda ya dolzhen eta vernut'”. Kagda ya dolzhen eta vernut'. Let`s break it down by syllable: Kag-da ya dol-zhen e-ta ver-nut'. Now, let`s hear it once again: Kagda ya dolzhen eta vernut'.
The first word “kagda” means “when”. Let`s break down this word and hear it one more time: kag-da and kagda. This is followed by “ya”, which in English is “I”: ya. So, to recap here we have “kagda ya”. Literally, this means “When I”. Let's take a look at the next “dolzhen”, which means “must”: dol-zhen and dolzhen. It is followed by “eta”, which in English is “it”: e-ta and eta. And the last word is “vernut'”, which means “return”: ver-nut' and vernut'. So, altogether, we have “Kagda ya dolzhen eta vernut'?”. Literally this means “When I must it return?”.
And finally, you may want to return it to a different location. In Russian, “Can I return it…?” and then you put a location is “Mozhna vernut' eta v….?”. Let`s break it down by syllable: mozh-na ver-nut' e-ta v. Now, let`s hear it once again: mozhna vernut' eta v….?
The first word “mozhna” means “can”. Let`s break down this word by syllable: mozh-na and mozhna. This is followed by “vernut'”, vernut', which in English is “return”: vernut', ver-nut', and vernut'. So, to recap here, we have “mozhna vernut'”. Literally, this means “can return”.
Let's take a look at the next “eta”, which means “it”: e-ta and eta. Then comes “v”, which means “at”. So altogether we have: “Mozhna vernut' eta v…?”. Literally, this means: “Can return it at…?”.
At the end, you have to mention the location, for example, office in Moscow. If you rent it, for example, in St. Petersburg, which in Russian is "ofis v Maskve". Hence, we have “Mozhna eta vernut' v ofis v Maskve?”. Mozhna eta vernut' v ofis v Maskve?
Renting a car is great to discover Russia. But if you go somewhere far, from Moscow to far east, it is better to use other means of travel such as trains or airplanes. Russian nature is beautiful but roads are not, and if you go by car, your introductory trip to nature can turn into a few days of discovery in the middle of the wild forest. So, any type of car will be fine for cities and suburbs, and jeeps for outdoor adventures. Hummers are not good due to its weight, something lighter but taller than normal cars. And if you brought your own car, long trips along Russian roads will help you test the quality and survival rate of your steel roaring friend.
Ok, to close out today`s lesson we'd like for you to practice what we`d just learnt. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for saying it aloud. You'll have a few seconds before I`ll give you the answer. Udachi! That means “good luck”! Ok, here we go!
I would like to rent a car……..Ya khatel by arendavat' mashynu
When must I return it?……..Kagda ya dolzhen eta vernut'
Can I return it at…?..........Mozhna vernut' eta v…?
Alright, that's going to do for today. See you tomorrow, which in Russian is da zaftra!

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RussianPod101.com
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Where is Proverbs Lesson 5?

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